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Author Topic: Belgian political continuing saga  (Read 1326 times)
Koen
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Belgium

Location: Belgium
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« on: 8 July 2011, 18:13:06 »
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more then a year after the elections we still have no new government  hdbng
for people who are interested: Belgium is a confederation of north and south with a splitting proces started in the late '60s
many departments have splitted and most things have now a northern and southern department

the big issue is what to do with the taxes from Belgian people.... you get 1.000.000€ taxes from Belgian people buth how do you divide that number?

we had all kinds of political scouts, pre-formers and other titles but nothing worked so far...

both in the north & south we had 1 political party who came out of the elections with overwhelming numbers and those 2 parties can't see to agree on a text to start negotiations....

today the northern party said NO to another text written by the leader of the victorious southern party....

the problem now is that the leader of the S party has offered his dismissal with the king accepted and now NOBODY knows anymore what options are still available....

all kinds of stuff has been tried and scouted

in better English:
Quote
The 2007–2011 Belgian political crisis is an enduring period of tense communal relations and political instability in Belgium rooted in the differing opinions on state reform, and in the continued existence of the controversial electoral district of Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde (BHV). Parties from the Dutch-speaking Flemish Community are in general strongly in favour for a devolution of powers to the communities and regions, and the splitting of the unconstitutional BHV district, while French-speaking French Community of Belgium is generally in favour of retaining the status quo. No new government has been formed in the 390 days since the general election on 13 June 2010.

The crisis broke out in the summer of 2007, following the electoral victory of the alliance of Flemish Christian Democrats and separatists, who supported a wide-reaching state reform and the immediate split of BHV. After 194 days of often heated negotiations, parties finally succeeded in forming a new government. In December 2008, another crisis related to the Fortis case, erupted, again destabilising the country and resulting in the resignation of Belgian Prime Minister Yves Leterme. The new Herman Van Rompuy-led government brought a brief period of fragile stability, but ended when Van Rompuy left his office to become the first full-term President of the European Council. The succeeding Leterme II government fell in April 2010 over the lack of progress on resolving the BHV issue.

New elections were held in June 2010, where the separatist and conservative New Flemish Alliance won a landslide victory in Flanders, while the pro-unity Socialist Party won the elections in French-speaking Belgium. Due to the major differences between the two winning parties on a community and social-economic level, government negotiations have already gone on for 390 days, breaking the world government formation record of 249 days, previously set by Iraq in 2010. Leterme remains Prime Minister, leading a caretaker government for the time being.

Federal elections

An early election was held on 13 June, 2010, resulting in a majority for the New Flemish Alliance (N-VA) in the Flemish-speaking areas and the Socialist Party (PS) in the French-speaking Belgium. Nationally the two parties were almost even with 27 seats for the N-VA and 26 for the PS, the remaining seats being split between ten other parties. No agreement could be reached among the parties on a coalition to form a new government. As of June 2011, the country continued to be governed by an interim government.



and an explaining video

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