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Author Topic: It started September 1st 1939 - WWII Day by Day Recount  (Read 209873 times)
Koen
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« on: 1 September 2009, 20:26:50 »
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September 1st 1939

On September 1st German forces invaded Poland from the north, south, and west. Spread thin defending their long borders, the Polish armies were soon forced to withdraw eastward. After the mid-September Polish defeat in the Battle of the Bzura, the Germans gained an undisputed advantage. Polish forces then began a withdrawal southeast, following a plan that called for a long defence in the Romanian bridgehead area, where the Polish forces were to await an expected Allied counterattack and relief.

The battle for Poland officially took place from September 1st until October 6th 1939.

The German name for the Poland operation was called 'Operation White' or in German 'Fall Weiss'

The plan and execution only came after a treaty between Germany and Russia to divide Poland...this treaty was called 'Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact' consisting of both Germany's and Russia's foreign minister names.

The excuse for the German attack was a staged attack from Polish troops, disguised German troops, on a German borderpost...
The whole thing was staged ofcourse...

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« Reply #1 on: 1 September 2009, 21:26:17 »
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first "Blitzkrieg", nice find.

Actualy, on SEP 1, (this off memory, so feel free to correct/bash me) it was the "Schleswig Holstein" opening fire on the "Westerplatte" close to Danzig - in fact IIRC on a minor coast guard outpost - at 0445 JULIET.

The defending forces (again., of memory and IIRC, were a 200 soldiers battalion that gave quite a fight).

It would be interesting (just me) to see who the attacking and defending forces on that day were in detail, at "Westerplatte".

Any record on the Polish BN? OOB? TO+E? Survivors? Same for the Germans

Rattler
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« Reply #2 on: 2 September 2009, 09:21:45 »
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first "Blitzkrieg", nice find.

Actualy, on SEP 1, (this off memory, so feel free to correct/bash me) it was the "Schleswig Holstein" opening fire on the "Westerplatte" close to Danzig - in fact IIRC on a minor coast guard outpost - at 0445 JULIET.

The defending forces (again., of memory and IIRC, were a 200 soldiers battalion that gave quite a fight).

It would be interesting (just me) to see who the attacking and defending forces on that day were in detail, at "Westerplatte".

Any record on the Polish BN? OOB? TO+E? Survivors? Same for the Germans

Rattler



Battle of Westerplatte


yes, watch the videoclip and you see the "Schleswig Holstein" opening fire!

will look into more details....today September 2nd...reports will follow later today
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« Reply #3 on: 2 September 2009, 09:44:54 »
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Well I will put some links of interesting photos from other web like graphic support and detailed corps in that beginning support:

http://images.google.es/imgres?imgurl=http://history.sandiego.edu/cdr2/WW2Pics/51867big.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.taringa.net/posts/info/1077623/La-Campa%25C3%25B1a-de-Polonia.html&usg=__B0Sgg4NacTzuKidyasKrFLNg19E=&h=1102&w=980&sz=510&hl=es&start=4&um=1&tbnid=lScWh00LyVgG8M:&tbnh=150&tbnw=133&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dinvasion%2Bde%2Bpolonia%26hl%3Des%26sa%3DX%26um%3D1

It´s in Spanish but I like how it´s resumed and about the units it´s easy to understand. Anyway Rattler or me can solve any doubt. I am so off my head to translate all now.

On it, you can notice how the tram was prepared by ss soldiers, including name of the officer, name of the village station attacked, etc.


German failures in Poland campaign
(depends on the informer fountain)
 
DEADS

Feldgrau  16.343
G. Parada  Between 8.082 -10.572
Shirer 3.400

MISSING

Feldgrau 320
G. Parada  Between  3.404 y 5.029
Shirer Huh?

WOUNDED

Feldgrau 27.280
G. Parada  Between 27.278 y 30.322
Shirer 30.322



GERMAN TANK LOSSES

Pz. I    89

Pz. II    83

Pz. 35(t)    7

Pz. 38(t)  7

Pz. III    26

Pz. IV  19

Befs.Pz   5
___________

TOTAL   236
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« Reply #4 on: 2 September 2009, 14:12:26 »
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September 2nd: the morning after ...

The citizens of the town Wielun in Poland didn't sleep last night...yesterday their town was bombed by the Luftwaffe during the first hostile action of World War II killing around 1300 civilians. This meant that the killing rate was more then double of Guernica.
90% of the towncentre was destroyed with for the complete town a destruction rate of 75%

The attack came in 5 min. before the bombing of the Westerplatte at 04:40 in the morning....



For the citizens of Wielun World War II didn't start on the radio, it started it's terror amongst their families and friends at home.

StuKa's from a formation of 62 Ju 87 from I/StG 76 (Hptm Walter Sigel) and I/StG 77 (Hptm Friedrich-Karl Freiherr von Dalwigk zu Lichtenfels) arrived at 04:40 for the first bombardment wave dropping 380 bombs - about 46 tons of explosive.
Historians say there were 4 waves at 04:40, 07:00, 10:00 & 14:00 hours.



wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wielu%C5%84
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« Reply #5 on: 2 September 2009, 19:30:42 »
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Outcry over Poland

United Kingdom Parliament

Headline: Today in Parliament - there was an outcry in the House of Commons this evening when Mr Greenwood asked the Prime Minister why Britain was not standing by Poland.

The Commons began an emergency sitting at 3.00pm when a full house of members and ministers attended this special session on the crisis. It was not until a 7.45pm that the Prime Minister entered the chamber to loud cheering.

'... bound to take action unless German forces are withdrawn ...'

Anxiously awaiting news of the developments since yesterday, members were told by Mr Chamberlain that the warning message read to the House yesterday was delivered to Herr von Ribbentrop at 9.30pm last night. There has still been no reply.

Mr Chamberlain assured the House that His Majesty's Government would be bound to take action unless German forces are withdrawn from Polish territory. He also drew attention to the vital question of the time limit to be observed within which the German forces would be allowed to withdraw from Poland. The Government, he said, were in communication with the French Government over this.

    'If the German Government should agree to withdraw their forces, then His Majesty's Government would be willing to regard the position as being the same as it was before the German forces crossed the Polish frontier.'

Mr Chamberlain went on to announce that yesterday the Reichstag passed a law reuniting Danzig with the Reich. His Majesty's Government, he said, refused to recognise this act which was a flagrant violation of the League of Nation's protection of the Free City and the rights given to Poland in Danzig, by treaty.

There were loud cheers when Mr Greenwood, the acting leader of the opposition rose to reply to cries of, 'What about Britain?' and, 'Speak for the working classes!' The whole House, he said, was perturbed by Mr Chamberlain's statement. An end to the incessant strain was sought by all quarters.

Cries of 'Now!' accompanied this remark, and Mr Greenwood concluded by saying: 'I hope, therefore, that tomorrow morning, however hard it may be to the Right Honourable Gentleman - and no one would care to be in his shoes tonight - we shall know the mind of the British Government, and that there shall be no more devices for dragging out what has been dragged out too long. The moment we look like weakening, at that moment dictatorship knows we are beaten. We are not beaten; we shall not be beaten; we cannot be beaten.'

In reply Mr Chamberlain hoped that despite the difficult position the Government was in tonight, his statement earlier did not betray the slightest weakening.

    'It is very possible that the communications which we have had with the French Government will receive a reply... in the course of the next few hours. I understand that the French cabinet is in session at this moment and I feel certain that I shall be able to make to the House a statement of a definite character tomorrow when the House meets again.'

The earlier business in the Commons today was to debate the several bills dealing with the Emergency Provisions for Personal Injury and National Health Insurance and Contributory Pensions. The first and longest debate this morning was the National Health Service (Armed Forces) Bill, which will make all fit males, aged 18 to 40 liable to be called up. After several objections to the lowering of the minimum age to 18 had been heard, the Bill was given a Government majority of seven votes in its first reading.

[*Reports taken from BBC news bulletins, and a range of daily newspapers]
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« Reply #6 on: 2 September 2009, 19:51:58 »
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On this day the Germans moved on towards the town of Bydgoszcz.
The Polish 15th infantrydivision offered tough resistance.
More interesting is what happened in the city itself.
The small German civilian minority in the town was well organized.
The only regular Polish armyforces in the town were signal, transport and other support units.
With help from the local Polish population this attempt was crushed.
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« Reply #7 on: 2 September 2009, 19:55:31 »
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more events that happened on September 2nd 1939:

The United Kingdom and France issue a joint ultimatum to Germany, requiring German troops to evacuate Polish territory; Italian dictator Benito Mussolini declares the neutrality of his nation; President Douglas Hyde of the Republic of Ireland declares the neutrality of his nation; the Swiss government orders a general mobilisation of its forces.

The National Service (Armed Forces) Act (1939) was enacted immediately and enforced full conscription on all males between 18 and 41 resident in the UK.

The Free City of Danzig is annexed by Germany.

In France... The British RAF Advanced Air Striking Force arrives. Some 10 bomber squadrons are involved in the deployment.

In Berlin... The German government announces that Norwegian neutrality will be respected, provided that Britain and France do the same. Hitler rejects an offer to mediate the German-Polish dispute, made by Mussolini on August 31st and the proposal for a peace conference.

In Dublin... The Irish government declares its neutrality.

In Bern... The Swiss government orders a general mobilization.
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« Reply #8 on: 2 September 2009, 20:18:41 »
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Interesting, you guys sure know a lot about that time frame, learning something new each day.

I have stumbled today (but - my bad - not recorded the URL) on a site that does the same: WWII day-by-day, maybe worthwile digging it up?

Thanks for sharing, and keep it up (only another 5 1/2 yrs left...)!

Rattler
« Last Edit: 2 September 2009, 20:33:34 by Rattler » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: 3 September 2009, 19:50:05 »
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Allies:
The Allied governments declared war on Germany on 3 September, this was a pure political decision.
Nothing really happened, especially the British government thought and hoped that it could be solved with talks with Germany.
The British ultimatum to Germany expires at 1100 hours and at 1115 hours, Chamberlain broadcasts to announce that the war has begun. Chamberlain forms a War Cabinet, which includes Churchill as First Lord of the Admiralty (which is signaled to all Royal Navy ships and installations with the message "Winston is back")
As a matter of fact, Poland was handed over to the Germans, same as the other countries Germany annexed in the last 2 years proceeding the invasion of Poland.


Poland:
Günther von Kluge, in command of Sixth Army Group, in the north had reached the Vistula (some 10 kilometres from the German border at that time) river, Georg von Küchler, in command of 3rd Army, was approaching the Narew River and Walther von Reichenau's armour of 10th Army was already beyond the Warta river.
14th Army, commande by General List, is converging on Krakow.


SS Athenia, under Captain James Cook, departed Glasgow for Montreal on 1 September 1939, via Liverpool and Belfast, carrying 1,103 civilians, including more than 300 Americans, and 315 crew. She left Liverpool at 13:00 on 2 September, and on the evening of 3 September was 60 mi (97 km) south of Rockall (250 miles/400 km northwest of Inishtrahull, Ireland), when she was sighted by the German U-boat U-30 commanded by Oberleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp around 16:30. Lemp later claimed that the fact that she was a darkened ship steering a zigzag course which seemed to be well off the normal shipping routes made him believe she was either a troopship or a Q-ship or an armed merchant cruiser. U-30 tracked the Athenia for three hours until eventually, at 19:40, when both vessels were between Rockall and Tory Island, Lemp ordered two torpedoes to be fired. The first struck home and exploded, while the second misfired. Athenia began to settle by the stern.

R.A.F. does his first leaflet drop over Germany, some 6 millions leaflets were dropped over major cities in northern Germany and the Ruhr area.

Overseas, New Zealand and Australia declare war on Germany.

Belgium declares its neutrality as tiny neighbour of Germany.

After 3 days 1.5 million people in the UK were transported out of the cities to the countryside.
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« Reply #10 on: 4 September 2009, 01:14:14 »
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R.A.F. does his first leaflet drop over Germany, some 6 millions leaflets were dropped over major cities in northern Germany and the Ruhr area.


Contents known?

Rattler
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« Reply #11 on: 4 September 2009, 09:48:52 »
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R.A.F. does his first leaflet drop over Germany, some 6 millions leaflets were dropped over major cities in northern Germany and the Ruhr area.


Contents known?

Rattler


some info: 10 Whitley bombers of Nos. 51 and 58 Sqns carry out the first RAF raid over Germany, dropping some 6 million leaflets over Hamburg, Bremen and the Ruhr

can't find anything on the content of the leaflets...still looking....
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« Reply #12 on: 4 September 2009, 14:34:18 »
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September 4th 1939

The RAF records its first losses of the war when five Wellingtons of No. 9 Sqn are shot down during a raid on German warships in the Elbe estuary.
It also raided German warships based in the Heligoland Bight with 29 Blenheim and Wellington bombers in a daylight raid. The Admiral Scheer is hit three times but the bombs do not explode. The cruiser Emden is damaged by wreckage of a shot-down Blenheim. Of the attacking aircraft, 7 are lost. There is no question at this stage of attacking targets in Germany.

In Poland... In the north, the Polish Modlin Army begins to retreat after putting up a stubborn defense around Mlawa. The Modlin army was one of the Polish armies that took part in the Polish Defensive War of 1939. After heavy casualties in the battle of M?awa (September 1-3), the Army was forced to abandon its positions near Warsaw around September 10; eventually it took part in the battle of Tomaszów Mazowiecki (September 21-26) and surrendered afterwards.

In the south, the German 10th Army, commanded by General Reichenau forces have already advanced more than 50 miles. Over Lodz, German Me109 fighters reportedly destroy 11 Polish fighters and 3 bombers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walther_von_Reichenau


First skirmishes on the border of Germany and France
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« Reply #13 on: 8 September 2009, 08:44:17 »
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September 5th 1939

The German 10th and 14th Armies cross the Vistula River, breaking through the cordon of Polish armies. Polish rear guards and armed civilians offer determined resistance at Bydgoszcz, on the southern end of the Polish corridor, before yielding to the units of the German 3rd Corps. Germans troops find hundreds of German residents of the city massacred by the fleeing Poles. Such incidents are used to provide support for earlier claims by Hitler justifying the invasion. On entering Piotrkow, German forces set fire to the Jewish district. The Polish supreme command orders a general retreat behind the Vistula. Meanwhile, German bombers destroy the town of Sulejow, southwest of Warsaw.

The United States government proclaims its neutrality.

September 6th 1939

Two RAF Spitfires shoot down 2 RAF Hurricanes in error during the first air raid warning, which turns out to be false. The incident becomes known as the "Battle of Barking Creek."

The German 10th Army (Reichenau) continues to lead the advance, having already penetrated to the east of Lodz. Armored spearheads of the German forces capture Tomaszow and Kielce, southwest of Warsaw. Krakow is taken by troops of the German 14th Army (List). The Polish government and supreme command leave Warsaw. The government is relocating to the region of Luck-Kremieniec, while the supreme command moves to Brzesko on the Bug River. The Polish supreme command issues orders for all Poles capable of fighting, in and out of uniform, to retire to the line of the Narew, Vistula and San rivers. Meanwhile, Hitler visits the headquarters of the German 19th Panzer Corps (Guderian), on the northeastern front.

The Royal Navy forms the Northern Patrol consisting of 8 cruisers. The first British eastern convoy sails.


September 7th 1939

French patrols cross the frontier into Germany near Saarbrucken, marking the beginning of the Saar offensive. A total of 11 divisions advance along a 32 km frontage. There is negligible German opposition. The French mobilization is too slow and their tactical system too inflexible to permit any grander offensive operation. These gentle probes continue until September 17th when a larger advance is supposed to be made but is in fact cancelled because the Polish collapse makes it pointless.

The Polish naval base at Westerplatte, a enclave in Danzig, surrenders after renewed German bombardment after being besieged since September 1st. The Polish command decides that it will be impossible to hold the line of the Narew River although the order to do so has only been in force for one day. The forces in the Narew area are to retire to the Bug River. The German Schleswig-Holstein begins daily bombardment of Hela, a Polish naval base.

Hitler meets with Admiral Erich Raeder, Commander-in-Chief of the Kriegsmarine, and orders that "in order not to provoke neutral countries, the United States in particular, it is forbidden to torpedo passenger steamers, even when sailing in convoy. Warfare against French merchant ships, attacks on French warships and mine laying off French ports is prohibited." The order is in response to the sinking of the Athenia.

The first British Atlantic convoys set out. The convoy system has already been reintroduced on the East Coast. Although escorts can only be provided as far as 12.5 degrees west, they do provide effective protection against U-Boats. Many of the faster ships and some particularly slow ones do not sail in convoy at this stage or later in the war. During 1939, almost all U-Boat successes are from such "independents."
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« Reply #14 on: 8 September 2009, 08:58:06 »
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7 September 1939 ? Lords Sitting
THE WAR: PRESENT POSITION.HL Deb 07 September 1939 vol 114 cc1017-24 1017

Quote
§ 3.5 p.m.

§ LORD SNELL My Lords, I beg to ask His Majesty's Government if they have any statement to make on the present position.

§ THE LORD PRESIDENT OF THE COUNCIL (EARL STANHOPE) My Lords, the House will, I am sure, realise that it is only possible for me to give a general indication of the present situation and of the state of our defences. There is necessarily a number of matters to which, in the public interest, it is impossible to refer. With that necessary preamble I will give the House a résumé of the position.

In the East the Poles are fighting hard against a strong and ruthless enemy, who is relying on the weight of numbers and material to crush all opposition. The Polish soldier has ever shown himself to be a courageous and determined fighter; and to-day he is worthily maintaining this tradition. Against overwhelming superiority in the air, outnumbered and outgunned, he is contesting every yard of the German advance. The Germans have often stressed the need for a short war and a quick decision. In pursuance of this idea the German plan appears to be to concentrate their first main effort against Poland, and as the House is aware, that country was invaded just over a week ago without any formal declaration of war. In spite of the human and material losses which they have already suffered, the morale and courage of the Polish people remain unaffected. His Majesty's Government and the French Government have to-day signed an agreement with the Polish Government for the provision of further financial assistance to Poland to enable her to replenish her resources.

In the West, France has, like ourselves, mobilised her forces with complete efficiency 1018 and smoothness and they are now in contact with the enemy on their common frontier. Certain information has been published of what has taken place, but, for obvious reasons, no details can yet be disclosed. The outbreak of war has found the same spirit, determination and solidarity among the French people as is evident here. The understanding between the two countries is complete, and the arrangements, which have now been put into force, for co-operation in all the activities concerned with the prosecution of the war, are working smoothly and well.

In this country the defensive military dispositions of our Army, which cover a very wide field, were made in good time owing to the precautionary measures which it was decided to adopt during the period of tension. The manning of the Anti-Aircraft and Coast Defences was efficiently carried out. Within a short time of calling out the units guns and searchlights were fully manned. Since a large number of the Anti-Aircraft units were in camp and away from their home stations this reflects great credit on their organisation. The guarding of vulnerable points has been taken over by the National Defence Companies supplemented by personnel of the Territorial Army. The personnel reached their posts with the minimum of delay and under trying weather conditions. The mobilisation of the remainder of the Army has been carried out with the greatest smoothness. The morale of all ranks is high. In particular, the spirit of the reservists recalled from civil life, some of whom have already this year been called up for training, is excellent. I should like to make special mention of the women of the Auxiliary Territorial Services who are performing many tasks under arduous conditions and thereby relieving soldiers for fighting duties.

Turning to the naval side the most important feature up to the present has been the development of German U-boat attacks on our shipping. The sinking of the "Athenia" with its scenes of death and terror virtually opened the war and no denials or inventions on the part of Germany will convince the public of German innocence of this crime, which has profoundly shocked and horrified the world. Apart from the case of the 1019 "Athenia" there have been attacks on other British merchant ships by German U-boats, and three or four ships have been sunk. On our side the Admiralty have taken immediate counter measures. British destroyers and other anti-submarine craft have been very active, and large reinforcements of anti-submarine and escort vessels are rapidly becoming available. As my right honourable friend the First Lord has already informed another place, steps are being taken to establish a convoy system at the earliest possible moment. This method of protection can obviously only be instituted after the outbreak of war and it takes time to bring it fully into operation, but the House can be satisfied that it is being applied with the utmost possible speed and vigour. Most of the ships which have been attacked hitherto are vessels which commenced their voyages before war had broken out, and naturally, for them the full scope of our defensive organisation could not immediately provide. While a certain proportion of weekly losses must be expected, and we must not minimise the threat to our shipping, I think the House and the country may rest assured that the Navy, with all their war time experience of handling this problem, and with the added advantage of the methods of submarine detection and destruction which have since been developed, will increasingly bring the problem under control.

His Majesty's Government would next like to pay their tribute to the very gallant attack which was made by units of the Royal Air Force on certain German warships off Wilhelmshaven, during which at least two hits were secured on one of the so-called pocket battleships. It will be realised that the objectives attacked—namely, the German Fleet bases at Wilhelmshaven and at the entrance to the Kiel Canal—are probably among the most strongly defended points in Germany. The manner in which the Royal Air Force attacks were pressed home despite the strength of the defences is worthy of the highest praise. Mention must be made of the weather conditions prevailing on the afternoon of the attack. Visibility was extremely poor, and the final stages of the attack are stated to have been carried out in a blinding rainstorm. A high degree of navigational 1020 skill was thus necessary to enable the attack to reach its objective at all, and the fact that hits were registered demonstrates the ability of the Royal Air Force to carry out its attacks under conditions of great difficulty.

Finally, I think it right to stress the fact that a high proportion of the officers and men in the squadrons concerned have entered the Royal Air Force and received their training since expansion began. The House may also be interested to learn that those who took part in the attack included a number who came from the Dominions. As the House knows, extensive reconnaissance flights have been carried out over Germany on three successive nights during the last week by units of the Bomber Command. More than 10,000,000 copies of Notes to the German people have been distributed over a wide area of Northern and Western Germany, including the Ruhr. Although on each occasion the enemy defences were set fully in motion, no contact was secured by enemy fighters and all our aircraft returned safely. The activity of the Fighter and Coastal Commands, if less conspicuous, has been no less intense. From the early stages of the emergency all squadrons of the Fighter Command have been at their war stations and in a state of instant readiness. The Coastal Command has also been busily engaged in extensive reconnaissance over the surrounding seas in order to locate and destroy enemy submarines.

I now wish to say something of the organisation of the Home Defence Services which is being rapidly completed. The Regional organisation is functioning well. There is still some shortage of whole-time personnel but this is chiefly now to be found in country districts. The enforcement of the blackout is proceeding satisfactorily. With the help of the Air Force reconnaissance every night it has been possible to discover lights irregularly showing and action is at once taken to deal with the offenders.

The Government decided last Thursday that the plans for evacuation, mainly in respect of school children, young children and their mothers, should be put into operation. Evacuation started on Friday morning; in a number of towns it was completed by Saturday; in London, where the problem is exceptionally large, it was 1021 completed by Monday. The operation has now been substantially completed and has covered not only those towns for which plans had been worked out beforehand, but also a number of other vulnerable areas. So far approximately 1,475,000 children and mothers have been evacuated in the country as a whole. The arrangements for evacuation and transport were carried out without a hitch, and those responsible for reception in the receiving areas have displayed remarkable enterprise, efficiency and good will. The process of assimilating this large increase of population in the receiving areas take time and calls for tolerance and mutual understanding. Schools are to be reopened in the receiving areas as quickly as possible, and both public authorities and voluntary effort will be busily occupied with measures for the welfare of the children and for the assistance of the householders who are so generously providing homes for the mothers and children.

Over 200,000 hospital beds are to-day ready for air-raid casualties. Of these 56,500 are in the London Region, 15,500 inside the county and 41,000 outside the county. The beds in any region would, of course, be available to meet the needs of any other hard-pressed area. Over 11,000 trained nurses, 4,000 assistant nurses and over 50,000 auxiliary nurses, have joined the Civil Nursing Reserve for service in hospitals and first-aid posts; but more of both trained nurses and auxiliaries are needed, especially women who can give whole-time service in any part of the country. Nearly 2,500 doctors have accepted enrolment in the Emergency Medical Service, and acceptances are being received daily. The Auxiliary Fire Service was mobilised quickly and, on the whole, smoothly, and, in the main, the available fire fighting units are being kept permanently manned and ready for action. In London, for instance, there are over 1,800 fire pumps ready for action, as against about 125 in peace time.

I hope that the statement I have made on behalf of His Majesty's Government will show the House and the country that our war effort in its many aspects is rapidly gaining momentum. It has behind it the full weight of all the people of this country who are united in their conviction that no nation ever went to 1022 war in a higher cause. We are greatly heartened by the knowledge that, in the struggle for the defence of liberty and free institutions and the preservation of all that makes life worth living, we can count on the support of the oversea members of the British Commonwealth. Of their own free will and under no form of compulsion, save the moral compelling force of right and justice, these self-governing nations have declared their intention of co-operating in a cause which is no less precious to them than it is to the people of the homeland.

§ 3.19 p.m.

§ LORD SNELL My Lords, the House will desire me first of all to thank the noble Earl for the statement that he has made. We recognise the difficulties that the Government have had in making this statement, and that it must of necessity be confined to general things, rather than to the specific. I merely wish to say that the question I put to-day is one that I shall have frequently to put as the weeks go by, and it occurs to me that if the House does meet for one or two days each week it would be advisable that the question should be asked on the day the House may meet rather than on the day it may decide to adjourn, so that any necessary business connected with it may be brought up and transacted. I should also like to say that, in our judgment, these statements after to-day ought to be open to discussion—that is to say, we may feel we should like to comment on certain aspects of what has been said.

I make a final plea that, as far as His Majesty's Government find it possible, the fullest information should be given to the public. The public have behaved extraordinarily well. They are quite as capable of bearing any disappointment as are the members of His Majesty's Government, and it is fair to them, for their attitude and their bearing, that we should give them whatever information we possibly can. I do not wish to complain because I know how difficult the position is at the moment; but it is undoubtedly true that we can get more information from America than we can get here. That is something we ought not to continue to let happen. I do not know why it has not been possible, up to now, to say more about the episode on the Kiel Canal. In my judgment, so far as I have information, it is not information 1023 that the country should be ashamed to hear, and I give that as an illustration of the need, as far as it is usefully possible, for the maximum amount of information to be given.

§ 3.22 p.m.

§ VISCOUNT CECIL OF CHELWOOD My Lords, there is only one small question I should like to put to the Government. I am afraid I have not given notice, but they can probably answer directly. The noble Earl spoke about the dissemination of a great number of leaflets in Germany. If I may be permitted, I would tender my congratulations on the enterprise and imagination which dictated that move; but I have not been able to find in the Press any account of what was in these leaflets. It may be I have missed it, but, if not, I should like to know why it was not published, because it seems to me a good thing that we should know exactly what was said to the Germans. I may be wrong, but I put the question as several people have put it to me.

§ 3.23 p.m.

§ EARL STANHOPE My Lords, in regard to the last question by the noble Viscount, we are not certain on the Front Bench whether this leaflet has appeared in the papers or not, but I shall certainly make inquiries and find out about it. No doubt my noble friend the Minister of Information will deal with the matter.

§ LORD SNELL Could you not supply us with a copy?

§ EARL STANHOPE I have not got one on me. I cannot conceive why it should not have been published. I understand it has been, but I shall look into the matter and proper action will be taken. As regards the question put to me by the noble Lord, the Leader of the Opposition, I shall convey to the Prime Minister what he has said. I am certain my right honourable friend is prepared to tell the public as much as possible, but of course we must bear in mind that statements made here have a far wider field. Although at present we have nothing we are not prepared to say to the enemy which would not be more disconcerting to him than to us, we have to keep these matters in mind. As regards more secret information—for instance, such things as casualties to German U-boats and so on—there are sometimes reasons why we 1024 should not claim successes, and perhaps the effect of that in Germany is all the greater.

THE LORD ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY My Lords, with regard to the particular matter mentioned by Lord Cecil, the fact is that a message from the Prime Minister to the German nation was published in the Press, but it was not stated whether that was the actual leaflet that was used by the Air Force.

§ VISCOUNT CECIL OF CHELWOOD That was stated to be a broadcast by the Prime Minister, but I dare say it is the same thing.

 
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stoffel
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« Reply #15 on: 8 September 2009, 15:03:37 »
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In the morning of 8 september the minesweeper HM Willem van Ewijck hit a mine during a sweep and exploded.
This tragic event cost 33 of the 51 sailors their lives, it happened near West Terschelling.

On the Atlantic see HMSS Breedijk (Holland -America line) picked up the crew of the tanker Kennebec.
This boat was torpedoed and destroyed by U-boot U34 of the German navy.

1 Dutch soldier (private Jansen from Utrecht) died in a truck accident near the Frisian town of Blija.
He was positioned in the back of the vehicle and was killed instantly when the truck drove into a ditch.

Polish campaign
The German divisions in the spearhead of the advance were in a dangerous position, their flank was vulnerable for a counterattack, therefore they had to wait for the infantry to arrive and they also encountered logistical problems and shortages of fuel.
Lieutenant-General Kutrzeba finally got permission to mount a counterattack against them on the evening of the 8th with the Poznan and Pomorze armies.
The attack would start the next day and would prove to be a surprise for the Germans.
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« Reply #16 on: 8 September 2009, 16:44:54 »
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this is a youtube video with keywords 'Poznan 1939'

maybe someone can confirm this is the Polish army of Poznan in 1939, before the war started?

XX lecie 57 pu?ku piechoty - Pozna? 1939


Quote
Krótki film z 1939 roku, z obchodów XX-lecia istnienia 57 pu?ku piechoty z Poznania. S? wi?c sztandary, oficerowie i na moje oko delegacja Rumunii. Pu?k bowiem zosta? nazwany na cze?? Króla Rumunii Karola II. 28 kwietnia 1937 r., w czasie wizyty w Polsce obj?? on honorowy patronat nad 57 p.p. Otrzyma? on te? w tym czasie Order Or?a Bia?ego. Zdj?cia najprawdobdobniej wykonano przy ul. Bukowskiej. W 00:27 wida? gen. bryg. Edmunda Knoll-Kownackiego, dowódce D.O.K. nr VII /Poznan, prezesa Aeroklubu Poznanskiego.

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ENGLISH: A short movie made in 1939 during the celebrations of 20-years of existence of the polish 57th infantry regiment from Poznan. Among the quest there is romanian delegation, because the regiment was named after the King Charles II of Romania. On the 28th April 1937 he took honourary pratonage over the unit.

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« Reply #17 on: 9 September 2009, 00:01:08 »
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Anybody has an idea what 50 Million dead actually means (as difference to e.g. 45 Millions)?

Lined up in a row, all corpses (average size 1.7 mtr) will go roughly *7* times around the planet...

Sometimes it helps to understand magnitudes we are so easily throwing around with such calculations...

Rattler
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"War does not determine who is right, war determines who is left...": The Rattler Way Of Life (thanks! to Solideo)... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9v3Vyr5o2Q
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« Reply #18 on: 9 September 2009, 12:22:16 »
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Anybody has an idea what 50 Million dead actually means (as difference to e.g. 45 Millions)?

Lined up in a row, all corpses (average size 1.7 mtr) will go roughly *7* times around the planet...

Sometimes it helps to understand magnitudes we are so easily throwing around with such calculations...

Rattler


there are several facts that nobody will ever understand....too big...too many....too large and more...
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« Reply #19 on: 9 September 2009, 13:03:34 »
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September 9th 1939

Poland: The largest battle during this campaign, the Battle of Bzura, took place near the Bzura river west of Warsaw and lasted from 9 September to 19 September. Polish armies Pozna? and Pomorze, retreating from the border area of the Polish Corridor, assembled in the Kutno area under the command of General Tadeusz Kutrzeba with about 10 Polish divisions. In full-force they attacked the flank of the advancing German 8th Army, but the counterattack failed after initial success. The Battle of Bzura involved 18 German divisions from 4th, 8th and 10th Army with air support.

After the defeat, Poland lost its ability to take the initiative and counterattack on a large scale.

The German 4th Panzer Division, part of the German 16th Panzer Corps, mounts an attack in the southeast suburbs of Warsaw but is beaten off.

Göring says that "the Polish Army will never emerge again from the German embrace." Ribbentrop invites the Soviets to advance to their new common frontier, the Narew, Vistula and San rivers (the Bug and Pissa would eventually replace the Vistula to avoid a divided Warsaw.

Western Europe

French troops advance into the Warndt Forest across the German border and occupy 3 square miles of German territory. The action is widely viewed as having more propaganda than military purpose since the region, referred to by the French as "occupied Germany," is deserted, heavily mined and booby-trapped.

The last of 13 RAF squadrons arrives in move begun on September 4th to strengthen the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on the mainland.
Goring threatens reprisals against Britain if the RAF bombs Germany and boasts that Berlin will never be subjected to enemy aerial attack.
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