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Author Topic: British 18th Century Military Uniforms  (Read 37482 times)
Alan65
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« on: 30 July 2010, 19:18:47 »
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Following come from a 1947 series of Curteich postcards showing British military uniforms.  Many--but not all--involve the US Revolutionary War, 1775-1783.


Battalion corporal, 9th Regiment, in drill order.  The 9th Rgmt, raised in 1685 as Colonel Henry Cornwall's Regiment was nicknamed "The fighting 9th" (how original!)
According to the information on the back of this postcard, corporals had a silk eqaulette on the right shoulder of speckled cord.  The summer dress was short balck canvas gaiters or splatterdashes, and white stockings.  yellow facings, white wasitcoats, breeches and belts.  This card also shows the regimental lace white with two black stripes.  After 1777, the waist (bayonet) belt was transferred to the right shoulder.  Also note the "IX" in the gold belt buckle.
I have 19 postcards in this series, all of which are signed by the artist A. R. Cattley; two are dated in the signature 1946 although the Curteich number indicates a 1947 publication date.
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Alan65
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« Reply #1 on: 1 August 2010, 18:30:11 »
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Officer of the 20th Regiment wearing summer dress short black canvas gaiters or splatterdashes, white stockings, yellow facings, white wasitcoat breaches and belt.  regimental lace, white with a red and black stripe.  He is pictured carryinga musket so at a distance he resembles the other ranks and so stands less chance of being picked off my American sharpshooters. (the red sash around his waist might give him away, though!)


This postcard shows a private of the 20th in full marching order wearing winter dress.  The boots are higher and his pack is visible.

The 20th Regiment was raised in 1688 as Colonel Sir richard Peyton's Regiment; it gained reknown in the Battle of Minden on August 1st, 1759, and became known as 'The Minden Boys' after that.
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Alan65
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« Reply #2 on: 4 August 2010, 00:13:48 »
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Grenadier in Full Marching Order, 21st Regiment of Foot, aka Royal North British Fusiliers; winter dress with the long boots. Note match box on cross-belt over heart.

Private in Drill or Battle Order of the 24th Regiment.

Battalion Sergeant of the same 24th Regiment.  He's distinguished here by the crimson sash around his waist and that he has no gun.

Battalion Private in Drill Order of the 26th Regiment.  The 26th was raised in 1689 in Scotland as Colonel the Earl of Angus's Regiment and later known as "The Cameronians."

Officer of the 29th Regiment, with espontoon, in Review Order. The 29th was involved in early disturbances in Boston in 1770 (known to Americans as "The Boston Massacre.")
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Alan65
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« Reply #3 on: 19 August 2010, 00:47:32 »
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31st Regiment Private in full marching order.  Winter uniform as seen by the high boots; the blanket behind him on his pack took the place of an overcoat when on gurad duty.

33rd Regiment private in summer dress.

34th Regiment private in drill or battle order dress. (the dead body in the background is a bit much!)

All of these postcards are from the same series issued in 1947.
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« Reply #4 on: 19 August 2010, 12:12:32 »
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very nice!
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Alan65
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« Reply #5 on: 5 September 2010, 21:23:40 »
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Private in 42nd Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch) at the end of the War of Independence c.1783.  At the beginning of the war, this unit wore kilts which weren't as durable or helpful in the North American woods.

A private in the Light Company 46th British Regiment in summer dress.  Of note is the red feather in the peak of his cap; the Americans vowed to show this unit no quarter and they were especially singled out so the unit decided to show its scorn for the rebels by dyeing their feathers red so that they'd become even more distinctive. (That's the story, anyway!)

Grenadier company soldier, 47th Regiment, in Winter Dress uniform.  This unit was in Quebec in 1759 when General Wolfe fell.

Battalion Corporal 53rd Regiment in Drill Order.  The epaulette on his right shoulder denotes he's a corporal.
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