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Author Topic: Teleporting Tanks CPX AAR  (Read 5437 times)
Rattler
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« on: 4 November 2009, 10:04:13 »
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One of the stranger (nut nevertheless serious) TacOps CPXes run was probably the "Teleporting Tanks" CPX run by James Sterrett on JUL 11, 2002, I have found the main AARs and repuglish them here.

Enjoy,

Rattler
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« Reply #1 on: 4 November 2009, 10:07:24 »
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Teleporting Tanks: Umpire's AAR for TacOps CPX, July 11 2002
James Sterrett

This was probably the most bizarre TacOps CPX ever run. Teleportation is
rare in games - the only ones I can think of are SPI's StarForce: Alpha
Centauri and the later stages of Microprose's X-Com 3: Apocalypse. The
latter's scale is single soldiers and single aliens with personal
teleporters, but the primary use of teleporters is for zipping in to drop
large quantities of explosives into the enemy's lap. StarForce's primary
game module is a star-system-spanning operational wargame, and the tactical
space battle subgame bears little relation to the situation in TacOps.

Two of the players, in particular, really sank their teeth into the issue
of tactics in an army using teleportation with modern equipment. [Why such
a force would bother with modern weapons is another matter. Cool ]


Umpire: James Sterrett

Blue: Corinne Mahaffey
Allan Wotherspoon (unable to play due to severe ISP troubles)

Red: Matt "Rattler" Ohlmer (commander)
John Osborne


Initial briefing, for both sides:

This will be a *very* unusual game and can accommodate at least 5 players
per side (4 companies plus a commander) on the Flaherty map (231). It will
run from 30 to 60 turns.

The actual game stop point will be determined by a die roll.

Each side will get a US battalion task force (4 companies of 2x M-1
platoons, 2x M-2 platoons (with infantry and Javelins), and 1 HQ of 2x M-1
each - but no mortars) and 25 P1 bombs. The objective, for both sides, is
to be in sole possession of Flaherty at the end of the game. Failing that,
each side will gain one point for every minute in which it is in sole
possession of Flaherty.

Where does this go off the deep end?

Magic move will be left on, for all players, throughout the game. This
simulates the use of teleportation devices. All players may use magic move
as much as they want, without restrictions.

The P1 bombs are the team's artillery (why send shells when you can
teleport the explosive?) Blast radii must be preset, but the timing
countdowns are up to the players. Team commanders should let me know by
noon on Thursday what their bomb radii should be; mix-n-match is legal.

Planning:

Blue's planning was somewhat broken because Corinne waited for continuation
of discussions with Allan that suddenly stopped due to his ISP
troubles. She did do a fair amount of thinking about the nature of the
tactics that would be needed. However, a communications mixup left her
thinking the maximum permissible radius for the bombs was 250m, not
1000m. Thus Blue was saddled with relatively weak bombs throughout the game.

Cor's pregame commentary:

-----------
I have this vision of everyone jumping around like demented bunnies. But,
unless the units move every minute, any spotting of them means they will be
shot at the next minute of play. So it might be better not to jump every
minute, on the grounds that if you haven't been seen, you can stick around
until you are, and then move. It also lets you get the drop on anyone who
pops by (after which you'd better move so as not to get shot at). The
greatest danger is probably the first minute after moving. So the best bet
might be a mix of sitters and movers, with more of the former, placed to
overwatch likely drop in points (that is, don't sit in good tactical
positions, sit next to them). They should expect to move locally when
found, so as to still be able to toast off anyone who drops by the tactical
position(s) they are watching. Movers are there to surprise/flush sitters
on the other side on whom we then drop a bomb (or several in a pattern in
the area). Add a third group, that does nothing but spot for artillery and
movers. They are hiding in small groups, and don't open fire, like the
sitters do.

Timely intelligence is going to be critical and a total pain

It would be worth having a few infantry units go to ground in the area and
try to ride out any enemy (or our own) bombs. If we are to deny Flaherty
to the enemy, we (and they) are likely to drop the occasional town-clearing
bomb just on principle, in case anyone is sitting tight there. Should the
units on the ground move around trying to find enemies doing the same? Or
sit tight?
------------

Matt Ohlmer
, on Red delved especially deeply into the tactics, and did a
better job of codifying them into the following minor treatise, "Strategies
and Tactics in the Teleporting Army":


------------
As we approach tonight's game I have pondered the strategical and tactical
consequences of having our and enemy units sport inherent teleport
capabilities.

Obviously this changes approach to recon, attack and defense quite a bit: We
as well as the enemy can be everywhere instantly, delaying actions are
impossible, all this creates a permanent tactical surprise situation. Here is
how I see the different tasks/attitudes influenced by that:

a) Recon

Recon in the traditional Army intends to provide the commander with
information about location, composition and strength of enemy forces to enable
him to react accordingly.

In the Teleporting Army this is possible only within certain limitations: As
the enemy can change his location instantly, the information about his
location yields not much value for the commander, as his reactions to the
information will most probably be too late and in the wrong spot.

Still, there are areas where traditional recon might play a role (at least on
a confined map as in our game tonight), as the enemy will have to assemble his
units somewhere in order to have access to them and teleport them, a thorough
search of rear areas will probably help locate them and prepare an attack
against those AAs.

In the battlezone, though, recon will be very different: A fight between
teleporting units whose mission is known to the other side is mainly a game of
minds: Who can predict first how the enemy commander thinks and what his plans
are wins.

So, recon against teleporting units must try and *predict* enemy location and
strength by searching for patterns in deployment (Example: Enemy always
positions units in the EAST of Flaherty, following a 4 min rhythm, or: We spot
an enemy unit that keeps relocating every minute, always back and forth over
the same kilometer). Those patterns are almost certainly to evolve over time
and under stress and might be exploited for preparing coordinated attacks.


b) Counter Recon

Counter recon in the Teleporting Army is a bunch of methods to mislead enemy
when his observing units search for AAs and for deployment patterns.

The first is done by relocating frequently and assemble in terrain with short
LOS to reduce the risk of getting spotted (i.e. assemble in woods, change
those locs frequently).

The latter is probably best done by introducing pure chance into the
deployment schedules, i.e. roll dice for when and where to deploy. This will
not allow enemy to make educated guesses about future deployment locations and
timings. If you don't know where you will be in the next minute, enemy wont
either...:->


c) Defense

Against an enemy permanently threatening surprise attacks defense will have to
rely on permanently being prepared:

- All units at all times must be deployed in a defensive posture against a 360
degree attack, with inf dismounted and the units of a pln covering each other
and all angles of attack.

- Units must be dispersed, in our case all vehicle plns at least 600 mtrs
apart, inf at least 1200 mtrs apart to survive surprise bomb attacks

- SOPs must be in effect, e.g. to break an engagement immediately under smoke
cover


d) Attack

Teleportation gives us something that had to be achieved in the traditional
army by lots of training and co-ordination: We now can bring fire of attacking
units on the targets in perfect synchronization and simultaneously.

So, attack against presumed or suspected enemy positions has the highest
chance of success when we attack enemy from several angles at the same time
and in significant strength.

If in suitable terrain the attacking units should always be accompanied by
long range overwatch from a different location.
--------------

Matt set the Red bombs such that 20 had a 1000m blast radius and 5 had a
600m blast radius, and figured out locations where Red forces could be
deployed into the easternmost or westernmost edges of Flaherty while the
rest of the city was hit by a teleported bomb.

Both sides drew the same basic conclusions:

- Most units sit tight, hidden, awaiting the moment to strike
- Another force combs the map looking for enemy forces to hit
- A small trickle of forces has to flow into the city to deny it to the enemy

The battle proceeded in three distinct engagements separated by extensive
periods of recon, with small units fighting - and being blown to
smithereens by bombs - in Flaherty the whole time.

The first engagement, in the northwest corner of the map, began when Red
spotted a pair of Blue M-1s sitting quietly and decided to move in one of
their strike forces of Bradleys and M-1s to engage it. The Blue tanks had
been spotted by a Red Javelin ATGM team. Anticipating the arrived of the
strike force, the Javelin team was ordered to open fire; but the plan
miscarried when the strike force commander arrived too far away to spot the
Blue tanks. The Javelins fired, but missed, alerting Blue to the
plot. Blue, however, only knew of the Javelins, and deployed forces to
fire on them. Over the next several turns, the battle proceeded in this
radiating manner, with forces deploying in to attack positions the enemy
had previously occupied or ones the enemy was thought to be moving to. The
engagement ended when Blue decided it had done all the damage it was likely
to, and left, just as Red set off a 1000m bomb in the area Blue vacated.

The second engagement occurred in the other corner (southeast). After a
few minor skirmishes in which Blue tanks teleported in on top of Red
infantry units and wiped them out, Blue found some Red armor and teleported
in its ambush force. There were no communications mixups, but Blue as not
aware of the full extent of Red's deployment. Blue did deploy various
overwatch forces, resulting in a brief general engagement before both sides
departed to avoid the bomb explosions which duly arrived.

Both sides used the first 30 minutes to try to find the enemy forces and
ambush them with either bombs or mechanized forces, seeking to gain a
decisive advantage in the battle for Flaherty when the uncertain game-end
period arrived. Neither succeeded. Red used a novel tactic in which a
cloud of infantry units steadily swept through several areas, but Blue was
generally not present and the sweep missed those Blue units that were
present due to insufficient density.

The third engagement began in Flaherty after 30 minutes, but to get there
we need to go over the events in Flaherty.

Blue initially deployed 8 infantry squads into Flaherty. Red deployed a
pair of 1000m bombs, which wiped out the Blue squads (and all of the
civilian markers I'd out into town to track civilian losses.) Blue's error
here was overcommitment in the early stages of the fighting, and the lesson
was learnt; neither side thereafter sent in more than a squad or two at a
time to try to control Flaherty, until the 30 minutes were up.

Blue forgot about Flaherty for about 10 turns, which allowed Red to build
up a substantial lead in points for free. After Blue remembered to contest
possession, Blue gained 3 points and Red gained 4. The battle went through
a series of seesaw jumps and counterjumps with each side trying to guess
where the other might be next and place either a squad or a bomb in that
location. Enough bombs went off in Flaherty to reduce the place to a very
fine powder.

When minute 30 rolled around, both teams were aware that the game would end
at random sometime in the next 30 minutes. (I rolled dice and determined
the game would end after minute 36.)

Both sides therefore began to concentrate forces in and around the
town. Red committed one major error at this point, accidentally
teleporting a primed 1000m bomb to the same location as their Javelin team
rally point. All were present, none survived.

Red did a good job of moving its forces to one end or the other of Flaherty
at random, dropping a large bomb on the other end in the process. Blue
tended to stick to the middle of town, trying to gain better shots on Red's
forces, but consequently remaining more predictable. As the game ended,
much of blue's mechanized units died to a pair of Red bombs, but Flaherty's
ruins were still contested.

Lessons learned:

Player's pregame theses on the Teleporting Army were generally borne out.

When fighting an open battle (the first 30 minutes, outside Flaherty):

Units teleporting into an area need to ensure that their arrival is
unheralded, and that they arrived deployed in a formation that allows
immediate mutual support in the event of contact with the enemy.

Forces in contact should disengage immediately before the enemy teleports
in a bomb.

Infantry makes good scouts, because it can see armored units farther away
than they can see the infantry. However, infantry tends to die when it
gets into any serious firefight.

Standing still gives the enemy the opportunity to deploy an ambush against
your forces. Keep moving, and keep moving in tactically sound
deployments. This is a non-trivial task.

When fighting a pitched battle (control of Flaherty):

Both sides know enemy forces will be present. Therefore, bombs will be
present. 1000m bomb blasts are essentially tactical nuclear weapons. You
must plan your deployments to stay out of range of your own blasts'
effective radius, and to maneuver to prevent the enemy being able to
effectively predict your locations without blanketing the entire area (and
thus denying themselves control of the area as well.) These forces that
are zipping around must still deploy in a tactically sound manner so they
can effectively engage any enemy forces spotted.

Both sides concluded it was necessary to deploy massive forces into
Flaherty at the end of the game. This may not have been a correct
decision. The attrition tactics of the previous 30 minutes had been
largely successful in the negative goal of denying the enemy control of
Flaherty. If either side had continued the same troop commitment coupled
with an increased bomb commitment, that side might have avoided significant
losses and thus come out ahead in the long term in attrition without
relinquishing control of the city. This might also lead to a radiating
battle away from the city as forces deployed and counterdeployed to snipe
at enemy forces which were deployed on the outskirts of Flaherty in order
to avoid both friendly and enemy bomb blasts.


I'm looking forward to see the player's AARs on this one. Cool

Matt Ohlmer suggested running the game again, but with a stationary
Teleport unit and one-way teleportation. This would be interesting, but it
is fraught with potential for accidental player error. It's all too easy
to change a unit's location when magic move is permitted, and it is not
possible to restrict magic move to only a few units. Thus such a game
would impose extra demands on the players to be extra-careful to magic move only those units that could legally shift. I suspect that would slow the
game down substantially. [The game in this case ran at 1 minute of orders
for each one minute turn, eventually moving to 2 minutes when Corinne,
alone on Blue, needed more time to keep up with the two players on
Red. The game started a bit after 8.30 PM and ended at around
10PM. That's a ration of 2.5 real minutes to every 1 game minute. Note
that TacOps V3 and prior CPXes (run manually by the umpire) hardly ever
approached this rate of play; 3:1 was considered quite fast.]
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« Reply #2 on: 4 November 2009, 10:10:19 »
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Teleporting Tanks: Red CO's AAR for TacOps CPX, July 11 2002, Matt "Rattler" Ohlmer

As James Sterrett´s AAR already has most of how the game went I will
refrain from repeating briefings etc and just go into some detail and fill
in some gaps from RED´s point of view.

When James announced the CPX I was intrigued by the underlying ideas and
decided to participate despite the unholy hours the cpx was played for us
Europeans (game start was 0230L here, had to get up in the middle of the
night; as I stated during the the game thats something I had not done since
the Muhammad Ali/Joe Frazier fight in the 70´s...:-> ).

Before starting to plan I had run some tests on bombs with following
results:

- No terrain masking helps against bombs, they affect high ground from low
ground within their explosion radius as well as low ground behind a hill in
the way.

- no hiding behind LOS blocks, like woods, towns etc. The bomb affects
everything within its radius, boom.

- bombs have the same effect in town terrain as in rough 2

- bombs do NOT kill other bombs (I had hoped they would take some enemy
bombs with them when exploding)

- The effect of the bombs depends largely on the target type, vehicles are
much less effected than infantery. All vehicles are more or less affected
the same, tanks suffer equally as APCs.

- the bomb effect decreases with distance of the target unit from ground
zero, if you combine that with the smaller vulnerability of vehicles you
get the folowing pattern (tables to be viewed in monotype font like Courier
or Monaco; S = Supressed, NE = No Effect):


BOMB vs Vehicles (percentage destroyed + Supression)
----------------------------------------------------

50 200 400 600 800 1000 (Bomb Radius Nominal)
Dist.
0 75+S 100 100 100 100 100
140 NE Blink 40+S 75+S 75+S 92+S
270 NE NE Blink S 50+S 25+S
410 NE NE Blink Blink S 25+S
560 NE NE NE NE Blink Blink
700 NE NE NE NE NE Blink
840 NE NE NE NE NE Blink
1000 NE NE NE NE NE NE
Target
Distnc

Things become much different when it goes vs infantery (note I changed one
radius to 270 mtrs):

BOMB vs Inf (percentage destroyed + Supression)
-----------------------------------------------

50 270 400 600 800 1000 (Bomb Radius Nominal)
Dist.
0 100 100 100 100 100 100
140 NE 80+S 100 100 100 100
270 NE S 30+S 90+S 100 100
410 NE NE S 30+S 65+S 100
560 NE NE NE 5+S 30+S 70+S
700 NE NE NE NE 5+S 30+S
840 NE NE NE NE NE 10+S
1000 NE NE NE NE NE S
Target
Distnc

Going with these tables we decided to set our bomb radius to 1000 mtrs and
some (5) bombs to 600 mtrs for use inside Flaherty.

My basic problem was that I obviously had not read the first announcement
for the cpx well enough, so until about 4 hours before battle I was not
aware of the type of forces we (and the enemy) would have, whether we would
have armor, inf or mech inf. Consequently, I had to make plans in a very
general fashion and had not much time to refine them until game start. Had
I kept and read the original announcement I am sure we would have fared
much better in the CPX as I would have asked my teammate John to do some
practice rounds before game.

Like it was, when I became aware of our force structure I prepared
following OPORD proposal for our forces:

-----------------------------------------------------------
OPORD proposal

We are tasked to take and hold FLAHERTY in sector 23 within a time span of
between 30 and 60 minutes. We know that enemy has the same mission.

Whoever has sole possesion of FLAHERTY at game end wins. Also, for every
turn of sole possesion of FLAHERTY before game end the side that meets this
condidition gains 1 point (I assume that in case of a draw, i.e. nobody or
both occupy FLAHERTY at game end, the points decide game winner).

Our forces as well as enemy forces will be equipped with the new
teleporters, i.e. can move everywhere on the map instantly.

We are given 4 coys of Brads and 4 coys of tanks to fulfill the mission, as
support we have been given 25 teleportable bombs, 20 of them with a blast
radius of 1000 mtrs, 5 of them with a blast radius of 600 mtrs.

We expect enemy to have a similar force. Enemy bomb blast radii are
unknown,

Plan:

As we as well as the enemy are new to this type of warfare, we will
concentrate in the beginning of the game on finding out how enemy uses his
teleporters and try to discern patterns which make it possible for us to
deal some devastating blows to his force structure. At the same time we
will deny enemy finding patterns of our movements or attitudes by
introducing die rolls to decide between possible alternative COAs. Our
Javelin dismounts are tasked with this job, as they have a very low
signature and can jump close to enemy units w/o getting spotted and can see
through bomb explosion induced smoke.

Parallel we will attempt to have at least one unit inside FLAHERTY at all
times to have an eye there as well as to secure the possible point after
each turn. Our infantry dismounts will be tasked with this job, one or more
of them will jump to FLAHERTY every turn, either to the westmost or to the
eastmost point of it (die roll). The alternative to this strategy is to
wipe FLAHERTY clear of enemy troops (2x Bomb), which we will do
occasionally to not present a pattern of action (die roll).

When we have established patterns in enemy use of teleporters and
organisation of his troops we will try to anticipate those movemnts and
attack enemy in force with our strike formations. These strike formations
are formed of one tank coy and one or more bradley overwatch plns.

If we dont find any enemy move and deploment patterns we will attack
strategically interesting points with our strike formations and secure
them.

After 30 minutes game time we will attempt to keep FLAHERTY free of enemy
troops while occupying it, i.e. employ a bomb every turn.

Execution:

At game start our strike formations will distruibute in woods with a
distance of at least 1200 mtrs between each pln. This is to make them less
vulnerable against enemy recon attempts and against enemy bomb detonations.

The Javelins will distribute over the map and jump one quadrant each turn
until they spot enemy. When enemy gets spotted, javelin stays in place to
report enemy reactions. Javelins will start on the west side of map and
jump closer to Flaherty as the game proceeds.

We will start the game with two bomb explosions in Flaherty to clean it of
enemy units and to find out whether he had units deployed there
(secondaries). If enemy uses bombs at game start as well we will get a clue
about his blast radii.

The strike formations will attack known or suspected enemy positions always
as a coy, the three platoons forming a triangle of variable side length (up
to commander, depends on terrain). The idea here is to attack
simultaneously from at least three directions. Any return fire should be
dealt with by the overwatch units that go with each strike formation.

The unpredictable occupation/withdrawal rhythm in FLAHERTY requires good
coordination of commanders: Everytime we use two 1km bombs to "clean"
Flaherty our own units have to withdraw to at least 2 km away from town to
avoid fratricide.

END OPORD

------------------------------------------------

How it went:

At game start all seemed to go as planned: We encountered some enemy units
in their rear areas in the NW quadrants of the map, after waiting one turn
to see whether they moved we decided to attack them.

Johns strike force moved in, but not close enough to the enmy tanks to open
fire on them (he positioned his attack force about 600 mtrs away from them
qand they only were visible at 400). In the course of the resulting fight
we took heavy losses, as our overwatch units were not in a tactically sound
position and fell to return fire from enemy overwatch units.

The second battle ensued when I was afraid that enemy would by chance jump
on my stacked inf teams (they were all in the SW most corner of the map)
and take them out with a bomb. I decided to distribute them over some 10
sqkm and happened to spot a lot of enemy units that obvioulsy had learned
from us and were looking for our units in our rear areas.

Again, we moved in to strike, this time the strike force went close
enough,m but again the enemy overwatch units took out most of our strike
forces. It was during those two enegagements that we lost most units.

I decided to close ranges in my recon force and had all Javelins sweep
sectors of the map in 500 mtrs distance. We never found enemy units (James
said our ounits were too far apart, but I had figured with 500 mtrs
distance to each other they would have a good chance to spot enemy).

After that, at about 30 minutes into game, we started to go for Flaherty
seriously, and things improved a lot. We had established that enemy only
used bombs of 250 mtrs blast radius (destruction risk for our vehicles
within 150 mtrs), which would not effect our vehicles over a big distance,
also it seemed enemy had run out of bombs (I had kept a count and whiloe it
was not precise due to me dropping from game for a turn, I had counted more
than 20).

All this gave us a clear advantage and we managed to deal some heavy blow
to tenemy in Flaherty In this phase coordination with John was perfect, we
only needed a few words every time to relocate our entire force ("west",
"east"). Had I not commited the error of blowing away the majority of our
Javelins: when drag-selecting them to evac from our own bomb (as it turned
out the bomb was within the rectangle and went with them), we would have
been much more effective, but even with this blow to our overwatch we did
well.

I do not cocnur with James that we would have been better off following our
original strategy after minute 30: As far as we knew, game could end any
minute, so probably no chance to correct errors, also we knew enemy would
go for Flaherty and try to hold it, and, since we had not encountered enemy
in other areas of the map anymore, going therte as well seemed (and still
seems) a good idea.

In the enbd James declared us the winners because we had scored more
occupation points, but I thin k a bit of luck was involved here.

Lessons learned:

- when moving strike formations have them deploy in sound tactical
formation, i.e. overwatch deployed as during any regualar engagement

- we should have priority targeted for enemy units in our various strike
force elements (Brads for APCs, tanks for Javelins)

- we should have attacked from various angles once spotting an enemy unit,
this didnt work throughout game

- training: We should have run some trainging runs just before game within
the team to make sure we were all singing from the same sheet. I had
expected our attack formations to always deploy in triangle formation
within a 400 mtrs radius of the unit we wanted to attack and overwatch at
least 2000 mtrs away, if we had tried that out before we would not have had
to adjust during the game with all the relatedd stress/comms problems.

In all, it was the fun I expected when James announced the CPX, as well
duirng planning as during the actual game. I want to especially thank John
Osborne for being such a great team mate, his patience with my slow recon
efforts and with the big errors I commited, it was a lot of fun to
communicate with him and run this strange scenario the way we did.

Matt "Rattler" Ohlmer
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« Reply #3 on: 5 November 2009, 01:56:59 »
ReplyReply

That looks like a heck of alot more than 10 minutes a day.

Good Hunting.

MR
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« Reply #4 on: 5 November 2009, 02:57:14 »
ReplyReply

? What do you mean?

This was *not* a MBX, it was a live multiplayer net game of approximatly 80 minutes duration (hence the friendly fire incident under stress as reported).

From the umpire AAR:
Quote
The game in this case ran at 1 minute of orders
for each one minute turn, eventually moving to 2 minutes when Corinne,
alone on Blue, needed more time to keep up with the two players on
Red. The game started a bit after 8.30 PM and ended at around
10PM. That's a ration of 2.5 real minutes to every 1 game minute.

From my AAR:
Quote
Had I not commited the error of blowing away the majority of our
Javelins: when drag-selecting them to evac from our own bomb (as it turned
out the bomb was within the rectangle and went with them), we would have
been much more effective, but even with this blow to our overwatch we did
well.


Rattler
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« Reply #5 on: 6 November 2009, 17:20:02 »
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Steve,

Like Rattler said this was something different.
A cpx basically is very simple, below are the major aspects.

Two teams are formed.

a) Umpire sends team CO an assignment.
b) CO receives a map with units on it.
c) CO makes plan and discuss it with team.
d) CO sends order to Umpire
e) umpire plays out game in sequences of 1, 2, 5 ,10 minute turns or any duration he chooses.
f) start again with item c after each turn played, adjusting and/or change orders Smiley

Only the disscussion part will take somewhat longer, the rest plays out very fast and smooth.

Henk

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My topics are about my personal opinion, my thoughts and what I think. They do not reflect the official opinion of the ministry of defense of the Netherlands.
Rattler
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« Reply #6 on: 6 November 2009, 20:26:14 »
ReplyReply

Steve,

Like Rattler said this was something different.
A cpx basically is very simple, below are the major aspects.

Two teams are formed.

a) Umpire sends team CO an assignment.
b) CO receives a map with units on it.
c) CO makes plan and discuss it with team.
d) CO sends order to Umpire
e) umpire plays out game in sequences of 1, 2, 5 ,10 minute turns or any duration he chooses.
f) start again with item c after each turn played, adjusting and/or change orders Smiley

Only the disscussion part will take somewhat longer, the rest plays out very fast and smooth.


THe big difference is that the players all run the game on their own computers and just connect to the host (umpire) via net in a CPX. Order exchange is done by the game engine, time pressure is high (as umpire in a CPX I usually try to match one minute game time to 1 minutes orders time per turn, i.e. witht he exchange and exectuion try to achieve a 2.5 ratio RL vs. game time.

In an MBX you wont need the game, as it is only running on one (umpire´s) machine, orders are exchanged in written and time pressures are virtual.

Rattler
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"War does not determine who is right, war determines who is left...": The Rattler Way Of Life (thanks! to Solideo)... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9v3Vyr5o2Q
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