NCO Club: Off Topic Discussions => The Chambers: Political Discussion Board => Topic started by: Rattler on 8 February 2011, 13:06:13



Title: USAF: Guilt by Association?
Post by: Rattler on 8 February 2011, 13:06:13
Frigthening take of the USAF command in a guideline for accessing WikiLeaks (http://www.fas.org/sgp/news/2011/02/afmc-020311.html) for airmen and their relatives (highlighting by me):

Quote
According to AFMC's legal office, Air Force members -- military or civilian -- may not legally access WikiLeaks at home on their personal, non-governmental computers, either.

"To do so would not only violate the SECAF guidance on this issue, a violation of which subjects the violator to prosecution for dereliction of duty or for engaging in prejudicial/service discrediting conduct, it would also subject the violator to prosecution for violation of espionage under the Espionage Act," they said.


Read: You face a potential death penalty if you read WikiLeaks at home as an airman.

So far, so bad, but worse is to come, "guilt by association" is implemented, for me a fragrant violation of most any human right we in Western countries believe to hold true: The same goes for all your relatives:

Quote
..."if a family member of an Air Force employee accesses WikiLeaks on a home computer, the family member may be subject to prosecution for espionage under U.S. Code Title 18 Section 793. The Air Force member would have an obligation to safeguard the information under the general guidance to safeguard classified information."


Read: Your kids, wives, parents, uncles etc. also face a potential death penalty if they access WikiLeaks in private, and you are responsible to prevent that.

I can only hope somebody realizes the absurdness of this and the impact it has on personal freedom and cancels this guidance instantly...

Rattler


Title: Re: UASF: Guilt by Association?
Post by: MontyB on 8 February 2011, 13:32:08
I think you will find that it is more designed to scare than anything else as it would be almost unenforcible, for the most part anything posted in the public domain is fair game even if it is placed there illegally.

Providing information to Wikileaks on the other hand may be an offense but I suspect any attempt to enforce a ban on reading the site will lead to it being judged "unconstitutional".