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Author Topic: Random WWI pictures  (Read 181196 times)
Koen
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« on: 9 December 2009, 19:12:05 »
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post here your selection of random WWI pictures

thx

Koen
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Solideo
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« Reply #1 on: 9 December 2009, 20:34:21 »
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« Reply #2 on: 13 December 2009, 01:53:50 »
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I wonder who these men were?  What was their background,  their history, and how many survived ww1...
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Solideo
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« Reply #3 on: 26 December 2009, 10:02:15 »
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German trench xmas


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« Reply #4 on: 26 December 2009, 11:27:27 »
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I wonder who these men were?


First guess from their Kilts, they're Highlanders.
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« Reply #5 on: 26 December 2009, 16:32:34 »
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I wonder who these men were?



First guess from their Kilts, they're Highlanders.

yep, look Scots, check the uniform, and the cap the guy wears that has no helmet



One more here:



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The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders was an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Scottish Division. -snip- When the Great War broke out in 1914 the regiment had two Regular Battalions (1st and 2nd), two Militia Battalions (3rd and 4th) and five Territorial Battalions (5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th each of which split into 1st, 2nd and 3rd-line battalions). Seven more Service Battalions were raised for Kitchener's Army and they were numbered 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th and 16th.

Ten of the battalions served in France and Flanders (1st, 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th and 14th) gaining 65 battle honours and four served in the Mediterranean area (1st, 5th, 6th and 12th) gaining a further 13 battle honours.

431 officers and 6475 other ranks lost their lives and six Victoria Crosses were awarded to the regiment during the war.



Rattler
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« Reply #6 on: 26 December 2009, 18:03:14 »
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You gotta admit, it takes cajones to go to war wearing a skirt! From their valiant history, they all probably had big brass ones.
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« Reply #7 on: 26 December 2009, 19:21:32 »
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Cojones? They sure had, they have all history to prove it. I do not think, though, that in WWI it served them much, gas doesn´t know about brass.

And, as you had it so right first time, it is *not* a "skirt", it is a "kilt"... Smiley; and it takes (big) C still to walk around this society today, they still do:

Quote
The Scottish of the Highlands, emigrated from Ireland around 375 AD.  They displaced the native Picts and brought with them their native Irish dress. This consisted of a léine [LAY-na] and a brat.

The Léine being a shirt or linen under tunic, which ended at his knees.  In the earliest times, it was a shapeless garment although by the 16th Century, it had become a full pleated smock with wide sleeves, sometimes using up to 7 yards of linen in the body alone.  It was always made of linen and its colour was invariably yellow, saffron was an easy dye to obtain, linen was a difficult fabric to dye, therefore strong colours such as red were almost impossible.The method of "fixing" the dyes, was to place the dyed garment in a bucket of urine.  The English referred to this garment as the "saffron shirt", with wide sleeves and an elaborately pleated skirt (like a modern day short kilt). However, it was never made of wool or plaid material.  Sometimes trews were worn underneath and a short jacket on top. The Highlands were for hundreds of years, the backwaters of Europe, their fashions slightly influenced by the Lowland Towns of Scotland, but as a rule, stayed unchanged for centuries.

The Brat was a rectangular piece of cloth thrown around the body and fastened on the breast or shoulder by a brooch.  Both men and women wore them.  The brat could be wrapped around the shoulders or looped under the sword arm for better maneuverability.  Brats were worn in varying lengths depending upon the occasion and the rank of the wearer. They were also worn in a good many colours, “variegated” and “many-coloured” being mentioned .  Because the number of colours one could wear was restricted by one’s rank, a many-coloured brat was a sure sign of nobility. Though tartan was not as common in Scotland then as it was at later times, these wraps could very well have been of some "tartan" pattern, as we have archaeological evidence of a variant of tartan cloth being worn in Scotland from the third or fourth century.

At this point, it would help to define a few terms in their original usage.  The word “plaid” or "Plaide" in Gaelic means a blanket. In some Middle English quotations, plaid is used as a verb, meaning "to pleat.” Therefore, a “plaid” refers to a blanket or something that is pleated, not the striped material associated with the Highland Scots.  The Gaelic word for tartan as we know it today is breacán.  This can mean speckled, dappled, striped and spotted as well as our modern “tartan”, in other words, patterned.  Secondly we must define “tartan.”  This also does not refer in any way to a colour or pattern.  Tartan, from the French “tiretaine,” indicates a kind of cloth irrespective of its colour and it is taken to mean a type of light wool.  Tartan also referred to a silk/wool blend.  

- snip some hundred years -

What we think of as "the kilt" today was purportedly invented in 1725 by an Englishman.  Thomas Rawlinson, owner of an iron works in Glengarie and Lochaber.  This gentleman had a number of Highlanders in his employ and came to fancy the Highland way of dressing.  However, the machinery and fires of the iron works posed a danger because of the Highlanders’ voluminous plaids.  Rawlinson abbreviated the belted plaid, cutting off all material above the waist and further tailoring that below.  What resulted is the skirt-like garment we know as the kilt today.  In Gaelic, it is known as the feileadh beag (little wrap) to distinguish it from the feileadh mór (big wrap), the belted plaid.

Ivan Baillie of Aberiachan, Esq. attests to this story in a 1768 letter published in Edinburgh Magazine in March 1785:  “And I certify from my own knowledge, that till I returned from Edinburgh to reside in this Country in the year 1725, after serving seven or eight years with writers to the signet, I never saw the felie-beg used, nor heard any mention of such a piece of dress, not (even) from my father, who was very intelligent and well-known to Highlanders, and lived to the age of 83 years, and died in the year 1738, born in May, 1655.” The phillabeg was worn most definitely in the eighteenth century, its use declining after the 1790s when the tailored kilt was introduced, though it continued to be worn by some as late as the 1820s



Latest design worn in A´stan:



More formally, looks like this, MM would have been proud of that little wind  champ :





In movies, somehow we find it normal:



FWIW, Rattler
« Last Edit: 26 December 2009, 19:41:02 by Rattler » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: 27 December 2009, 02:30:28 »
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I only called it a 'skirt' to accentuate the nature of my jest, as I am highly familiar with their heritage, being as half my ancestry is Irish (Murphy Clan). Good article for those who are unfamiliar.
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« Reply #9 on: 27 December 2009, 11:15:08 »
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I would not like to wear a skirt when jumping over a wire fence. You can have many cojones before doing, and no one after that (cojones will be in hung on the wire fence)  cry

Best and cheers
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« Reply #10 on: 27 December 2009, 15:48:58 »
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Crikey...so they really don't wear anything under those kilts?  Not even in windy Scotland?     hihi
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« Reply #11 on: 29 December 2009, 07:38:35 »
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Crikey...so they really don't wear anything under those kilts?  Not even in windy Scotland?     hihi


Stop blowing Jilly  hihi
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Alan65
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« Reply #12 on: 28 September 2012, 17:09:40 »
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This postcard is kind of random, so I thought I'd put it in this thread.
Pictured above is Hans von Minning, 15-year-old cadet in the Augustaner Guards Regiment, from Germany.  (I think someone may have lied about his age, although 100 years ago, people were generally smaller and less developed!) 
When I put this image up on Flickr, I found another image just like this in the US Library of Congress' Flickr account.  The images are the same but the LoC's has a different caption, a hand-written on the negative caption at the top stating this is the Regiment's 'mascot'.

Great, clear image with nice detail of some of the equipment.
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Alan65
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« Reply #13 on: 7 October 2012, 17:29:02 »
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Artillery caisson, Salonika Greece, WWI.  The back of this postcard has writing on it including a date which looks like "8 Juin 1907" and then someone (later?) wrote "year 1917!".  If 1917, it's obviously WWI; I couldn't really find any reason for a French Artillery unit to be in Greece in 1907.
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« Reply #14 on: 6 November 2012, 22:59:53 »
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This is the kind of postcard and image that's easy to overlook at 1st and 2nd viewing.  In reading the back, we learn that this is from a US doughboy writing home to Salina Kansas.  He states that it's where he is currently living and that the Rhine River is 2 km. away.  This is a little detail about a typical soldier's life that adds to our understanding of the times.
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« Reply #15 on: 8 November 2012, 04:44:14 »
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The back reads: "After several days of hard fighting, this Anzac wearing a Hun helmet, is shaving himself with gusto, using an extemporised mirror."
Kind of an interesting image showing a behind-the-lines scene from the soldiers' down time although it appears staged for the camera to show the folks back home.
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« Reply #16 on: 15 November 2012, 15:32:16 »
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Unidentified photo on postcard of a trench/underground dug-out facility.
I assume this is WWI; I assume it's part of a trench system.  I'm not that good at identifying nationality of soldiers all the time--are these German soldiers?
The two on the left appear to almost have an office space.  There is some stonework built up in the center on top of the pile of dirt and a marker/smoke-stack/weather vane is mounted on top.

Who wants to offer some insight as to time, place, nationality, purpose?  Thanks in advance!
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« Reply #17 on: 15 November 2012, 20:33:50 »
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I do guess German, the one at the right rear has a (sry for the description) hat without a sunshield at the front

WWI is logical, customes are clean and the man seem confident and proud

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« Reply #18 on: 15 November 2012, 21:02:10 »
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First glance looks WWi and Germans (at least its early 20th century).

Do you have a high-res version of this? With the pixelations no details of hats, ranks, decorations become visible, but even so my guess would be German or Russian, the latter only a far probability depending on the year this was taken.

Thing in front (the "pile of dirt") looks like an oven to me, kind of improvised bakery (official one looked different: )?

Rattler

<Quoted Image Removed>

Unidentified photo on postcard of a trench/underground dug-out facility.
I assume this is WWI; I assume it's part of a trench system.  I'm not that good at identifying nationality of soldiers all the time--are these German soldiers?
The two on the left appear to almost have an office space.  There is some stonework built up in the center on top of the pile of dirt and a marker/smoke-stack/weather vane is mounted on top.

Who wants to offer some insight as to time, place, nationality, purpose?  Thanks in advance!

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« Reply #19 on: 15 November 2012, 21:04:33 »
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Thanks, Koen and Rattler; I'll be back soon with a higher-res scan to post.
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