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Author Topic: The Money of War  (Read 174208 times)
Alan65
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« Reply #80 on: 29 May 2010, 23:22:31 »
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Paper money from Belgium issued during World War I.  The top note, a 20-franc bill, is dated 28 June 1919 but is otherwise identical to the design used from 1910 to 1920.  20 francs was the smallest denomination; they went up to 1,000 francs.
The 2nd note is from the German occupation period and dates from May 1918.
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Alan65
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« Reply #81 on: 29 May 2010, 23:29:18 »
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50 francs/10 belgas banknote from January, 1945.

The 1943 100 francs/20 belgas banknote from Belgium.
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Alan65
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« Reply #82 on: 29 May 2010, 23:33:15 »
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The 10 korun note from Bohemia-Moravia (an area the Germans made from part of Czechoslovakia in 1939).  It's part of the same series as the 20 korun note I posted on c.page 1 and was issued in 1942.
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Alan65
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« Reply #83 on: 29 May 2010, 23:38:56 »
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the Brazil 1 cruzeiro note from 1944.  The back shows the Brazilian Naval School.



The similar 2 cruzeiros note from the same year shows the Rezende Military School on the back.
Both notes are hand-signed by a government bank official.
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Alan65
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« Reply #84 on: 30 May 2010, 17:48:58 »
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The 1 rupee note which the occupying Japanese printed for Burman.  It's one of the denominations I didn't have when I posted earlier.

I think the back looks like play-money!
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Alan65
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« Reply #85 on: 30 May 2010, 17:53:56 »
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The signatures on this 500 riels banknote from Cambodia date this to late 1968.  The beauty of this note is similar to many French colonies' paper money and give little hint to the 'killing fields' to come.
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Alan65
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« Reply #86 on: 30 May 2010, 18:01:41 »
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Another WWII piece of paper money which I didn't have when I posted earlier.  This signatures date this to 1938-41 and shows King George VI.
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Alan65
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« Reply #87 on: 30 May 2010, 18:10:11 »
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Many early 20th-century China banknotes are beautiful and this c.1914 issue is no exception.  It was issued by the Bank of Communications in China but printed by the American Banknote Co. which did much early-20th century printing for foreign governments' paper money, stamps and US stamps as well.  this says "10 yuan of the national coinage of the Republic of China."
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Alan65
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« Reply #88 on: 31 May 2010, 18:25:18 »
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Here are the 1 yuan and 5 yuan notes from China issued in 1937, the year Japan fully invaded China thus beginning the war in ernest for these two countries. The Bank of China used Sun Yat Sen on a lot of its currency at this time.






Here are the 5-, 10-, 25-, 50- and 100-yuan denomination banknotes for the same Bank of China 1940 issue.  The American Bank Note Co. printed the 1940 series while the English Thomas de la Rue Co. did the 1937 notes, above.
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« Reply #89 on: 2 June 2010, 02:05:41 »
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1941 Bank of Communications 10 yuan banknote for China.

Central Bank of China 1942 10 yuan note.

1945 500 yuan note with Sun Yat Sen at center.

the Farmer's Bank of China's 10 yuan banknote from 1940.

Central Reserve Bank of China 1 yuan note from 1940.

The 10 yuan note from the same bank and year.
the Central Reserve Bank of China was a 'puppet' bank of the Japanese government and occupying military forces.  In order to gain more acceptance, the Jpanaes put Sun Yat Sen (a national hero of the Chinese) and his masoleum--perhaps as a subtle jibe at him.
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« Reply #90 on: 2 June 2010, 04:12:35 »
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You continually amaze me with your collection!
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« Reply #91 on: 2 June 2010, 04:21:24 »
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I agree, it is a nice collection and it makes me a little annoyed that I gave away the war time script that my father came back with.

It contained everything from Syrian currency to post war German and Japanese occupation currency.
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« Reply #92 on: 2 June 2010, 22:24:10 »
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Thanks, FACman and Monty!   Maybe that's why I'm a collector--never have to regret giving somthing away.  Wait, I actually sold the 500 mils Palestine money posted earlier.  I regret that even though I got $300 for it, selling to an Egyptian currency dealer. 
You made someone else happy, Monty. . .
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« Reply #93 on: 2 June 2010, 22:38:55 »
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The 1943 500 yuan issue of the Japanese occupation forces and government.  Confucius is at right.

The 1945 100 yuan note shows Huang Ti at right and the Imperial Resting Quarters on the left.
the iconography the Japanese chose is very interesting on many of these.

The same series in the 500 yuan denomination.  the Temple of Heavan is at left.

A 5 yen note issued in 1938.  It's a direct over-print of the contemporary 5 yen note in Japan (which didn't have the reddish characters; otherwise it was identical.)  This was used by Japanese in China, especially in the military, I believe.

The 1945 100 yen military issue.  Again, similar to a then-current Japanese note except for the red over-print.  It also comes as black on green & violet and black on light blue (the note picture would be called light-brown on green.)
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MontyB
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« Reply #94 on: 3 June 2010, 01:58:12 »
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Thanks, FACman and Monty!   Maybe that's why I'm a collector--never have to regret giving somthing away.  Wait, I actually sold the 500 mils Palestine money posted earlier.  I regret that even though I got $300 for it, selling to an Egyptian currency dealer. 
You made someone else happy, Monty. . .


Actually I probably got the text wrong on that post, I didn't actually give them away they were given away accidentally during a period in which the family placed little value on these items (I have even given the location of an old well where 2 family members WW1 medals were dumped after the war, I am told that if I can recover the medals the military will replace the ribbons).

However having seen the collection you have I have decided to ask the person who has them about the possibility of buying them back and getting scanned copies of what he wants to keep.
 
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« Reply #95 on: 3 June 2010, 04:48:00 »
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It's a fun hobby, full of history and art; in your case it sounds like some close-to-home meaning, too. 
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« Reply #96 on: 3 June 2010, 05:46:32 »
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To be honest I am not sure where I would start a collection or how to go about starting it in the first place, with New Zealand being so far off the beaten track in terms of location and having a such a small population it would mean I am relegated to having to buy off the internet and I am not entirely trusting of that.

I think there is a certain level of meaning in it but I think it is less sentimental and more historical, I don't want to see these things lost to time because we as New Zealanders have very little sense of historical meaning.
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« Reply #97 on: 4 June 2010, 16:50:59 »
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If there's a coin shop in your area, check there.  I find them at postcard shows, too. Any antique mall or estate sale is a potential treasure trove. I use Delcampe.com to buy and sell.  it's a Belgian auction site with servers for the US, UK, and many other countries (you don't have to speak French or German)  It's geared for collectors (mostly stamps, coins, postcards, etc. not the crap I see on e-bay) and is very friendly and the staff are helpful esp. compared to e-bay.
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« Reply #98 on: 4 June 2010, 21:40:44 »
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The Japanese Imperial government's 5 sen note, issued 1940, for Japanese military occupation of China.

The 10 sen note in the same series.

The 1938 50 sen note of the same military government of Japan

and the 1940 version. The difference is the title at top--7- versus 11-characters.

the 1 yen issue of the 1940 series.

5 yen 1940 note.

1938 10 yen issue.
I don't have the 1-sen nor 100-yen notes (yet!)  All denominations come in the 7-character or 11-character title versions for the early and later issues.  If you see similar designs with different colors, they may be the Imperial Japanese government issues for other occupied areas like French Indo-China.
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Alan65
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« Reply #99 on: 4 June 2010, 21:52:13 »
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The 1940 Fiji 5 shillings banknote showing George VI in semi-profile.  The 10 shilling and 1 pound notes were similar; the later 1-pound and all 5-, 10- and 20-pound notes have the same basic design but show the King facing full-front. (someday, I hope to show them here, too, but they run into the $1,000s)
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