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Author Topic: The Money of War  (Read 173447 times)
Alan65
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« Reply #160 on: 21 July 2010, 19:15:13 »
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The Netherlands 20 gulden banknote; this one is dated 19 March, 1941.  Queen Emma is at right.  I like old sailing ships so this note is especially attractive to me.

10-gulden note of June, 1943.  The girl at right is from a Moreelse painting c.17th century--also an attractive banknote.

The 1938 2 1/2 gulden 'silver note' from the Netherlands was in use when WWII started.  I think this note is like a US silver certificate in that it says there's 2 and a half gulden in silver deposited in the Bank of the Netherlands.  (does it say you can get silver for it at any time, like the US silver certificate? )
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Alan65
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« Reply #161 on: 21 July 2010, 19:20:59 »
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This is the 20-peso denomination of the 1944 Treasury Emergency Currency Certificate Issue by the Philippine government.
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the_13th_redneck
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« Reply #162 on: 22 July 2010, 03:56:05 »
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Can anyone tell me why they issued pay certificates instead of real money?
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« Reply #163 on: 22 July 2010, 07:18:56 »
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Can anyone tell me why they issued pay certificates instead of real money?


In Vietnam, I believe it was done to keep 'greenbacks' off the Black Market. The occasional changing series of the MPCs was to penalize their unauthorized use by civilians, since at changeover, only military personnel could exchange the old notes for the new ones. This left untold, virtually worthless notes in the hands of the black marketeers.

Thats my take on it, from the 'scuttlebutt' we heard while in country.
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Alan65
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« Reply #164 on: 22 July 2010, 18:26:53 »
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Can anyone tell me why they issued pay certificates instead of real money?


In Vietnam, I believe it was done to keep 'greenbacks' off the Black Market. The occasional changing series of the MPCs was to penalize their unauthorized use by civilians, since at changeover, only military personnel could exchange the old notes for the new ones. This left untold, virtually worthless notes in the hands of the black marketeers.

Thats my take on it, from the 'scuttlebutt' we heard while in country.


That's the official reason as well.  If you notice the dates of issue and withdrawal, it was often roughly at one year intervals but not always.  The old notes became worthless over-night and without warning.  Would you use 'money' like that?  Authorized personnel didn't have to worry about it; civilians and black marketeers did.  A soldier wouldn't want US dollars in his pocket, anyway--say, FACMan:  did you even carry a wallet all the time?
Now, I imagine the an MPC would have more value on the black market when the new series first came out but as time went by they became less and less desirable to anyone but authorized users.  Also, if MPCs were the only kind of currency a soldier had in his pockets, he was a bit limited in what he could buy--officially sanctioned items were easier to buy than, oh, say, illegal items . . .
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« Reply #165 on: 22 July 2010, 19:37:30 »
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FACMan:  did you even carry a wallet all the time?


Yes I did. Where else was I going to carry my money (~ $300-$400 MPC (gambling money) & 10-20 $1 Greenbacks (Greenbacks were emergency money, worth a lot more on Black Market than MPC))   and lets not forget the pictures of my GF? Your wallet was your own little corner of the world. A place where you could remember that there was another world beyond this one of pain, misery and death. I didnt know anyone who didnt have a wallet.
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Alan65
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« Reply #166 on: 22 July 2010, 20:22:11 »
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The 2- and 5-zloty denomination banknotes of Poland.  Issued by the Emission Bank of Poland--a nazi 'puppet' bank--these notes were issued 1 August, 1941.
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« Reply #167 on: 22 July 2010, 20:30:39 »
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The 1918 25-ruble Government Credit Note of the interim government set up between the fall of the Tsar and the Communist Party take-over. 


Here is the 3-ruble State Treasury Note from Russia which came out a bit after the top one.

I show the front and back of these 2 notes to show the beauty of the top note--it's really stunning--and to show the common design element of all non-Communist Russia money and stamps:  the double-headed eagle which represented the Imperial family and thus Imperial Russia.
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« Reply #168 on: 22 July 2010, 20:36:35 »
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This is the 1-ruble Credit Note from the 'Far Eastern Republic', a government set up on the eastern edge of Lake Baikal stretching toward the east until it ran into the various other 'governments' set up around Vladivostok and the Pacific in the far east of Siberia.  The printing is cruder and the paper quality lower than a lot of earlier money shown above.
US troops did get as far west as this area when occupying eastern Siberia in 1918-1920.
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Alan65
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« Reply #169 on: 22 July 2010, 20:41:19 »
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The design of the 1 krona banknote from Sweden didn't change--except for the date printed in the upper left and right--between 1914 and 1940.  This note is dated 1918.  The 5-kroner note was the same from 1918 to 1952 but the 100-kroner didn't change from 1918-1954!
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« Reply #170 on: 22 July 2010, 20:49:18 »
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This brings us up-to-date on my collection of paper money used in wartime.  If anyone is interested in the whole collection, see my Flickr account (alanp_photo) which shows nearly all of it including banknotes which fall outside of this rather large sub-collection of The Money of War.
I am continuously adding to my collection and when I get a large enough batch, I'll add more images here.  Thanks for looking!
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« Reply #171 on: 23 July 2010, 15:17:48 »
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seriously great stuff!
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« Reply #172 on: 20 November 2010, 01:04:08 »
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 Brede lach So... I have some things that would go along with your collection... I don't really know what they are, but I have alot of the same WWII French/Belgium and German including the stuff made in Boston. It was great that you shared them with everyone and gave a description. Thank you. I'm going to share the site with my kids.  Here are some pretty ladies for you... not the greatest scan, but if you have setting advice, I can redo.


* scan0001.jpg (3316.93 KB, 1731x2163 - viewed 444 times.)
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Alan65
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« Reply #173 on: 20 November 2010, 02:55:37 »
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thanks for sharing, harrisr! 
I don't have either of those Luxembourg notes, very nice!  On the 50f note, there is a serial number on the back; is the prefix letter 'A' or a later letter?  (the 'A's are a bit more rare.)

My images here are all linked from my Flickr account so I use one of the 'share this picture' functions found there with each image to embed some of the code which automatically shows the banknotes how you see them here.  I'd love to see more!  If you want some help identifying any of the ones you don't know about let me know, too.
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Alan65
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« Reply #174 on: 27 March 2011, 19:57:21 »
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50 schilling note issued in 1944 by the Allied Military Authority; similar to the 1 schilling shown in reply #2, above.
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« Reply #175 on: 27 March 2011, 19:59:54 »
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This 10-mark note from Germany is dated 1924 but was issued in the mid-1930s and re-issued in 1945 with a different watermark on the left edge. 
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« Reply #176 on: 6 November 2011, 00:15:28 »
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Hi, I just discovered this place.  I have a few wartime notes, mostly the common and cheap ones: for me it's just a hobby, if I see a note I can afford I will buy it. 

I have seen plenty of notes for Austria - Allierte Militaerbehoerde - and for the US zone of Germany, but never anything at all for the French and British zones.  Were any notes ever issued?  Can anyone point me at URLs with pix thereof?

Thanks,

Richard
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Alan65
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« Reply #177 on: 6 November 2011, 01:13:39 »
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I have seen plenty of notes for Austria - Allierte Militaerbehoerde - and for the US zone of Germany, but never anything at all for the French and British zones.  Were any notes ever issued?  Can anyone point me at URLs with pix thereof?



I hadn't ever thought about it in these terms; I assumed "Allied Military" currency meant that the currency I've shown here was used throughout Germany after WWII.

I found these listings on a site which is both commericial (notes for sale) and informational.
http://www.atsnotes.com/catalog/banknotes/germany-french-ccupation.html
it shows notes used in French Occupied Germany in 1947.
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« Reply #178 on: 6 November 2011, 18:50:37 »
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That's exactly the kind of information I was looking for - Thanks!

Unfortunately the prices are a bit steep - the notes I have cost pennies.  However, it does prove that the Soviet, US and French zones each issued currency.  This just leaves the Brits as an unknown.

It was a wry joke in the UK that "The French got the vineyards, the Yanks got the tourist areas and we got the ruins" - however, the British Army is still there, at the request of the Germans themselves; until 1994 they were called BAOR (British Army on the Rhine) and now BFG (British Forces Germany), and will remain there until 2020.  I'm not entirely sure what there role is in the post-Cold-War era. BAOR cars, both official and owned by the families of servicemen,  used to have distinctive numberplates; this was discontinued as the IRA targetted such vehicles during the Troubles.  I'm sure that if they went as far as having special numberplates, they must have had some kind of currency before the Bank Deutsche Laender was set up.

The search continues!

Thanks again!
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Alan65
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« Reply #179 on: 27 January 2012, 07:00:50 »
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Here is the latest Austria Allied Occupation money from WWII, 1944.  This 5 schilling note has  small corner tear.
« Last Edit: 28 January 2012, 19:08:37 by Alan65 » Logged
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