The Military => The Military: General Discussion Area => Topic started by: Rattler on 19 March 2009, 23:46:31



Title: Women in the Military - Sexual Abuse
Post by: Rattler on 19 March 2009, 23:46:31
Just ran into this on another forum, I am sure it is a career show stopper for a commander to have such cases and might lead to them ignored.

Any ideas how to confront the problem, especially if they go waivers to enlist convicted rapists (or other criminals)?

Rattler

Quote
CBS
March 18, 2009

CBS Evening News, 6:30 PM

MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ: In Iraq and Afghanistan, the danger isn’t just from the enemy. Female troops also face the threat of sexual abuse by their comrades. The Pentagon says 165 sexual assaults were reported there last year – up 26 percent from the year before.
And as Katie Couric reports, some actions by the military may be making it worse.

KATIE COURIC: It’s a potent environment with female soldiers working and living under hostile conditions with their male counterparts. This soldier, who asked us to call him “Robert,” spent three tours in Iraq as a signal unit leader out of Fort Lewis in Washington State.

ROBERT” [Signal Unit Leader]: For the female soldiers, it was far harder to adjust because not only did they have to deal with combat, mortar rounds, rockets, bullets, they also have to – they also had to put with male soldiers who were away from their families for a year.

COURIC: A decorated soldier in his unit, “Robert” says he went to his command on many occasions after female soldiers had reported they’d been sexually assaulted. But more often than not, nothing was done.

ROBERT”: The last thing a commander wants other than a death in his unit is a sexual harassment or assault case because that makes his command look bad.

COURIC: For Wendy, an idealistic 17-year-old, the military seemed like the answer to her prayers.

WENDY: I was mostly going in for school, but I also was going in to see the world and travel.

COURIC: Deployed as a combat medic at the height of the insurgency, Wendy was thrust into a chaotic and increasingly violent situation. Not long after, she experienced another kind of trauma when she was assaulted by a fellow soldier in her barracks while she was sleeping.

WENDY: He started, like, pushing himself on me. And I wasn’t having it, so I started punching him and I actually kicked in the groin.

COURIC: Afraid to go to her command, she took extra precautions – locking her room with a deadbolt, traveling in pairs. But just weeks later, she found herself fending off the sexual advances of a doctor she worked with in the OR. Again, she didn’t report it.

WENDY: He was a doctor, he was a surgeon. And who were they going to believe?

COURIC: Wendy’s experience is not unusual. Since 2002, the Miles Foundation, a private nonprofit organization that tracks sexual assault within the armed forces, has received nearly 1,200 confidential reports of sexual assaults in the Central Command area of responsibility, which includes Iraq and Afghanistan. Incidents have increased as much as 30 percent a year. Part of the problem for the increase, critics say, is the quality of today’s recruit.
And the military is increasingly issuing something called moral waivers so they can enlist military personnel with felony convictions for crimes like rape and sexual assault.

MICHAEL DOMINGUEZ [Deputy Under Secretary of Defense]: No, we don’t enlist convicted rapists in the armed forces of the United States. If there’s a consensus that kid needs a second chance, I think he’s got it in him to be a soldier, then they’ll let him into the armed forces.

COURIC: In fact, CBS News has learned that both the Army and Marine Corps did issue moral waivers to enlistees with felony convictions for rape and sexual assault – something not acknowledged in this follow-up letter from Secretary Dominguez.

But it’s not just who enters the military, it’s how sex offenders are ultimately punished by the command.
We have documents showing that a private convicted of a rape had a bad conduct discharge suspended so he could deploy to Iraq. How can the U.S. military allow a convicted criminal to go back into a situation where he could easily rape again?

DOMINGUEZ: I don’t – I’m not familiar with this particular case.

COURIC: Have you ever heard of this happening though?

DOMINGUEZ: I have not.

COURIC: The Army says it’s committed to doing better with plans of adding 15 special victim prosecutors and 30 criminal investigators by this summer.

WENDY: We’ve earned our way through the military. We put in our work, and I think we deserve the same amount of respect.

COURIC: It’s a fight Wendy hopes female soldiers can win.

Katie Couric, CBS News, New York.



Title: Re: Women in the Military - Sexual Abuse
Post by: FACman on 20 March 2009, 04:12:19
Rattler sez:
Quote
Any ideas how to confront the problem, especially if they go waivers to enlist convicted rapists (or other criminals)?


First off, the women have to stop being 'victims', If they reported 'ALL' the occurrences, there'd be such an outrage, as to make the Pentagon sit up and pay attention, instead of sweeping it under the rug.

Then, I'd like to see a few of the perps, after 'Due Process', surgically castrated, to set the terms of punishment for the offense, in a way that others are not likely to forget.

Finally, learn a lesson from many armies of the past. Bring some working girls into the picture, in a controlled environment (Bordello), and give these fellows a legitimate outlet for their libidos.

Alas, but my ideas, are unlikely to be seen, beyond the expanses of my imagination and this thread.

J


Title: Re: Women in the Military - Sexual Abuse
Post by: stoffel on 20 March 2009, 10:35:18
Its a thin red line between harrassment and offering your body to get what you want, thats the other side of the story.
There are a lot of cases known in the Dutch army where women used their sexual attractivity to get a better job or get a higher rank.
This resulted 3 years ago in jailtime sentences for the instructors involved, the women in  this case were not even discharged but lowered in rank only.
I know several of them too....dangerous women for your career, because if you dont give them afterwards what they want you can kiss your job farewell.
The biggest problem is to have authorities believe you as a man, because you (most of the times) are seen as the offender.


Title: Re: Women in the Military - Sexual Abuse
Post by: Koen on 20 March 2009, 13:37:25
it's a very old and very modern issue...

they make you horny as hell and when you react you offend them...

[sry for the language and I'm not speaking in general..]

some are real dangers...to your career, marriage and more...

when they finally show up in court they have no make-up and their body is covered 99% with clothes...before they spend 1hr on make-up and had almost no clothes on...

but the male remains the one with the 'weapon', the penetrator...