War & Conflicts Discussions => Wars & Conflicts: Modelling, Miniatures, Postal Stamps, Music, Patches, Money => Topic started by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 16:28:14



Title: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 16:28:14
Perhaps this will grow into a separate area of this section, I don't know, but I thought I'd begin posting another aspect of my 'paper collection of wars', the currency and banknotes used during wartime.  These will be military payment script, government issued currency, occupation currency and bank-issued notes in circulation as money; what people carried around with them, bought and sold during war time.  The first listings will be for notes used and issued during WWII.

At some point I will try to find a way to give an idea of what such notes could buy--what is a Franc in WWII, or a dollar or peso worth at the time?



Title: Algeria Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 16:30:42
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Algeria77b5francs1941front.jpg)
Algerian 5 Franc banknote from the 1941 issue.  At this time Algeria was Vichy, occupied by French troops.  This note is identical to those of the 1920s and '30s except for the date--no change in government as far as the French and Algerians were concerned (officially) thus no change in currency design.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Algeria78b20francs1929front.jpg)
Except for the date in the center--this one is from the 1929 series--the Algerian 20 Franc note design did not change between September 1914 and March 1942.  This example could have still been circulating during WWII.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Algeria915Francs1942.jpg)
The Bank of Algeria, Banque de L'Algerie, opened and operated under Allied occupation during 1942-43.  This 5 franc note is from the first series, dated 16 November, 1942, and was issued for Algerians and general circulation.


Title: Austria WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 16:48:19
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Austria1031Schilling1944.jpg)
this note was issued by the Alliierte Militarbehorde, the Allied Military Authority, for Austria in 1944.  It is a 1 Schilling note printed in England or Austria depending on the watermark.


Title: Belgian WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 16:55:39
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Belgium11120francs18-02-43front.jpg)
The Belgian 20 franc note of the early 1940s.  This design came out in January of 1940 but was not changed under German occupation thus King Albert and Queen Elisabeth are still seen on this 1943 issue.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Belgium12210francs2Belgas19431944.jpg)
Flemish language side of the 10 franc/2 belgas Banque Nationale de Belgique note issued by the Kingdom in Exile in 1943-44.

 (http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Belgium1215BF1Belga1943.jpg)
and the French language side of the 5 franc/1 Belga note of the same series.


Title: Bohemia & Moravia WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 17:07:44
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/BohemiaMoravia920Korun1944.jpg)
This 20 korun note is from Bohenia and Moravia and was issued on 24 January, 1944.  Bohemia & Moravia was officially a Protectorate from March 1939 until 1945; it was/is, of course, a part of Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic) before and after these dates when Czech currency was/is used.  The boy is no one in particular, just a typical or archetypical Bohemian boy.


Title: Burma WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 17:15:13
From 1942-44 the Japanese government issued occupation currency for Burma.  There were 1-, 5-, 10-cent denominations; 1/4-, 1/2-, 1-, 10- and 100-rupee notes as well.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Burma11a10cents1942.jpg)
10-cent Burma note, 1942 under Japanese occupation.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Burma12a1fourthrupee1942.jpg)
A quarter (1/4) rupee note, under Japanese occupation, 1942.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Burma16b10rupees1942.jpg)
10-rupee note, 1942-44 (inflation did away with 1-cent, 5-cent etc. later in the war), under Japanese occupation.


Title: Canada WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 25 March 2009, 17:20:07
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Canada58d1dollar1937.jpg)
This design for the Canadian 1 dollar banknote was first issued in 1937, used throughout WWII, and finally replace by a design with Queen Elizabeth II in 1954.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Canada59b2dollars1937.jpg)
Here is the 2 dollar design in the same series.


Title: China WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 26 March 2009, 18:25:28
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China237d10yuan1941front.jpg)
The 10 yuan note from the Republic of China government, 1941.  The '30s and '40s were a time when new bank issues came out nearly every year; the country was controlled by different governments and warlords in different areas and currency was issued quite often.  This, of course, made its value lower than otherwise would be in a stable state.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China240b20yuan1941front.jpg)
The 20 yuan note from the same 1941 banknote series.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China245a10Yuan1942back.jpg)
Here is the back of the 1942 10 yuan China banknote.  Military themes found their way into everyday life at this time in history.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China1565yuan1941-1.jpg)
This is the 5 yuan 1941 issue from the Bank of Communications, one of several banks issuing its own currency in China at this time.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China2355yuan1941front.jpg)
5 yuan note, 1941, from the National Bank of China.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China243100yuan1941-1.jpg)
Central Bank of China 100 yuan note from 1941.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China251500Yuan1942-1.jpg)
and the Central Bank's 1942 500 yuan note.





Title: Curacao WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 26 March 2009, 18:30:24
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Curacao35a1Gulden1942front.jpg)
Curacao 1 gulden banknote from 1942.  The image is of Mercury sitting between two ships. this design was used throughout the 1940s; this one is dated 1942 on the back.


Title: Czech WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 27 March 2009, 23:14:31
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Czechoslovakia465Korun1944.jpg)
1944 5 Crown note issued by the Czechoslovak Republic but printed in Moscow.


Title: Egypt WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 27 March 2009, 23:18:32
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Egypt167b10piastres1940-1.jpg)
Egyptian 10 piastres note. This design was first used in 1940 and continued until 1952.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Egypt1635piastresND1940.jpg)
the front of the 5 piastres note of the same series.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Egypt1645piastresND1940.jpg)
and this is the second type of 5 piastre note from the 1940 Law series.


Title: Fiji WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 27 March 2009, 23:27:50
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Fiji50a2shillings1942front.jpg)
This is the 2 shilling banknote from 1942.  For some reason, this is one of my favorites; its design is like the early currency of the American colonies and is 'uniface', meaning the back is blank.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Rattler on 27 March 2009, 23:33:20
- image (see original post), not quoted -

The 10 yuan note from the Republic of China government, 1941.  The '30s and '40s were a time when new bank issues came out nearly every year; the country was controlled by different governments and warlords in different areas and currency was issued quite often.  This, of course, made its value lower than otherwise would be in a stable state.

- image (see original post), not quoted -

The 20 yuan note from the same 1941 banknote series.

- image (see original post), not quoted -

Here is the back of the 1942 10 yuan China banknote.  Military themes found their way into everyday life at this time in history.

- image (see original post), not quoted -

This is the 5 yuan 1941 issue from the Bank of Communications, one of several banks issuing its own currency in China at this time.

- image (see original post), not quoted -

5 yuan note, 1941, from the National Bank of China.

- image (see original post), not quoted -

Central Bank of China 100 yuan note from 1941.

- image (see original post), not quoted -

and the Central Bank's 1942 500 yuan note.


Here a nice take on money and bills and how banks worked from one of my favorite books about those times (Neal Stephenson´s Cryptonomicon) to put things into perspective with respect to China at those times and what the USMC lived:

Quote
...
Two tires fly. Two wail.
A bamboo grove, all chopped down
From it, warring songs

....is the best that Corporal Bobby Shaftoe can do on short notice - he's standing on the running board, gripping his Springfield with one hand and the rearview mirror with the other, so counting the syllables on his fingers is out of the question. Is "tires'' one syllable or two? How about "wail?'' The truck finally makes up its mind not to tip over, and thuds back onto four wheels. The wail - and the moment - are lost. Bobby can still hear the coolies singing, though, and now too there's the gunlike snicking of the truck's clutch linkage as Private Wiley downshifts. Could Wiley be losing his nerve? And, in the back, under the tarps, a ton and a half of file cabinets clanking, code books slaloming, fuel spanking the tanks of Station Alpha's electrical generator. The modern world's hell on haiku writers: "Electrical generator'' is, what, eight syllables? You couldn't even fit that onto the second line!

"Are we allowed to run over people?'' Private Wiley inquires, and then mashes the horn button before Bobby Shaftoe can answer. A Sikh policeman hurdles a night soil cart. Shaftoe's gut reaction is: Sure, what're they going to do, declare war on us? but as the highest-ranking man on this truck he's probably supposed to be using his head or something, so he doesn't blurt it out just yet. He takes stock of the situation:

Shanghai, 1645 hours, Friday, the 28th of November 1941. Bobby Shaftoe, and the other half-dozen Marines on his truck, are staring down the length of Kiukiang Road, onto which they've just made this careening high-speed turn. Cathedral's going by to the right, so that means they are, what? two blocks away from the Bund. A Yangtze River Patrol gunboat is tied up there, waiting for the stuff they've got in the back of this truck. The only real problem is that those particular two blocks are inhabited by about five million Chinese people.

Now these Chinese are sophisticated urbanites, not suntanned yokels who've never seen cars before - they'll get out of your way if you drive fast and honk your horn. And indeed many of them flee to one side of the street or the other, producing the illusion that the truck its moving faster than the forty-three miles an hour shown on its speedometer.

But the bamboo grove in Bobby Shaftoe's haiku has not been added just to put a little Oriental flavor into the poem and wow the folks back home in Oconomowoc. There is a lot of heavy bamboo in front of this truck, dozens of makeshift turnpikes blocking their path to the river, for the officers of the U.S. Navy's Asiatic Fleet, and of the Fourth Marines, who dreamed up this little operation forgot to take the Friday Afternoon factor into account. As Bobby Shaftoe could've explained to them, if only they'd bothered to ask a poor dumb jarhead, their route took them through the heart of the banking district. Here you've got the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank of course, City Bank, Chase Manhattan, the Bank of America, and BBME and the Agricultural Bank of China and any number of crappy little provincial banks, and several of those banks have contracts with what's left of the Chinese Government to print currency. It must be a cutthroat business because they slash costs by printing it on old newspapers, and if you know how to read Chinese, you can see last year's news stories and polo scores peeking through the colored numbers and pictures that transform these pieces of paper into legal tender.

As every chicken-peddler and rickshaw operator in Shanghai knows, the money-printing contracts stipulate that all of the bills these banks print have to be backed by such-and-such an amount of silver; i.e., anyone should be able to walk into one of those banks at the end of Kiukiang Road and slap down a pile of bills and (provided that those bills were printed by that same bank) receive actual metallic silver in exchange.

Now if China weren't right in the middle of getting systematically drawn and quartered by the Empire of Nippon, it would probably send official bean counters around to keep tabs on how much silver was actually present in these banks' vaults, and it would all be quiet and orderly. But as it stands, the only thing keeping these banks honest is the other banks.

Here's how they do it: During the normal course of business, lots of paper money will pass over the counters of (say) Chase Manhattan Bank. They'll take it into a back room and sort it, throwing into money boxes (a couple of feet square and a yard deep, with ropes on the four corners) all of the bills that were printed by (say) Bank of America in one, all of the City Bank bills into another. Then, on Friday afternoon they will bring in coolies. Each coolie, or pair of coolies, will of course have his great big long bamboo pole with him - a coolie without his pole is like a China Marine without his nickel-plated bayonet - and will poke their pole through the ropes on the corners of the box. Then one coolie will get underneath each end of the pole, hoisting the box into the air. They have to move in unison or else the box begins flailing around and everything gets out of whack. So as they head towards their destination - whatever bank whose name is printed on the bills in their box - they sing to each other, and plant their feet on the pavement in time to the music. The pole's pretty long, so they are that far apart, and they have to sing loud to hear each other, and of course each pair of coolies in the street is singing their own particular song, trying to drown out all of the others so that they don't get out of step.

So ten minutes before closing time on Friday afternoon, the doors of many banks burst open and numerous pairs of coolies march in singing, like the curtain-raiser on a fucking Broadway musical, slam their huge boxes of tattered currency down, and demand silver in exchange. All of the banks do this to each other. Sometimes, they'll all do it on the same Friday, particularly at times like 28 November 1941, when even a grunt like Bobby Shaftoe can understand that it's better to be holding silver than piles of old cut-up newspaper. And that is why, once the normal pedestrians and food-cart operators and furious Sikh cops have scurried out of the way, and plastered themselves up against the clubs and shops and bordellos on Kiukiang Road, Bobby Shaftoe and the other Marines on the truck still cannot even see the gunboat that is their destination, because of this horizontal forest of mighty bamboo poles. They cannot even hear the honking of their own truck horn because of the wild throbbing pentatonic cacophony of coolies singing. This ain't just your regular Friday P.M. Shanghai bank-district money-rush. This is an ultimate settling of accounts before the whole Eastern Hemisphere catches fire. The millions of promises printed on those slips of bumwad will all be kept or broken in the next ten minutes; actual pieces of silver and gold will move, or they won't. It is some kind of fiduciary Judgment Day.

"Jesus Christ, I can't - '' Private Wiley hollers.

"The captain said don't stop for any reason whatsofuckinever,'' Shaftoe reminds him. He's not telling Wiley to run over the coolies, he's reminding Wiley that if he refrains from running over them, they will have some explaining to do - which will be complicated by the fact that the captain is right behind them in a car stuffed with Tommy Gun-toting China Marines. And from the way the captain's been acting about this Station Alpha thing, it's pretty clear that he already has a few preliminary strap marks on his ass, courtesy of some admiral in Pearl Harbor or even (drumroll) Marine Barracks, Eight and Eye Streets Southeast, Washington, D.C.


Rattler


Title: France WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 28 March 2009, 00:04:22
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France835francs13-7-39front.jpg)
This was the 5 franc note in circulation when the French declared war in 1939.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France8410francs28-9-39front.jpg)
and the 10 franc banknote from the same series.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France94100francs1939.jpg)
100 francs banknote from 1939.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France9350francs18-12-41-1.jpg)
A 50 francs note from 1941, Jacques Coeur on the front.

(http://://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France98a5francs1943-1.jpg)
1943 issue of French 5 francs banknote, Pyrenean shephard pictured on the front.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France99e10francs26-11-42front.jpg)
1942 10-franc banknote with a miner on the front (the back has farm woman with a baby in her arms)

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France100a20francs12-2-42-1.jpg)
20 franc note from 1942 showing a Breton fisherman on the front.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France114a2francs1944front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France115a5francs1944.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France116a10francs1944front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/France117a50francs1944front-1.jpg)
these notes are all in the first series of the Allied Military currency issued for use in France in 1944; they were printed in Boston.  The 2-, 5- and 10-franc notes are small and square; the 50- (and 100-, 500-, 1000- and 5000-francs which I don't have!) are larger, more the shape and size of US currency.



Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 28 March 2009, 00:09:36

Here a nice take on money and bills and how banks worked from one of my favorite books about those times (Neal Stephenson´s Cryptonomicon) to put things into perspective with respect to China at those times and what the USMC lived:

Rattler


One of my favorite books! Have you read his Baroque Cycle?
Wait until you see my posts for the 1930s Chinese banknotes; they go in a different topic as they are more numerous.


Title: French Indo-China WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 28 March 2009, 00:11:55
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/FrenchIndo-China76a1piastre1945-1.jpg)
the 1945 French Indo-china issue of 1 piastre, printed by the American Banknote Company (the ABNC printed US stamps and foreign currency around the world.)


Title: French West Africa WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 28 March 2009, 00:17:51
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/FrenchWestAfrica28a5francs1942front.jpg)
OK, first--French West Africa (Africque Occidentale Francaise) consisted of the current countries of Mauritania, Senegal, Dahomey, French Sudan, Ivory Coast Upper Volta, Niger, French Guinea and Togo.
This is the 5 franc note from 1942.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/FrenchWestAfrica34b1franc1944-1.jpg)
1944 1 franc note.


Title: Germany WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 28 March 2009, 00:29:42
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany1865marks1942.jpg)
This 5 Reichsmark note was issued starting 1 August 1942.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany191a1halfmark1944.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany192b1Mark1944.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany195d20marks1944.jpg)
These three examples show the Allied Occupation currency printed in 1944 for use in Germany which are obviously very similar to the French notes and as you'll see the Italian issues.  Besides the 1/2-, 1- and 20-mark denominations, there were 5-, 10-, 50-, 100- and 1000-mark issues.


Title: Hong Kong WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 28 March 2009, 00:41:20
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/HongKong313b1centND1941front-1.jpg)
this 1-cent note (yes, Hong Kong had paper currency for denominations as small as 1 cent) was in circulation starting in 1941.  the notes are very small--less than 3 inches/about 7.5 cm across and were not good for sums over 1 dollar, ie. if you had 200 of them, you couldn't pay a 2 dollar amount.

My wife was born and raised in Hong Kong and my father-in-law was in Hong Kong when the Japanese invaded (he was 11 yrs old) so I love Hong Kong currency more than most.


Title: Iceland WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 28 March 2009, 00:45:45
yes, I even have Iceland WWII currency. . . :D

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Iceland22f1Krona1945front.jpg)
This design is for what is called the Emergency WWII issue; the serial numbers tell us what year the note is from--this one corresponds to 1945--but the design was issued from 1941-47.  the paper is very fragile, it seems thinner than most and almost 'waxy'.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Rattler on 28 March 2009, 01:04:37

Here a nice take on money and bills and how banks worked from one of my favorite books about those times (Neal Stephenson´s Cryptonomicon) to put things into perspective with respect to China at those times and what the USMC lived:

Rattler


One of my favorite books! Have you read his Baroque Cycle?
Wait until you see my posts for the 1930s Chinese banknotes; they go in a different topic as they are more numerous.


Just "Quicksilver", those are hard to get here in Spain with their strange editing methods (they made *3* volumes just out of Cryptonomicon, each with a different name and of cause w/o any sense if you just read one, a shame...) and I prefer to read him in English (the German translation is excellent, though).

I like his style and humor, and Cryptonomicon for me (given that Quicksilver introduces a few of the basics) is his top work that I have read, it equals "Perfume" (Patrick Süskind), "The Discovery of Slowliness" (Sten Nadolny) or "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" (Robert Pirsig) in its focus on one sense or mental branch and it´s quality as literature.

Rattler


Title: Italy WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 01:22:28
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Italy285Lire1940front.jpg)
Italian 1940 5 lira note showing King Vittorio Emanuele III.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Italy75a100Lire1944front.jpg)
the 100 lira banknote issued by the interim government in 1944.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Italy7450Lire1944front.jpg)
the 50 lira note from the same series.  Issued by the Banca d'Italia, December 1944.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Italy31c5lire1944front-1.jpg)
5 lira banknote issued November 1944, after the fall of Rome.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Italy32c10lire1944front-1.jpg)
and the 10 lira note from the same series of 'bigleietto di stato.'

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ItalyM101lire1943front-1.jpg)
military occupation currency of Italy looks like the French, German and Japanese of WWII.  This is the 1 lira note, issued in 1943.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ItalyM112lire1943front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ItalyM125lire1943front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ItalyM1310lire1943front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ItalyM1450Lire1943front-1.jpg)
and here are the 2-, 5-, 10- and 50-lira notes; there were also 100-, 500- and 1,000-lira denominations.



Title: japan WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 01:52:10
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan43a5Yen1942front.jpg)
This 5 yen note was issued in 1942, with Kitano Shrine at left and Sugawara Michizane at right.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan51a10yen1943front-1.jpg)
10 yen 1943 Japanes banknote; Wakeno Kiyomaro pictured at right.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan54a1yen1944front.jpg)
This 1 yen note was issued c.1944-45 and has Takeuchi Sukune's portrait in the center.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan6550senB1945front.jpg)
50 sen military occupation note of 1945
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan67b1yen1955Bserialnumberfront.jpg)
The 1 yen note for the Allied military occupation series--note the similarity to the other occupation notes in design. These were in use in Japan from 1945 through at least 1957 by military personnel.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan69a5yen1945Aserialnumberfront.jpg)
5 yen note from the same series, issued 1945.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan7320yenB1945front.jpg)
and the 20 yen denomination of the occupation currency.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan75100yenB1945front.jpg)
and the 100 yen example; it also came in 1,000 yen denomination.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan85a1yen1946front1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan87a10yen1946front.jpg)
the above two examples are from 1946 just to show that occupation currency wasn't the only money in circulation in Japan after the war; these 1- and 10-yen notes would have been used by ordinary Japanese citizens.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan491yen1943front-1.jpg)
This is the 1943 1 yen Japanese currency; note the serial number has a different lay-out than the one above with the hand-writing across the front.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan525sen1944front.jpg)
1944 5 sen (100sen=1yen) note of Japan.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan5350sen1944front-1.jpg)
and the 10-sen note of 1944.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan5950senunkShowayear2front.jpg)
50 sen banknote issued by "Great Imperial Japanese Government" in 1942, '43 and '44. (the Showa year--17, 18 or 19--appears in the column of Japanese text on the far right, below the bird's tale; in this case, the 'cross' + 'the two lines leaning on each other' are "18" or 1943.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan5950senunkShowayear1front.jpg)
1942 50 sen note.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan5950Senunkyear.jpg)
and the 1944 example.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan5110yen1943-44front-1.jpg)
the 10 yen banknote of 1943 and '44.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan57100yen1944front.jpg)
and finally (for now) the 100 yen 1944 Japan banknote, showing Yumedono pavilion at left and a portrait of Shotoku-taishi.


Title: Latvia WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 02:28:39
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Latvia2125Latu1938front.jpg)
This example of the Latvian 25 latu note was issued in 1938 but would have been in circulation when WWII started and even when the Soviets invaded in 1941.


Title: Lebanon WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 02:36:45
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Lebanon3625piastres1942front.jpg)
This is a faded copy of the 1942 Lebanon 25 piastres banknote.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Lebanon19445piastresback.jpg)
and here is the back side of the 1944 Lebanese 5 piastres note. (the front isn't as interesting.)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Lebanon194410Piastresfront.jpg)
this is the front of the 10 piastres note of the same 1944 issue.


Title: Luxembourg WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 02:38:29
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Luxembourg43a5francs1944front.jpg)
the lone example in my collection of Luxembourg WWII currency is the 1944 issue of the 5 franc note showing Grand Duchess Charlotte on the front.


Title: Malaya WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 02:52:14
The following are all Japanese government occupation notes of 1942-45 issue.  The 1-, 5-, 10- and 50-cent and 1- and 5-dollar notes are from 1942; the 10 dollare note was issued in 1942-44; there were two types of 100-dollar designs, one from '44 and one from '45.  The 1,000 dollar denomination came out in 1945.  Inflation was generally the cause of the higher values coming out later in the war. 
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/MalayaM1a1cent1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/MalayaM1b1cent1942front.jpg)
These two 1-cent notes differ only in the serial number letter pre-fix; one is 'fractional' the other 'block' format.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/MalayaM2b5cents1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/MalayaM3b10cents1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/MalayaM4b50cents1942front.jpg)
The 5-, 10- and 50-cent designs from 1942.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/MalayaM5c1dollar1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/MalayaM7c10dollars1944front.jpg)
and the 1- (1942) and 10-dollar (1944) banknotes from the Japanese occupation issue.  The design gets fancier with the higher values.


Title: Morocco WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 03:15:50
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Morocco245francs1943front.jpg)
This Moroccan 5 franc banknote was issued in 1943.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Morocco2510francs1943front.jpg)
Here is the 10 francs note also from 1943.  Note that a Philadelphia printer had the contract to print these banknotes.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Morocco4150centimes1944.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Morocco421franc1944front.jpg)
The above two images show a 50 centimes and 1 franc currency note from the 1944 'emergency' issue for the Empire Cherifien, a Protectorate of France. The 'Cherifien Empire' bit merely refers to Morocco being a sherif (ruled by a descendant of Mohammed) dynasty.  These two are merely thick pieces of cardboard, about an inch square.


Title: Netherlands WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 03:28:08
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Netherlands611gulden1938front.jpg)
this 1938 1 gulden 'silver note' was what was in circulation when the Germans invaded in 1940.
 
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Netherlands641gulden1943front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Netherlands6610gulden1943front.jpg)
These 1- and 10-gulden notes are from the non-German ocupation 1943 issue.


Title: Netherland Indies (now Indonesia) WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 03:38:36
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies110a50Cents1943fron.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies111a1gulden1943fron.jpg)
These two are the Netherland Indies 1943 issue of the 50 cent and 1 gulden currency notes.  They are obviously very like the Netherland notes of the same year except for the name.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies119b1cent1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies120c5cents1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies123c1gulden1942fron.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies124c5gulden1942fron.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies125c10gulden1942fro.jpg)
and these occupation notes issued by the Japanese government for use in the Netherland Indies are obviously very similar to the notes I've already listed for Malaya.  They come with the 'fractional' and 'block' serial letters but have Dutch instead of English on them. They are all from 1942.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Koen on 2 April 2009, 18:52:28
thx for sharing  smallclap


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 19:00:26
of course! why keep it locked up out of view? hopefully there's some interest in seeing this on this site.  I believe it gives us a 'feel' for the times in another way that some relics don't.
I have been asked via PM about other eras and countries; when I'm done with WWII years, I'll have more to post from other countries/eras.


Title: New Hebrides WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 23:50:36
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NewHebrides4b5francs1941front-1.jpg)
This 1941 New Hebrides 5 francs banknote has obviously seen better days.  This is the New Caledonia 5 francs note issued starting in the late 1920s with a red overprint in the center "Nouvelles Hebrides France Libre".  While Great Britain and France both administered the islands, the Bank of Indo-china (a French concern) issued the paper currency.


Title: New Zealand WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 2 April 2009, 23:55:02
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NewZealand159a1Pound1940-55front.jpg)
here is the 1 Pound New Zealand banknote of WWII.  This issue was first established in 1940 with the signature 'T.P. Hanna'; with other signatures this design was issued through 1967.


Title: Oceania (Gilbert/Solomon Islands; New Britain; Papua New Guinea) WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 3 April 2009, 00:01:29
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Oceania1a1-2shilling1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Oceania2a1shilling1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Oceania4a1pound1942front.jpg)
Oceania was the name for many Pacific Islands; the formerly British-controlled ones had these issued by the Japanese goverment when they took over.  Many design elements are the same as other occupation currency from the Japanese.  The British denominations tell us which islands they were for. 
These were all issued starting in 1942.  There was a 10 shilling note, too, which I don't have.


Title: Palestine WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 3 April 2009, 00:07:38
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Palestine6c500mils1939front-1.jpg)
The Palesinte Currency Board issued this 500 mils (1000 mils=1 pound) in April of 1939.


Title: Philippines WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 3 April 2009, 00:54:15
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines102a1centavo1942block-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines102b1centavo1942fract-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines103a5centavos1942bloc-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines104b10centavos1942fra-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines105a50centavos1942buf-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines1061peso1942front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines107a5pesos1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines1105pesos1943front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines10810pesos1943front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines11110pesos1943front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines112a100pesos1944front-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines114a500pesos1944front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines115c1000pesos1945offs-2.jpg)
First, here are the Japanese occupation notes issued starting in 1942.  There were two different designs for the 5 and 10 peso notes shown; the ones with the buildings to the side were from 1943, not '42.  The 100, 500 and 1000 peso banknotes are from 1944-45, again inflation was rampant when the issuing government had no incentive to keep the amount of money low; when it needed to pay someone, it printed the banknotes.  You will notice the similar design with other occupation notes.  The letters tell us which country the note was for:  B for Burma; M for Malaya; O for Oceania; P for the Philippines, etc. (I'm not sure why the Dutch East Indies got an 'S'--Surabaya, perhaps?)

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines941peso1944VICTORY.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines95a2pesos1944.jpg)
After the war, Philippine notes with the pre-war design had "VICTORY" over-printed on the back.  here are the 1 and 2 peso notes.




Title: Russia WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 3 April 2009, 00:56:11
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Russia2131ruble1938front.jpg)
here is the 1 ruble banknote in use during WWII.  First issued in 1938, this design was not replaced until 1947 (they had other things on their minds than paper currency.)


Title: Switzerland WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 4 April 2009, 04:01:29
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Switzerland11k5Franken1944front.jpg)
This is the Swiss 5 Franken banknote issued 1944; this design was actually in use from 1913 to 1953, the date and signatures being the only things that would change from time to time as new officials took office.


Title: Trindidad & Tobago WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 4 April 2009, 04:04:41
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/TrinidadandTobago5c1dollarfront.jpg)
One of my favorites--I'm not sure why--is the Trinidad & Tobago currency. This is the 1 dollar bill of 1942; different signatures/dates in '39 and '43 but the same over-all design.
because I like it so much, here's the back:
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/TrinidadandTobago5c1dollar1942.jpg)


Title: Tunisia WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 4 April 2009, 04:23:41
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Tunisia8b5francs1940front.jpg)
here is the Tunisian 5 francs note of 1940. You may recognize this from the Algeria post above.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/tunisia6b20Francs1941front.jpg)
Here is the 1941 issue of the Tunisian 20 Francs banknote.  The French merely used Algerian money over-printed "Tunisia" on the side for money circulated in Tunisia.
This same design (different dates/signatures) was used in WWI, too; examples are dated "3.8.1914".


Title: United States WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 4 April 2009, 04:40:35
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/UnitedStates416D2estar1dollar1935Ef.jpg)
The 1935 series was what circulated until 1957 so I consider it the 'WWII' issue for the USA.  The star in the serial number of this note designates a replacement note.  The back looks like a current 1 dollar bill.  The seal is blue.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/UnitedStatesHawaii361dollar1935Afro.jpg)
In 1941, this 1 dollar bill was introduced for use in Hawaii.  The thinking was that if the Japanese invaded or if a large quantity of notes were captured, they could quickly be declared worthless. (a similar concept was used in Kansas and Nebraska in 1913 with postage stamps!)  Note the red seal and 'Hawaii' printed on the sides.  Here is the back, which shows the bigger change:
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/UnitedStatesHawaii361dollar1935A.jpg)
these 'Hawaii' notes came in $5, $10 and $20 denominations, too.  They were removed from circulation in October of '44 but saw some use in formerly Japanese-controlled islands thereafter.


Title: Uruguay WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 4 April 2009, 04:44:30
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Uruguay3450centavos1939front.jpg)
This is the Uruguay 50 centavos note of 1939, in circulation when WWII started. J.G. Artigas is pictured on the front.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Mad Russian on 4 April 2009, 05:38:05
The American money with the blue seal were know as silver certificates. I think that's because they were backed by silver at the time.

Good Hunting.

MR


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 4 April 2009, 07:25:27
yes, theoretically, one could take them to a bank and get silver for them; not a big deal since US coins were silver at the time (until 1964 the 10- 25- 50-cent coins were 90% silver; silver dollars were stopped in the 1920s. Through 1968, US coins of these denominations were 40% silver.)  Federal Reserve Notes, which we have now, are issued by the Federal Reserve Bank(s); there are 12 and you can see the names on the new bills. 'A' is for the Boston branch all the way to 'L' for San Francisco.
The US also had Gold Notes before the Silver Certificates which were redeemable for gold (when our coins were made of gold in $5, $10 and $20.)  Gold was illegal to own in the US for many years starting in 1933.  Thank you, FDR . . .


Title: Belgium WWII Banknotes, part 2
Post by: Alan65 on 5 April 2009, 00:28:54
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Belgium107100francs20belgas1938fron.jpg)
here is the 100 francs/20 belgas note in circulation at the start of the war. while this was the design from 1933 to 1943, this note is dated 1938.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Belgium109500francs100belgas1939fro.jpg)
and the 500francs/100belgas denomination of the same series c.1939.


Title: Philippines WWII Banknotes, part 2
Post by: Alan65 on 5 April 2009, 00:39:05
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines965pesos1944front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Philippines965pesos1944.jpg)
The front and back of the 1944 'Victory' issue of the Philippine 5 peso note.  The back of the 1 and 2 peso notes are shown in and earlier post.
It's kind of interesting that McKinley (US President during the Spanish-American War when the US took possession of the Philippines) and Admiral Dewey (US naval hero of that war) are still on the front of this bill during such a major struggle as WWII.  This design was first used in 1929 when the personalities were a bit more recent to the issue and WWII was not yet completed.

A careful reading of this note shows that it, too, was redeemable for silver pesos or the equivalent in US legal tender.


Title: Great Britain WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 8 April 2009, 03:14:18
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/GreatBritainM31shilling1943front.jpg)
A military payment certificate for 1 Shilling first designed for use by British troops in North Africa in 1943; later used in Cyprus in '56.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 05:25:10
I've recently added 3 more Burma banknotes fromt he WWII Japanese occupation to my collection.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Burma131-2halfrupee1942front.jpg)
1/2 rupee from 1942.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Burma15b5rupees1942-44front.jpg)
The Burma 5 rupee note from c.1942-44
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Burma17b100rupees1944.jpg)
the 100 rupee note for Burma, first issued 1944. 
Notice how the Japanese insistence to keep printing more and more paper money caused inflation, the denominations kept going up and up.


Title: Chinese banknote, 1940
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 05:39:23
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China845yuan1940-1.jpg)
1940 5 yuan banknote from China.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China214a10yuan1940front-1.jpg)
the Central Bank of China issued this note in 1940; it shows Sun Yat Sen's portrait and is valued at 10 Yuan.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China242a50yuan1941CentralBankof-1.jpg)
the Central Bank of China's 50 Yuan note from 1941.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China47650yuan1941-1.jpg)
50 yuan note issued by the Farmer's Bank of China, 1941.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China477a100yuan1941FarmersBanko-1.jpg)
the Farmer's Bank of China issued this 100 yuan note in 1941.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ChinaJ721yuan1941.jpg)
1 yuan note issued for Japanese occupation forces in China. It dates from 1941.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 05:46:59
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ChinaM24JapaneseOccupation5yen19-1.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/ChinaM27JapaneseOccupation10Yen1-1.jpg)
These are Japanese military banknotes of 5 and 10 yen denomination, issued for use in areas of China which the Japanese were occupying.  They probably date from 1938 although the 5 yen (top) note may be from 1944.  I think they're beautiful, notwithstanding the horrors of occupied life for the Chinese.


Title: More Fiji Money
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 05:53:43
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Fiji471penny1942.jpg)
here, ladies and gentlemen, is the 1 Penny note from Fiji, issued c.1942.  :champ:


Title: Finland Currency WWII
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 05:56:36
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Finland7120markaa1939front.jpg)
here is the 20 markaa note from Finland, c.1939, when the Winter War was raging.


Title: French West Africa currency WWII
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 06:02:28
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/FrenchWestAfrica3025francs1942front.jpg)
here is a French West Africa 25 francs note issued in 1942. FWA was made up of Mauritania, Senegal, Dahomey, French Sudan, Ivory Coast, Upper Volta, Niger, French Guinea and Togo.


Title: More Netherland Indies WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 06:12:32
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NetherlandIndies113a5gulden1943.jpg)
I just acquired this 5 gulden note for the Netherland Indies c1943. (the 50 cent and 1 Gulden note are posted earlier in this thread.)


Title: More Netherlands WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 06:16:27
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Netherlands701gulden1945front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Netherlands712andhalfGuldens1945fro.jpg)
Here are the 1945 1- and 2 1/2 gulden banknotes for the Netherland, c1945.


Title: New Caledonia Currency of WWII
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 06:21:50
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NewCaledonia521franc1942.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NewCaledonia56a2francs1943.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NewCaledonia57a20francs1943.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/NewCaledonia5450centimes1943.jpg)
I was pleased to find all of these at a coin show earlier this year.  These are the New Caledonia banknotes in 1 franc (1942), 50 centimes, 2- and 20 franc denominations (all 1943).


Title: Poland Currency of WWII
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 06:33:32
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Poland991Zloty1941front.jpg)
This banknote was issued by the Emission bank of Poland (Bank Emisyjny w Polsce) and were issued to be used in the Gouvernement General, which basically consisted of the districts of Warsaw, Lublin, Galicia and Radom.


Title: More Russian WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 06:37:30
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Russia2155rubles1938front.jpg)
Although this 5 ruble note was issued c.1938, it would have been in circulation throughout WWII as no new notes were designed until 1947.


Title: Suriname WWII Currency
Post by: Alan65 on 16 September 2009, 06:41:05
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Suriname105c1gulden1942front.jpg)
Suriname's 1 gulden note c.1942


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Solideo on 16 September 2009, 08:51:59
Just allow me to post one "special payment" ticket in Spanish Civil War times.

(http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/5087/2236514014a032225c9bowh.jpg) (http://img193.imageshack.us/i/2236514014a032225c9bowh.jpg/)

This ticket is from the republican band September 1936, just a month since war began. Republicans were the "red" legitime government.

In this payment ticket you can read "Vale por seis "porvos" con la Lola". (It shoul really say "polvos", but the authority should have no many studies.

The traslation will be more or less. The ticket was giving the soldier the opportunity of "having 6 sex relations with Lola (a Spanish female name, of which is suppossed to be a prostitute).

At the end of the ticket you can read " No se puede transferir" (No transfer allowed), so it only could be used by the authorized person who won the payment of that.

Just like a curiosity of payment in war.

Best


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Rattler on 16 September 2009, 11:21:30
Absolutely great find, Solideo!

On the other hand, while it is "polvo" (in Spanish: "echar un polvo" = colloquial for "ejaculate"), I think at that time they (at least that is what my wife always explained to me) looked for words that sounded alike, but didn´t mean it, other examples: "gillipuertas" (instead of "gillipollas"), "ostras!" instead of "hostias", "puchas!" for "puta(da)!", etc.

Any chance the guy spelled it deliberately diffently?

Just thinking,

Rattler


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Solideo on 16 September 2009, 13:36:57
Absolutely great find, Solideo!

On the other hand, while it is "polvo" (in Spanish: "echar un polvo" = colloquial for "ejaculate"), I think at that time they (at least that is what my wife always explained to me) looked for words that sounded alike, but didn´t mean it, other examples: "gillipuertas" (instead of "gillipollas"), "ostras!" instead of "hostias", "puchas!" for "puta(da)!", etc.

Any chance the guy spelled it deliberately diffently?

Just thinking,

Rattler


Don´t belive that, I simply think the guy had the studies were usual in that time. Almost nothing I mean. In andaluz (Spanish way of accent of south Spain, and even part of Extremadura) when you say that sounds like "porvo" (remember the video clases de andaluz posted sometime ago). If your culture is limited probably you write it like sounds to you. He also says LA Lola, it´s not gramatically correct to put LA before the name of a person (nombre propio), although it´s quite usual in Catalonia and low culture speakers everywhere.

Those times were hard and probably political did much being "somebody" into the army without watching your curriculum.

Best, mate.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: the_13th_redneck on 20 September 2009, 18:47:03
Awesome find and an ingenius payment method.
Maybe "Lola" was slang for prostitute, hence the "la."


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Rattler on 20 September 2009, 20:45:17
Awesome find and an ingenius payment method.
Maybe "Lola" was slang for prostitute, hence the "la."



In southern Spain (and by uneducated people like me) it is common to add an article to a name, especially so if it is a nick name (though it is completely against grammatical rules): "Mari" becomes "La Mari", "Chucho" becomes "El Chucho":

Example: "Bebé" and "Mari Chambao", listen to the introduction (and the song of cause, which is a revelation) "la Mari" introduces "La Bebé":

Chambao y Bebe (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CIfRdoDg0U#normal)

And, Lola is not a synonym for prostitute that I knew of (but Solideo can comment better)

Rattler


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: erpace on 29 September 2009, 19:42:59
I am interested in selling the Alliierte Militarbehorde Marks that I have I have 4- Hundert Mark Bills, 1- Zwanzig Mark, 2- Funf Marks and 1-Eine Mark. They are Deutschland series 1944. I have no idea of the collector value. I got them when I was in the Army in Germany in 1976. I also have some Iraqui Money with Saddam Hussein's image on them. My daughter got them while serving in Baghdad 4 years ago. Would you be interested or know someone who is ?   Thank You Respectfully, Ellen R. Pace


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 29 September 2009, 21:48:54
I am interested in selling the Alliierte Militarbehorde Marks that I have I have 4- Hundert Mark Bills, 1- Zwanzig Mark, 2- Funf Marks and 1-Eine Mark. They are Deutschland series 1944. I have no idea of the collector value. I got them when I was in the Army in Germany in 1976. I also have some Iraqui Money with Saddam Hussein's image on them. My daughter got them while serving in Baghdad 4 years ago. Would you be interested or know someone who is ?   Thank You Respectfully, Ellen R. Pace


PM sent, erpace, with website advice to research values and request for scans.  I'm always interested!
(I also forgot to mention your local library:  they should have a Pick or Krause catalog with all of these items listed for you to see catalog values--which aren't equal to what a dealer would necessarily pay.)


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: erpace on 5 October 2009, 21:45:05
soon as i figure out how to scan them i will send them to you thanks


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 7 November 2009, 18:46:36
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Brazil198a100cruzeiros1981-84front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Brazil198a100cruzeiros1981-84back.jpg)
Breaking my rule--a bit--with this banknote. It's not really from war-time, but portrays a military leader, the Duke of Caxias, Luiz Alves de Lima e Silva, and a battle scene on the back.  The Duke was a leader from the 1850s to 1870s in Brazil.  This battle scene could be one from one of the separatist wars he fought in or the Paraguayan War (1864-70).
The note itself was issued c.1981-84.


Title: more Chinese banknotes, WWII
Post by: Alan65 on 7 November 2009, 18:57:20
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China238b10Yuan1941front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China238b10Yuan1941back.jpg)
10 yuan money from The Central Bank of China dated 1941.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China249a100yuan1942front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China249a100yuan1942back.jpg)
The 1942 100 Yuan note from the same bank.

(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China3055000Yuan1945front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/China3055000Yuan1945back.jpg)
the Central Bank of China's 1945 5,000 yuan note.  Notice the values going up because of war inflation and also that by this time, the English had been removed from the back.


Title: More WWII German Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 13 November 2009, 04:29:25
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany18520reichsmarks1939front.jpg)
this 20 reichsmark note was issued 16 April 1939 and shows a young woman holding edelweiss; a similar image was used on the 1936 Austria 100 schilling note.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany197b100marks1944front.jpg)
The 100 marks note pictured here is from the US Occupation authority and is similar to other denominations pictured in posts above.


Title: More WWII Italy Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 13 November 2009, 04:37:20
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Italy261lira1939front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Italy272lire1940front.jpg)
Pictured here are the 1- and 2- Lira notes from Italy issued in November of 1939.  Wikipedia tells us that in 1939, $1=19.8 lire so these are worth approximately a nickel and a dime at the time.


Title: Japan WWI Banknote
Post by: Alan65 on 13 November 2009, 04:46:33
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan30a1yen1916front.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Japan30a1yen1916back.jpg)
I really think Japanese paper money can be pretty so I'll show both the front and back of this note from 1916.  Similar to many banknotes of the early 20-th century, this one "promises to pay the bearer on demand One Yen in silver."


Title: Malta WWII Banknote
Post by: Alan65 on 13 November 2009, 04:50:42
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Malta161shilling1943uniface.jpg)
This is the 1943 issue of the 1 shilling note from Malta.  One shilling was 12 pence or 1/20th of a pound sterling.  King George VI is on the front; the back is blank.


Title: US Military Payment Certificates
Post by: Alan65 on 13 November 2009, 04:59:44
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/UnitedStatesM3250cents1954front.jpg)
The 50-cent note issued for US military personnel in Europe and Asia.  Series 521 was valid from 1954 to 1958.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/UnitedStatesM3010cents1954.jpg)
Here is the 10-cent copy.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: heidicasel on 24 February 2010, 04:26:52
would love any information on the WWII 1944, 100 paper money, Alliierte Militarbehorde. what is it worth? do banks in America buy them back? :salute:
thank you in advance


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 10 March 2010, 01:14:57
would love any information on the WWII 1944, 100 paper money, Alliierte Militarbehorde. what is it worth? do banks in America buy them back? :salute:
thank you in advance


sorry for the delay!

the 9-digit serial number notes can range in catalog value from $10 to $80 depending on condition; the 8-digit serial numbered notes from $5 to $a thousand (depends on condition and if there is a tiny 'F' in the scroll work.  The government doesn't buy them, but currency dealers and collectors do.  You should expect to pay around catalog value to buy them and expect to get less than that when selling.
there are 1/2 mark, 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 1,000 mark denominations.  It was valid only in the country printed on it, denominated in the local currency, valid for civilian and occupation troop use and under the direct control of the country's Commander in Chief of the Military Government.  You will notice French, Austrian, Japanese and Italian notes of similar design and use are also listed above.


Title: Algeria WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 May 2010, 22:04:40
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1173/4592975684_289fd28be3_o.jpg)
50 centimes note from 1944.  Issued when the French re-gained control of the area.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1429/4592977716_cb13145deb_o.jpg)
and here is the Algeria 2 franc note from the same year.


Title: Australia WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 May 2010, 22:09:53
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3382/4592977100_b21f63effa_o.jpg)
The Australia 10 shilling note of 1939.  This series was issued in 1939-40 and wasn't replaced until the '50s so it was used throughout the war.  It comes in 5-, 10-shillings, 1-, 5-, 10-, 50- and 100-pound sterling denominations. Almost all of the 50- and 100-pound notes were destroyed in 1958.


Title: Austria-Hungary WWI money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 May 2010, 22:14:46
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1330/4592356195_47d14a1463_o.jpg)
The Austro-Hungarian 2 Krone note from 1914-15.  Issued in 1-, 5- and 10-Kronen denominations, too.  It replaced the 1913-14 series and was soon replaced by 1916-18 issue which contained values up to 10,000 kronen (inflation was bad during the war!)


Title: Belgium WWI money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 May 2010, 22:22:31
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2621/4491427013_8b33c8c0fd_o.jpg)
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2743/4491428331_1cb94e60bc_o.jpg)
Paper money from Belgium issued during World War I.  The top note, a 20-franc bill, is dated 28 June 1919 but is otherwise identical to the design used from 1910 to 1920.  20 francs was the smallest denomination; they went up to 1,000 francs.
The 2nd note is from the German occupation period and dates from May 1918.


Title: Belgium WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 May 2010, 22:29:18
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4046/4492067546_d07cb4d6bc_o.jpg)
50 francs/10 belgas banknote from January, 1945.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2758/4491429363_a819d2ac85_o.jpg)
The 1943 100 francs/20 belgas banknote from Belgium.


Title: Bohemia-Moravia WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 May 2010, 22:33:15
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1404/4592387969_cdfacda532_o.jpg)
The 10 korun note from Bohemia-Moravia (an area the Germans made from part of Czechoslovakia in 1939).  It's part of the same series as the 20 korun note I posted on c.page 1 and was issued in 1942.


Title: Brazil WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 May 2010, 22:38:56
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1292/4592387417_78bd21d390_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1438/4592387327_e7f970dd0c_o.jpg)
the Brazil 1 cruzeiro note from 1944.  The back shows the Brazilian Naval School.

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3375/4593006330_799f73e891_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1210/4592387129_44b6c4d7f0_o.jpg)
The similar 2 cruzeiros note from the same year shows the Rezende Military School on the back.
Both notes are hand-signed by a government bank official.


Title: Burma WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 30 May 2010, 16:48:58
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4072/4546028705_521eeb32a1_o.jpg)
The 1 rupee note which the occupying Japanese printed for Burman.  It's one of the denominations I didn't have when I posted earlier.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4043/4546028649_2f763484d9_o.jpg)
I think the back looks like play-money!


Title: Cambodia Vietnam-era money
Post by: Alan65 on 30 May 2010, 16:53:56
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4053/4593015932_aa4c47424a_o.jpg)
The signatures on this 500 riels banknote from Cambodia date this to late 1968.  The beauty of this note is similar to many French colonies' paper money and give little hint to the 'killing fields' to come.


Title: Canada WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 30 May 2010, 17:01:41
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1260/4592396639_365a240de6_o.jpg)
Another WWII piece of paper money which I didn't have when I posted earlier.  This signatures date this to 1938-41 and shows King George VI.


Title: China WWI money
Post by: Alan65 on 30 May 2010, 17:10:11
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4021/4544448033_8193ddc95f_o.jpg)
Many early 20th-century China banknotes are beautiful and this c.1914 issue is no exception.  It was issued by the Bank of Communications in China but printed by the American Banknote Co. which did much early-20th century printing for foreign governments' paper money, stamps and US stamps as well.  this says "10 yuan of the national coinage of the Republic of China."


Title: China WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 31 May 2010, 17:25:18
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4021/4545083476_48b7167888_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4014/4545086058_24dcbcbcdb_o.jpg)
Here are the 1 yuan and 5 yuan notes from China issued in 1937, the year Japan fully invaded China thus beginning the war in ernest for these two countries. The Bank of China used Sun Yat Sen on a lot of its currency at this time.

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2175/4545084104_4568ce521f_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4068/4544453801_d44e7b50d9_o.jpg)
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2128/4545086308_864c94bf98_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4072/4544451295_ca8b624bab_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4033/4582458225_a664234898_o.jpg)
Here are the 5-, 10-, 25-, 50- and 100-yuan denomination banknotes for the same Bank of China 1940 issue.  The American Bank Note Co. printed the 1940 series while the English Thomas de la Rue Co. did the 1937 notes, above.


Title: more China WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 2 June 2010, 01:05:41
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2128/4544453327_acde6885e5_o.jpg)
1941 Bank of Communications 10 yuan banknote for China.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4072/4545081012_ea9d8f2730_o.jpg)
Central Bank of China 1942 10 yuan note.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4025/4544453535_4c73255369_o.jpg)
1945 500 yuan note with Sun Yat Sen at center.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4025/4583088118_de3cf92f80_o.jpg)
the Farmer's Bank of China's 10 yuan banknote from 1940.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4025/4545080596_7578d95c48_o.jpg)
Central Reserve Bank of China 1 yuan note from 1940.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4043/4544447107_1ec4c56ce0_o.jpg)
The 10 yuan note from the same bank and year.
the Central Reserve Bank of China was a 'puppet' bank of the Japanese government and occupying military forces.  In order to gain more acceptance, the Jpanaes put Sun Yat Sen (a national hero of the Chinese) and his masoleum--perhaps as a subtle jibe at him.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: FACman on 2 June 2010, 03:12:35
You continually amaze me with your collection!


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: MontyB on 2 June 2010, 03:21:24
I agree, it is a nice collection and it makes me a little annoyed that I gave away the war time script that my father came back with.

It contained everything from Syrian currency to post war German and Japanese occupation currency.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 2 June 2010, 21:24:10
Thanks, FACman and Monty!   Maybe that's why I'm a collector--never have to regret giving somthing away.  Wait, I actually sold the 500 mils Palestine money posted earlier.  I regret that even though I got $300 for it, selling to an Egyptian currency dealer. 
You made someone else happy, Monty. . .


Title: more China WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 2 June 2010, 21:38:55
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4020/4545079940_ef8b65dddf_o.jpg)
The 1943 500 yuan issue of the Japanese occupation forces and government.  Confucius is at right.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4069/4545084678_a4756b67fe_o.jpg)
The 1945 100 yuan note shows Huang Ti at right and the Imperial Resting Quarters on the left.
the iconography the Japanese chose is very interesting on many of these.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4037/4544453099_dd8e3b9340_o.jpg)
The same series in the 500 yuan denomination.  the Temple of Heavan is at left.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4048/4544447443_17e5c6a46a_o.jpg)
A 5 yen note issued in 1938.  It's a direct over-print of the contemporary 5 yen note in Japan (which didn't have the reddish characters; otherwise it was identical.)  This was used by Japanese in China, especially in the military, I believe.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4032/4545080118_c47edb3c62_o.jpg)
The 1945 100 yen military issue.  Again, similar to a then-current Japanese note except for the red over-print.  It also comes as black on green & violet and black on light blue (the note picture would be called light-brown on green.)


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: MontyB on 3 June 2010, 00:58:12
Thanks, FACman and Monty!   Maybe that's why I'm a collector--never have to regret giving somthing away.  Wait, I actually sold the 500 mils Palestine money posted earlier.  I regret that even though I got $300 for it, selling to an Egyptian currency dealer. 
You made someone else happy, Monty. . .


Actually I probably got the text wrong on that post, I didn't actually give them away they were given away accidentally during a period in which the family placed little value on these items (I have even given the location of an old well where 2 family members WW1 medals were dumped after the war, I am told that if I can recover the medals the military will replace the ribbons).

However having seen the collection you have I have decided to ask the person who has them about the possibility of buying them back and getting scanned copies of what he wants to keep.
 


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 3 June 2010, 03:48:00
It's a fun hobby, full of history and art; in your case it sounds like some close-to-home meaning, too. 


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: MontyB on 3 June 2010, 04:46:32
To be honest I am not sure where I would start a collection or how to go about starting it in the first place, with New Zealand being so far off the beaten track in terms of location and having a such a small population it would mean I am relegated to having to buy off the internet and I am not entirely trusting of that.

I think there is a certain level of meaning in it but I think it is less sentimental and more historical, I don't want to see these things lost to time because we as New Zealanders have very little sense of historical meaning.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 4 June 2010, 15:50:59
If there's a coin shop in your area, check there.  I find them at postcard shows, too. Any antique mall or estate sale is a potential treasure trove. I use Delcampe.com to buy and sell.  it's a Belgian auction site with servers for the US, UK, and many other countries (you don't have to speak French or German)  It's geared for collectors (mostly stamps, coins, postcards, etc. not the crap I see on e-bay) and is very friendly and the staff are helpful esp. compared to e-bay.


Title: more China WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 4 June 2010, 20:40:44
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4045/4545080694_78a9979ff7_o.jpg)
The Japanese Imperial government's 5 sen note, issued 1940, for Japanese military occupation of China.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4022/4545080644_c3fe52be81_o.jpg)
The 10 sen note in the same series.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4003/4582458607_a5e58b7e84_o.jpg)
The 1938 50 sen note of the same military government of Japan
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4045/4544447583_36a4b1dccf_o.jpg)
and the 1940 version. The difference is the title at top--7- versus 11-characters.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4028/4544447523_9ce372a7c6_o.jpg)
the 1 yen issue of the 1940 series.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4064/4545085590_33e8d33f24_o.jpg)
5 yen 1940 note.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4049/4544453911_d8d456ecfc_o.jpg)
1938 10 yen issue.
I don't have the 1-sen nor 100-yen notes (yet!)  All denominations come in the 7-character or 11-character title versions for the early and later issues.  If you see similar designs with different colors, they may be the Imperial Japanese government issues for other occupied areas like French Indo-China.


Title: more Fiji WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 4 June 2010, 20:52:13
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1240/4592447033_71d7f9b771_o.jpg)
The 1940 Fiji 5 shillings banknote showing George VI in semi-profile.  The 10 shilling and 1 pound notes were similar; the later 1-pound and all 5-, 10- and 20-pound notes have the same basic design but show the King facing full-front. (someday, I hope to show them here, too, but they run into the $1,000s)


Title: more France WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 4 June 2010, 21:14:52
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4022/4692013812_3ca78f104b_b.jpg)
The 50 francs note issued February 1940 during the 'Phony War'
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4014/4669442631_4df2f2f19f_b.jpg)
The French 5 francs note dated December 23, 1943.  There are many dates printed in the line at the bottom otherwise the design remained the same from 1943-47.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4031/4593062190_bc1be9e570_o.jpg)
The 50 francs 1944 note, called Allied Military Currency or Supplemental French Franc Currency.  This one differs from the one posted before in the wording at the sides:  "Emis en France" [issued in France] as opposed to just "FRANCE"
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4041/4593067482_a11c4b0ea8_o.jpg)
The 100 francs note from 1944. this one is the 2nd issue since it just says "FRANCE" unlike the note above it.  The numbers near the serial number can range from '2' to '10' (this one has a '5'.)


Title: France WWI money
Post by: Alan65 on 4 June 2010, 21:22:08
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1157/4592446651_7187ae26ba_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3466/4592446491_cc86c9458f_o.jpg)
Issued during World War I, these French Army Treasury notes were issued in 1917.  They were valid with French and Allied military cashiers and in regular banks in designated areas.  They expired after the 2nd year of the peace (whenever that would end up being.)  A second series was issued in 1919 "good until the end of the 4th year after the Armistice."  The 1917 series also came in a 2 francs note.


Title: French Indo-China WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 7 June 2010, 22:29:00
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4007/4592446339_15b7804ca3_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1161/4592446031_34fdace6c0_o.jpg)
The late-1930s 1 and 5 piastre notes from French Indo-china (Vietnam,Laos and Cambodia) issued by the Bank of Indo-china.  The 1 piastre note has the 1946 signature variety but otherwise is the same as that issued in 1936 and used through the initial years of the war.  The 5 piastre note was issued in 1936 and remained the same throughout the war.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1118/4592446193_bfcc44b587_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1212/4592445821_c4a3b8e048_o.jpg)
Gouvernement General de l'Indochine banknotes of 10 and 20 cents issued in 1939.  I believe these are Vichy French issued notes.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3056/4592447763_62c17751fe_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3383/4592447649_d026b029d5_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1207/4592447519_228044761c_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3321/4593066814_39e105c018_o.jpg)
The Government General changed the design in 1942.  Here are the 5-, 10-, 20- and 50-cent banknotes.  These were the only denominations issued in this series.


Title: French Indo-china First Vietnam War money
Post by: Alan65 on 7 June 2010, 22:41:15
These 2 pieces of paper money were in circulation when Vietnam gained its independence from France. 
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1315/4592447163_5cae062290_o.jpg)
the 1 piastre note of 1953 with Bao Dai at center.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1427/4593060136_405faca345_o.jpg)
The 1954 1 piastre note.
the 'Institut d'Emission des Etats du Cambodge du Laos et du Vietnam' was the money-issuing agency which formed after WWII when France granted some independence to French Indo-china and the resulting smaller areas were members of the French Union.
the above notes are from Vietnam (the back says "1 dong"--which was equivalent to the old 'piastre' and is in Vietnamese)


Title: Germany WWI money
Post by: Alan65 on 9 June 2010, 00:05:29
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany47b5marks5-8-14.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany48b20marks1914.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany49a50marks6digitserial.jpg)
The first Darlehenskassenschein (State Loan Currency Note), 5-, 20- and 50-mark notes issued August 1914.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany501mark12-8-14.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany542marks1914red.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany552marks1914blue.jpg)
and the second issue of 1914 included these 1- and 2-mark notes (the red seal/red serial number vs. blue seal/blue serial number is the only difference in the two 2-mark notes.)


Title: more Germany WWI money
Post by: Alan65 on 9 June 2010, 21:01:19
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4026/4545070324_8366311fa4_o.jpg)
1916 issue of Lithuania occupation State Loan Bank Currency--50 kopeck denomination; others were 20 kopeck, 1-, 3-, 10-, 25- and 100-rubels.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany56b5marks1917.jpg)
The 1917-18 issue of the State Loan Currency for 5 marks.  (The spelling was changed to "Darlehnskassenschein")

the next two are quite beautiful and I'll show both the front and back.  The first is the 20-mark version of the above 1917 issue.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany5720marks1918.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany5720marks1918back.jpg)

the next one is the Imperial Bank note for 20 marks issued in 1915.
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany6320marks1915.jpg)
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Banknotes/Germany6320marks1915back.jpg)


Title: more Germany WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 10 June 2010, 16:15:32
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4072/4688348610_ff81f291d8_b.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4059/4545069836_f13b03ff3c_o.jpg)
These notes were issued in 1929--after the hyper-inflation had been tamed but before Hitler's government took over--and show the 20- and 50-mark notes.  The 20 shows Werner von Siemens, the 50 David Hansemann.  The 20 was replaced in June, 1939, while the 50 was in use throughout the war and even re-issued (with some text added at left) in 1945.

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4010/4687715217_225d921d92_b.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4016/4688348786_5596c007ae_b.jpg)
Both of the above notes are considered military notes.  The 5 reichspfenning is an Auxilary Payment Certificate for the German Armed Forces and was issued in 1942. It is uniface (has a blank back.)  The 1 reichsmark note is a Clearing Note for German Armed Forces and was issued in September of 1944.  I am not sure what the purpose of a 'clearing note' was.

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4039/4544436987_7ddc1ed230_o.jpg)
This 20 reichsmark note was issued for use in Sudentenland and Lower Silesia in April 1945.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4036/4688348898_3349d699ce_b.jpg)
Finally, this 5 reichsmark note was issued for use in occupied territory and could have been seen circulating along with the local national currency. It dates from 1940-45.


Title: More Germany WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 11 June 2010, 19:12:45
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1300/4691435304_7c5d059dd6_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4029/4691435152_bb302f13d3_b.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1273/4691435522_f274a626a3_b.jpg)
As seen up-thread, the Allied occupation governments issued special currency for the defeated Germany.  (Italy and Japan got similar treatment with very similar-looking banknotes.)  Pictured above are the 5-, 10- and 50-mark denominations of this money.


Title: Cold War West Germany money
Post by: Alan65 on 11 June 2010, 19:22:00
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4015/4691434958_b510a85295_b.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4013/4691435412_efc4f5aaab_b.jpg)

Here is the 1-mark and half-mark banknotes from the early West German government, the Federal Republic of Germany.
When it became obvious that the various regions occupied by the US, France and Great Britain would not be unified with the regions occupied by the USSR, the Western powers decided to let Western Germany gain some independence.  One way to do this was to have new currency issued.  These lower denominations are somewhat similar to the occupation notes shown in earlier posts but--especially in the higher denominations which I hope to acquire some day. . . --they are distinct from the occupation designs (and thus memories.)
The 2-, 5- and 10-mark bills are like these pictured above; the 20-, 50- and 100-mark notes are a lot like US money design.


Title: US Civil War money
Post by: Alan65 on 12 June 2010, 00:24:32
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4015/4692016034_a21e9f9f2b_b.jpg)
My only example of Civil War money is this 50 cent note from the Confederate States of America ("the South") and dates from 1864.  The text on the left edge says that this money can be redeemed (for silver coin) 2 years after the peace treaty; the assumption is that after the South wins the war--or at least gets recognized by the North and the fighting stops--this money would be turned in for "real money", ie. silver.  It's hard to imagine taking this type of currency seriously, but this sort of condition is often used e.g. see the French WWI money above.


Title: Re: US Civil War money
Post by: MontyB on 12 June 2010, 02:29:28
([url]http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4015/4692016034_a21e9f9f2b_b.jpg[/url])
My only example of Civil War money is this 50 cent note from the Confederate States of America ("the South") and dates from 1864.  The text on the left edge says that this money can be redeemed (for silver coin) 2 years after the peace treaty; the assumption is that after the South wins the war--or at least gets recognized by the North and the fighting stops--this money would be turned in for "real money", ie. silver.  It's hard to imagine taking this type of currency seriously, but this sort of condition is often used e.g. see the French WWI money above.



I thought the USA used various types of currency up until quite recently aka around the early 1900s?


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 12 June 2010, 03:48:47
Monty, are you referring to different local banks issuing 'local' money? (yes, State banks did this until early 20th century).  Silver certificates vs. gold certificates?  (yes, we had paper money backed by silver and some backed by gold.  By 'backed' I mean you could take the paper money into any bank and get silver or gold coins of equal value for it.)  Not sure I follow what the question is.  My comment about it being hard to take this type of money seriously refers to 'this note will be exchangeable in 2 years time' type of conditions put on the value of the paper money.  It's done in war time, sometimes, but otherwise is more like a ponzi scheme.


Title: more Great Britain Armed Forces Special Vouchers
Post by: Alan65 on 13 June 2010, 16:27:54
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4003/4596847828_2b7df9ab4b_o.jpg)
The First Series of the UK Armed Forces Special Vouchers used in military canteens, with certain organizations and other special uses by military personnel.  This note was issued in 1946 for use by British forces occupying German and Austria; in 1947 it was used by occupying troops in Japan.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1354/4596847712_c91d5851e3_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3349/4596232357_747e97888e_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3059/4596847470_41d30d56a1_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1278/4596236923_eaecb2b5a5_o.jpg)
The Second Series was issued in 1948 and removed in 1971.  It was used world-wide by British forces.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1276/4596236725_15476a21aa_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1049/4596849222_7248fae481_o.jpg)
the 3rd Series was issued for the Suez Crisis in 1956.  The holes in the 10 shilling note mean that it has been cancelled (invalidated/rendered void.)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1082/4596233875_478ea264d6_o.jpg)
The Fourth Series was issued in 1962 and replaced by the Fifth Series soon thereafter.


Title: Greece WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 June 2010, 00:23:35
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4023/4596853182_374a253273_o.jpg)
The Greek state's 5 drachma issue from June, 1941.  Things were still not too bad for the economy.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3316/4596851678_81b7647a90_o.jpg)
this 5 million drachma note issued by the German occupiers in 1944 shows how quickly things can spiral out of control during a war.


Title: More Hong Kong WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 June 2010, 00:30:23
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3063/4596850856_08861b5ee1_o.jpg)
The Hong Kong 1 Dollar bill issued in 1936 in use when the war began and replaced with a blue one like it in 1940 or '41.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3315/4596237747_90f4ebd621_o.jpg)
The Hong Kong 10-cent note issued in 1941.  Again, this small denomination bill was not valid for amounts more than 2 dollars.


Title: More Iceland WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 June 2010, 00:40:01
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4013/4701692728_e3e400d518_b.jpg)
Here is the 1945 issue from Iceland of their 1 krona banknote.  Again, the years of issue are distinguished by the color of the bill--this one is blue on yellow-ish paper--and the serial numbers.  (Compare it to the brown 1 krona note in an earlier post.)


Title: More Italy WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 June 2010, 00:43:15
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1065/4596249219_1f0d4f213f_o.jpg)
This 1 lira note was issued in November, 1944; Italy had capitulated but the war raged on.  It is rather small, measuring 78mm x 42 mm, and came in 2-, 5- and 10-lira denominations, too.


Title: More Japan WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 June 2010, 20:19:30
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1243/4596261087_6101ef1b7b_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4055/4596872686_148de84c79_o.jpg)
The 5 and 10 yen notes issued in 1930 and replaced in 1942.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3379/4596260513_8c0237d7ba_o.jpg)
The 1944 100-yen banknote.


Title: More Japan WWI money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 June 2010, 20:23:50
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3361/4596260393_e5e29e9fff_o.jpg)
10 sen note issued c1917-21 during World War I.  This Great Imperial Japanese Government 'Paper Money' issue also came in 20- and 50-sen denominations.  there was a 20-yen coin but otherwise it seems there really wasn't a whole lot of money in circulation in Japan in the late 1910s.


Title: More Japan WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 16 June 2010, 23:55:12
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3360/4596875074_5508fbe2c5_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3145/4596259965_e24447870e_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4050/4596877374_0e53dd8387_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1416/4596877262_200c614b2a_o.jpg)
Pictured above are more Allied Occupation currency from my collection.  The notes with a 'A' behind the serial number in the center were 1946 while the ones with a 'B' were issued for use in 1945 (yes, the 'B' appears to have come first.)  The 'A' is much more rare; for the 10 sen notes, it's a differnce of a few dollars but for the 100 yen note the price difference for a collector is in the $100s.


Title: Re: More Japan WWII money
Post by: MontyB on 17 June 2010, 01:19:23
Pictured above are more Allied Occupation currency from my collection.  The notes with a 'A' behind the serial number in the center were 1946 while the ones with a 'B' were issued for use in 1945 (yes, the 'B' appears to have come first.)  The 'A' is much more rare; for the 10 sen notes, it's a differnce of a few dollars but for the 100 yen note the price difference for a collector is in the $100s.


Wow that is odd as I have about 30 of those A notes buried somewhere in my collection, my father was part of J-Force after the war and returned with a sizable collection of them.


Title: More Japan WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 17 June 2010, 23:33:36
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3380/4596262861_028a066975_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4072/4596874656_d13b03de87_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1283/4596258995_c678d4301c_o.jpg)
Pictured above are the 5-, 10- and 100-yen notes issued by the Bank of Japan in 1945-46.  It's unclear to me whether or not the 10-yen note which was issued in 1945 was issued during or after the war.  The Bank of Japan history doesn't mention what was going on in August/September of '45 in this matter.  The money didn't change appearance too much during and after the war.


Title: Korea WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 17 June 2010, 23:38:08
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3375/4596888950_37c1407e6f_o.jpg)
My lone Korean banknote of 1944 is rather worn to be sure.  Its value is 10 yen and was issued by the Japanese Empire of which Korea was a 'government general' (like Poland was of Germany during the war.)


Title: More Malaya WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 19 June 2010, 05:45:05
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1228/4596890596_b90b75fb19_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1227/4596274247_77bcf905fe_o.jpg)
the Japanese occupation banknotes issued for Malaya in 1942 ($5) and 1944 ($100) with very similar designs to almost all of the other Japanese WWII occupation notes pictured in this thread.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4033/4596888670_d7f8f52442_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3446/4596275795_d578c23307_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3417/4596273343_03dc451837_o.jpg)
Although the date printed on these notes says 1941, they were all issued in 1945 after the war.  This series of banknotes had a huge range of denominations from 1-cent to 10,000 dollars ($10k being a reported but not confirmed value according to my catalog.)


Title: Mexico Revolution 1910-1917 money
Post by: Alan65 on 19 June 2010, 17:29:57
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4053/4596886518_e0654f8c09_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3353/4596274589_939872243e_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1198/4596274359_fd912d6223_o.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3292/4596887538_98fa90ac54_o.jpg)
The Mexican Revolution produced many different banknotes from many different states of Mexico.  The four pictured above were issued by the state of Chihuahua in 1914 and '15.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4055/4596275007_b36dd6f697_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1299/4596274791_0d43c4ebd5_o.jpg)
These 2 beautiful banknotes were issued by the Provisional Government of Mexico at Veracruz  in February of 1915.  Besides the 1 and 2 peso bills, there were 10, 20, 50 and 100 peso denominations.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1288/4596275277_6c271aca3b_o.jpg)
This note is uncatalogued; it may come from a local organization which issued scrip although with the serial number and fairly nice paper quality and design it may be somewhat widely used/issued by an official organization.  Tlalpujahua Michoacan did issued some 'official' money but not this one.


Title: Morocco WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 21 June 2010, 18:36:29
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1066/4596272363_8d6d7e7d38_o.jpg)
This design for the 5 franc note was first issued in 1922; this copy is dated November 1941, during the Vichy government of France's North African colonies.


Title: More Netherlands Indies WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 21 June 2010, 18:42:20
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3323/4596908552_287d98712b_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4061/4596293675_b06784de64_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1250/4596293595_e7034e10c7_o.jpg)
Here are more denominations for the Japanese Occupation currency issued for use in the Dutch East Indies/Netherland Indies (the future Indonesia).
The 10-cent and half-gulden notes were issued in 1942; inflation once again raised its ugly head when the Japanese issued paper money without regard for finding a way to back it and the 100 gulden note of 1944 was the result.


Title: Norway WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 21 June 2010, 18:45:10
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1260/4596909506_8e9d76e071_o.jpg)
Norway's 1 krone banknote was issued in 1917.  This was actually not replaced by a new design until 1940.


Title: Norway WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 21 June 2010, 18:47:28
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1088/4596293795_a84f6e364f_o.jpg)
Here is the 1940 [well, this one's dated 1944] Norway 1 krone banknote issued during WWII which replaced the above 1917 1 krone bill.  They look fairly similar to me and are the same size.


Title: More Philippines WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 23 June 2010, 18:49:39
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4058/4596926942_c95d038881_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1124/4596927012_23beffdd75_o.jpg)
After the war left the Philippines, this note was issued by the Central Bank of the Philippines (c.1949); the back has the "Victory" overprint like one I posted earlier but also has the bank name added in red.  this one also came in denominations up to 500 pesos.

(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1340/4596311727_a50dd1cb90_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1385/4596312075_1e7467eceb_o.jpg)
During the war, numerous provinces and 'currency committees' issued money for use in guerrilla-held areas.  Pictured above are two examples.  There are hundreds of issues and desgins.


Title: Portugal WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 23 June 2010, 18:55:01
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3170/4596923312_08fdacb038_o.jpg)
The 5 centavo note from Portugal issued in April of 1918.


Title: Russia WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 23 June 2010, 19:05:49
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2683/4491519169_a6a2eb8547_o.jpg)
Russian paper money is some of the most beautiful, in my opinion.  Pictured above is the 1899 issue of the 50-ruble note.  The signature tell us this was issued between 1912-17 and in use during WWI until the Revolution.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4066/4491519773_b100380b7e_o.jpg)
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2760/4491519507_ed7711c812_o.jpg)
These 3- and 10-ruble notes are from the 1902-12 issue; again, the Shipov signature (the one on the left on the 3-ruble note/the one that starts in the '0' of the '10' lower center of the 10-ruble note) tells us these are from 1912-17.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2685/4491520013_d7440f0c12_o.jpg)
Yes, this bill clearly has '1898' printed on it at center bottom; it is however from a 1915-1917 issue of the 1-ruble note.  The serial number prefix probably indicates that this copy was actually issued by the Provisional Government (the one between the Tsar and a full Communist take-over which briefly ruled in 1918.)  I'm not 100% sure on this one!


Title: More Russia WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 June 2010, 01:51:53
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4023/4491521503_437d2a6681_o.jpg)
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2730/4491521403_0a8d5b4339_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4013/4491521257_39db2c88e9_o.jpg)
The 3 notes above are from the 1915 'Small Change' series.  There were 2-, 3-, 10-, 15- and 20-kopeck notes, too.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4018/4491518327_8033d45eaa_o.jpg)
This banknote is from the Russian Government Credit Note Series of 1917 and is good for 250 rubles.  The serial number actually tells us this was issued by the Soviet government, but the Tsar's notes looked identical (except for the different serial numbers.)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4059/4492158286_077ff6a857_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4039/4492158340_e64bcb1b88_o.jpg)
The 20- and 40-ruble notes from 1917 issued by the Kerensky government (the main one in between the Tsar and Lenin), these were based on consular stamp designs and are rather small--c.6.2 x 5.5 cm including the borders.


Title: More Russia WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 29 June 2010, 17:12:18
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4022/4546653490_fef0eb2e43_o.jpg)
100 ruble 1918 'Government Credit Note', issued after fall of Tsar but before Communists took over.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4040/4492163840_5d7dfa0c97_o.jpg)
500-ruble State Treasury Note from 1918. 
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4020/4546653338_547e9ef622_o.jpg)
I consider this and the next ones more from the Russian Civil War than WWI but since they over-lapped, I'll post them here.  This one is from Odessa, where a Ukrainian government issued 'Exchange Notes of Odessa Area'.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4015/4491515465_6463bba38c_o.jpg)
South Russia 100-ruble banknote issued in 1919.  It's really a work of art!
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4017/4491514167_86297f0455_o.jpg)
Transcaucasian Commissariat 100-ruble banknote, issued 1918.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4050/4492160524_159d9292b9_o.jpg)
The Azerbaijan Socialist Soviet Republic's 5 million ruble note of 1923.  Shown here to prove the inflation of the time and show the various Soviet Republics of the USSR had issued their own money in the early years.


Title: Russian Civil War Money
Post by: Alan65 on 30 June 2010, 19:28:43
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4015/4546019827_0bb0a36861_o.jpg)
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2781/4491524823_6fb0d5451d_o.jpg)
The above are the 1918 5- and 10-rubles banknotes issued by the Siberian Provisional Administration (1st issue).  There was also a 1-ruble note.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2680/4492162748_c3edba7252_o.jpg)
The 3-ruble denomination of the 2nd issue for the same Administration.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2702/4492152348_55de1fdf06_o.jpg)
Siberian Administration's 5% Debenture notes (kind of like bonds, I think); the above is the 25-ruble note from May 1919.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2693/4491521791_66c754cc6a_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4016/4492160276_aaa13d56f1_b.jpg)
The 50- and 1,000-ruble notes from June 1919.


Title: More Russian Civil War Money
Post by: Alan65 on 1 July 2010, 20:15:13
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4057/4546653746_68d1b6d5c8_o.jpg)
the above banknote is from the Siberian Krasnoyarsk Territory and was issued in 1919.  This one is 25-rubles but also came in 1, 3, 5 and 10 rubles.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4025/4546020135_64d47133bb_o.jpg)
This 1920 100-ruble note comes from Chita in Eastern Siberia.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4071/4491515603_1099d896ab_o.jpg)
50-kopeks denomination from Priamur region of Eastern Siberia also from 1920.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2700/4492158980_a821a32b9b_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4034/4492159080_2b04eaa4c9_o.jpg)
The above scans show both sides of a curious note I found in a local coin shop.  I believe it's from the US occupation of Vladivostok c1919-20 and represents a coupon/'money' usable in the "American Grill" (a local restaurant?).  I found two and sold one to a collector in Vladivostok who is attempting to find out more but so far has come up empty.  This is a 1-ruble note and a 3-ruble note has sold on a large currency auction several years ago as well.  The bottom line in English and Russian don't quite match--the Russian says, roughly, 'redeemable for 1 ruble'/'you will be re-imbursed 1 ruble'.  Very curious!
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2756/4491520657_5a49817846_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4051/4546020275_7e43498a62_o.jpg)
2 more unknown/uncatalogued notes representing WWI/Russian Civil War 'coupons' good for money + interest at some future date.


Title: Serbia WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 2 July 2010, 19:52:09
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3304/4596939036_fd1125bd2c_o.jpg)
This 100 dinara Serbia banknote from German occupation issued in May 1941.  It is the 1929 Yugoslavia issue over-printed with "Serbia" [looks like CPnCKNX with new signatures.] It was issued by the Serbian National Bank.


Title: Sweden WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 2 July 2010, 19:54:45
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1414/4596323071_39160784da_o.jpg)
This 1946 Sweden banknote is the same--except for the date at left--as that from 1918 to 1952.  This 5 kronor note would have been seen at the end of WWI and throughout WWII.


Title: Ukraine WWI/Russian Civil War Money
Post by: Alan65 on 2 July 2010, 20:00:46
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3202/4596338355_2aea5ab968_o.jpg)
When the Russian Empire collapsed, Eastern Ukraine declared its independence in January, 1918; Western Ukraine followed in November 1918.  The paper currency pictured above is from the 1918 State Credit Note issue.  Ukraine was soon absorbed into the USSR, Romania, Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hungary.  The Germans briefly revived hopes of an independent Ukraine in 1941-4 but Ukrainians had to wait until 1991 for their own country.


Title: More US Military Payment Certificates Money
Post by: Alan65 on 2 July 2010, 20:07:30
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3607/4596958180_3e7551888a_o.jpg)
I've described Military Payment Certificates in an early post.  This 5-cent note is from the first series, #461.  It was issued in Europe for occupying US troops on 16 September, 1946, and two weeks later in Japan and Korea for the Pacific Theatre.  It was withdrawn 10 March, 1947.  (A very short period of use!)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1161/4596342189_c9ef8f8b33_o.jpg)
Series 471 replaced the above 461 on 10 March, 1947, and withdrawn on 22 March, 1948.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: FACman on 3 July 2010, 05:08:02
We used to call the MPCs monopoly money.


Title: More US Military Payment Certificates
Post by: Alan65 on 3 July 2010, 17:00:12
Here's some more Monopoly Money for FACman
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1183/4596342065_20e7b02a1d_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1383/4596953336_a95c974dc8_o.jpg)
Series 472 was valid 22 March, 1948 through 20 June, 1951.  Here are the 5- and 10-cent denominations.  It's interesting to see "War Zone" written on the left edge of the 10-cent MPC.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3258/4596337351_45e880c7e5_o.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4071/4596341907_0f06ef5150_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1204/4596957528_1445626ce8_o.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1339/4596957440_0f31a29864_o.jpg)
Series 481 was next and was valid 20 June, 1951 through 25 May, 1954; Korean War veterans would remember this design.  I've also shown the back of the $1 note which was similar to all of the denominations in this series.


Title: More US Military Payment Certificates
Post by: Alan65 on 5 July 2010, 19:35:57
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4046/4596340025_107f52ac3e_o.jpg)
Series 521 (25 May, 1954-27 May, 1958) was used by US troops throughout the world.  Here is the 5-cent denomination; the 50-cent note is shown in an earlier post.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3337/4596341797_9c3a39cce6_o.jpg)
Series 541 replaced 521 and was valid until 26 May, 1961


Title: More US Military Payment Certificates
Post by: Alan65 on 5 July 2010, 19:39:19
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4015/4596338897_9f1e5230d7.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1166/4596332605_52ccdc478e.jpg)
more Series 541 notes.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4056/4596339895_590ecf0f75.jpg)
Series 591 replaced 541 and was valid until 6 January, 1964, in the Pacific and 14 January, 1964, in Europe.


Title: More US Military Payment Certificates
Post by: Alan65 on 6 July 2010, 19:13:59
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3202/4596957038_aae65f1a4a.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1401/4596956896_87c4258c98.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1265/4596956580_48966e7e68.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3336/4596953116_d5c877794c.jpg)
Series 611 was valid 6 January, 1964, and withdrawn 28 April, 1969.  It was used in Cyprus, Libya, Korea and Japan.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1388/4596332417_756198fb01.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1434/4596338219_29528c5bff.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3577/4596948202_57f8de3ee9.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1433/4596954028_9849fb60b2.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1136/4596341535_de56cc9dbd.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3400/4596953976_4571664ee6.jpg)
Series 641 was issued 31 August, 1965 and withdrawn 21 October, 1968.  It was for use in Vietnam only.


Title: More US Military Payment Certificates
Post by: Alan65 on 7 July 2010, 17:38:45
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3612/4596332231_5aefed7e74.jpg)
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3258/4596947964_2ca85a2870.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4057/4596332027_afa7ecfb54.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1371/4596331925_3177992d6e.jpg)
Series 661 was for use in Vietnam.  It was issued 21 October, 1968, and withdrawn 11 August, 1969.

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4070/4596339737_cb02859cbd.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1201/4596955644_37011e0fca.jpg)
Front and back of 10-cent denomination of Series 681.  I think the back design (the same on the 5-, 25- and 50-cent notes) is interesting in its choice of themes, celebrating the July, 1969, moon landing.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1353/4596331803_aee0f1660e.jpg)
Series 681 was issued for use in Vietnam on 11 August, 1969, and withdrawn on 7 October, 1970.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: FACman on 8 July 2010, 02:03:54
I was in Vietnam for the 661 & 681 series. I used to carry about $300 at all times, as we were always playing cards during down time.


Title: South Vietnam Vietnam War Money
Post by: Alan65 on 8 July 2010, 19:06:18
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1032/4596321843_60f023edf3.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4067/4596349351_b25097097b.jpg)
National Bank of Vietnam 5- and 10-dong banknotes issued in 1955, one year after the Geneva Treaty which broke up the French IndoChina colonies.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1185/4596964984_39d086908b.jpg)
The 1962 National Bank of Vietnam 10-dong banknote.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3367/4596965298_a36db7ba85.jpg)
The 1964 20-dong issue from the same bank.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1176/4596349103_9c7de74268.jpg)
By 1966, inflation had made this 100-dong note necessary.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3366/4596937726_95cc71f28a.jpg)
It's not clear to me why two different 100-dong banknotes were required, but this one also came out in 1966.
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1219/4596348711_3293329538.jpg)
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1236/4596348835_fc131dc10b.jpg)
The above 2 notes were issued by the Central Committee of the National Front For the Liberation of South Vietnam.  They were meant for use in territory controlled by the National Liberation Front (the Communists) but were never issued. A large number were captured by the US and ARVN which is probably how I got them!


Title: More Algeria WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 17 July 2010, 20:42:21
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4100/4802031853_a45eae916b.jpg)
1942 20-franc banknote from Algeria.  Dated November 11, this would be issued under an Allied government after the Vichy government and the Germans left.


Title: More Bohemia & Moravia WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 17 July 2010, 20:47:23
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4135/4802671176_3c69729aaa.jpg)
1942 500-korun banknote from Bohemia and Moravia, a German Protectorate during WWII which is now most of the Czech Republic.


Title: Bolivia WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 17 July 2010, 20:49:06
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4802041667_d79c2d08d4.jpg)
1945 Bolivian 5-bolivianos banknote.


Title: More Cambodia Vietnam War era Money
Post by: Alan65 on 17 July 2010, 20:52:11
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4134/4802680654_a7c9b73c59.jpg)
This 100-riels banknote from Cambodia was the design from 1954-72; the signatures date this to 1972.


Title: More China WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 18 July 2010, 17:16:53
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4080/4802054833_cef6b26017.jpg)
1941 50-fen/5-chiao banknote issued by Japanese puppet government in Manchukuo (Manchuria), China.  Ch'ien Lung is pictured at right.


Title: More French West Africa Money
Post by: Alan65 on 18 July 2010, 17:20:03
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4074/4802059259_6a8f40dde9.jpg)
This French West Africa 5-franc banknote was issued in May, 1942.


Title: More Germany WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 18 July 2010, 17:23:40
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4116/4802065009_db1dec56a2.jpg)
20-mark note issued February, 1914, but still in use until August, 1914.


Title: More Germany WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 18 July 2010, 17:30:15
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4114/4802694464_ae40a29de3.jpg)
Dated 24 June, 1935, this 100-mark note would have been used during WWII.  The swastika in the middle kind of ruins (to a modern viewer) an otherwise very attractive design.  Justus von Liebig is pictured at right.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4140/4802694644_8b171ec0ed.jpg)
This 50-reichsmark note is a Reich's Credit Treasury Note, issued for use in German occupied territories during WWII.  It was used from 1940-45.


Title: More Hong Kong WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 20 July 2010, 19:14:09
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4141/4802701522_6327924f33.jpg)
I have showed lower denomination banknotes in this series.  Here is the 1 dollar bill for Hong Kong issued 1940-41.


Title: More Japan WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 20 July 2010, 19:24:02
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4076/4802709164_75826c1743.jpg)
The 1946 50-sen Allied Occupation banknote for Japan.  The 'A' in the underprint determines that this is from 1946.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4118/4802709002_c72b55dc9d.jpg)
Again, the 'A' in the uderprint tells us that this is from 1946.  (I'm still not sure why the 'B' was issued first, in 1945.)


Title: Latvia WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 20 July 2010, 19:30:18
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4081/4802084757_43ab2b7406.jpg)
This is the 1-rublis 1919 Latvia money issued by Riga's Workers Deputies' Soviet.  I just finished reading "The World on Fire:  1919 and the Battle with Bolshevism"  http://www.amazon.com/World-Fire-1919-Battle-Bolshevism/dp/0393061248 (http://www.amazon.com/World-Fire-1919-Battle-Bolshevism/dp/0393061248) and learned a bit about the workers' soviets set up by communists in the Baltic States newly-liberated countries.  This soviet was very short-lived.  The British Navy aided the non-Communists and there were German-led troops fighting there, too.


Title: More Malaya WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 21 July 2010, 18:06:35
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4079/4802714592_6ee4a73cfa.jpg)
Dated 1 July, 1941, this Malaya 20-cent banknote was actually issued in 1945.  King George VI is at left.


Title: More Netherlands WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 21 July 2010, 18:15:13
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4119/4802090907_c9f4dbf3b7.jpg)
The Netherlands 20 gulden banknote; this one is dated 19 March, 1941.  Queen Emma is at right.  I like old sailing ships so this note is especially attractive to me.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4137/4802720976_569b450f7b.jpg)
10-gulden note of June, 1943.  The girl at right is from a Moreelse painting c.17th century--also an attractive banknote.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4080/4802091355_26143d4cff.jpg)
The 1938 2 1/2 gulden 'silver note' from the Netherlands was in use when WWII started.  I think this note is like a US silver certificate in that it says there's 2 and a half gulden in silver deposited in the Bank of the Netherlands.  (does it say you can get silver for it at any time, like the US silver certificate? )


Title: More Philippines WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 21 July 2010, 18:20:59
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4142/4802095183_ab61217a5e.jpg)
This is the 20-peso denomination of the 1944 Treasury Emergency Currency Certificate Issue by the Philippine government.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: the_13th_redneck on 22 July 2010, 02:56:05
Can anyone tell me why they issued pay certificates instead of real money?


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: FACman on 22 July 2010, 06:18:56
Quote
Can anyone tell me why they issued pay certificates instead of real money?


In Vietnam, I believe it was done to keep 'greenbacks' off the Black Market. The occasional changing series of the MPCs was to penalize their unauthorized use by civilians, since at changeover, only military personnel could exchange the old notes for the new ones. This left untold, virtually worthless notes in the hands of the black marketeers.

Thats my take on it, from the 'scuttlebutt' we heard while in country.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 22 July 2010, 17:26:53
Quote
Can anyone tell me why they issued pay certificates instead of real money?


In Vietnam, I believe it was done to keep 'greenbacks' off the Black Market. The occasional changing series of the MPCs was to penalize their unauthorized use by civilians, since at changeover, only military personnel could exchange the old notes for the new ones. This left untold, virtually worthless notes in the hands of the black marketeers.

Thats my take on it, from the 'scuttlebutt' we heard while in country.


That's the official reason as well.  If you notice the dates of issue and withdrawal, it was often roughly at one year intervals but not always.  The old notes became worthless over-night and without warning.  Would you use 'money' like that?  Authorized personnel didn't have to worry about it; civilians and black marketeers did.  A soldier wouldn't want US dollars in his pocket, anyway--say, FACMan:  did you even carry a wallet all the time?
Now, I imagine the an MPC would have more value on the black market when the new series first came out but as time went by they became less and less desirable to anyone but authorized users.  Also, if MPCs were the only kind of currency a soldier had in his pockets, he was a bit limited in what he could buy--officially sanctioned items were easier to buy than, oh, say, illegal items . . .


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: FACman on 22 July 2010, 18:37:30
Quote
FACMan:  did you even carry a wallet all the time?


Yes I did. Where else was I going to carry my money (~ $300-$400 MPC (gambling money) & 10-20 $1 Greenbacks (Greenbacks were emergency money, worth a lot more on Black Market than MPC))   and lets not forget the pictures of my GF? Your wallet was your own little corner of the world. A place where you could remember that there was another world beyond this one of pain, misery and death. I didnt know anyone who didnt have a wallet.


Title: More Poland WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 22 July 2010, 19:22:11
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4118/4802725164_ee8734810b.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4138/4802725080_d6996c2fd0.jpg)
The 2- and 5-zloty denomination banknotes of Poland.  Issued by the Emission Bank of Poland--a nazi 'puppet' bank--these notes were issued 1 August, 1941.


Title: More Russia WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 22 July 2010, 19:30:39
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4075/4802731560_2907d032c7.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4101/4802101379_576b194ccf.jpg)
The 1918 25-ruble Government Credit Note of the interim government set up between the fall of the Tsar and the Communist Party take-over. 
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4075/4802101517_313dc0ff11.jpg)
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4082/4802731284_105ccfb737.jpg)
Here is the 3-ruble State Treasury Note from Russia which came out a bit after the top one.

I show the front and back of these 2 notes to show the beauty of the top note--it's really stunning--and to show the common design element of all non-Communist Russia money and stamps:  the double-headed eagle which represented the Imperial family and thus Imperial Russia.


Title: More Russian Civil War Money
Post by: Alan65 on 22 July 2010, 19:36:35
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4095/4802101615_a03e0889b7.jpg)
This is the 1-ruble Credit Note from the 'Far Eastern Republic', a government set up on the eastern edge of Lake Baikal stretching toward the east until it ran into the various other 'governments' set up around Vladivostok and the Pacific in the far east of Siberia.  The printing is cruder and the paper quality lower than a lot of earlier money shown above.
US troops did get as far west as this area when occupying eastern Siberia in 1918-1920.


Title: Sweden WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 22 July 2010, 19:41:19
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4118/4802735660_c187e1fe56.jpg)
The design of the 1 krona banknote from Sweden didn't change--except for the date printed in the upper left and right--between 1914 and 1940.  This note is dated 1918.  The 5-kroner note was the same from 1918 to 1952 but the 100-kroner didn't change from 1918-1954!


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 22 July 2010, 19:49:18
This brings us up-to-date on my collection of paper money used in wartime.  If anyone is interested in the whole collection, see my Flickr account (alanp_photo) which shows nearly all of it including banknotes which fall outside of this rather large sub-collection of The Money of War.
I am continuously adding to my collection and when I get a large enough batch, I'll add more images here.  Thanks for looking!


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: the_13th_redneck on 23 July 2010, 14:17:48
seriously great stuff!


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: harrisr on 20 November 2010, 00:04:08
 :D So... I have some things that would go along with your collection... I don't really know what they are, but I have alot of the same WWII French/Belgium and German including the stuff made in Boston. It was great that you shared them with everyone and gave a description. Thank you. I'm going to share the site with my kids.  Here are some pretty ladies for you... not the greatest scan, but if you have setting advice, I can redo.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 20 November 2010, 01:55:37
thanks for sharing, harrisr! 
I don't have either of those Luxembourg notes, very nice!  On the 50f note, there is a serial number on the back; is the prefix letter 'A' or a later letter?  (the 'A's are a bit more rare.)

My images here are all linked from my Flickr account so I use one of the 'share this picture' functions found there with each image to embed some of the code which automatically shows the banknotes how you see them here.  I'd love to see more!  If you want some help identifying any of the ones you don't know about let me know, too.


Title: More Austria WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 27 March 2011, 18:57:21
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Austria10950Schilling1944.jpg)

50 schilling note issued in 1944 by the Allied Military Authority; similar to the 1 schilling shown in reply #2, above.


Title: More Germany WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 27 March 2011, 18:59:54
(http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x241/Alanp_photo/Germany18010marks1924.jpg)

This 10-mark note from Germany is dated 1924 but was issued in the mid-1930s and re-issued in 1945 with a different watermark on the left edge. 


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 5 November 2011, 23:15:28
Hi, I just discovered this place.  I have a few wartime notes, mostly the common and cheap ones: for me it's just a hobby, if I see a note I can afford I will buy it. 

I have seen plenty of notes for Austria - Allierte Militaerbehoerde - and for the US zone of Germany, but never anything at all for the French and British zones.  Were any notes ever issued?  Can anyone point me at URLs with pix thereof?

Thanks,

Richard


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 6 November 2011, 00:13:39
I have seen plenty of notes for Austria - Allierte Militaerbehoerde - and for the US zone of Germany, but never anything at all for the French and British zones.  Were any notes ever issued?  Can anyone point me at URLs with pix thereof?



I hadn't ever thought about it in these terms; I assumed "Allied Military" currency meant that the currency I've shown here was used throughout Germany after WWII.

I found these listings on a site which is both commericial (notes for sale) and informational.
http://www.atsnotes.com/catalog/banknotes/germany-french-ccupation.html (http://www.atsnotes.com/catalog/banknotes/germany-french-ccupation.html)
it shows notes used in French Occupied Germany in 1947.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 6 November 2011, 17:50:37
That's exactly the kind of information I was looking for - Thanks!

Unfortunately the prices are a bit steep - the notes I have cost pennies.  However, it does prove that the Soviet, US and French zones each issued currency.  This just leaves the Brits as an unknown.

It was a wry joke in the UK that "The French got the vineyards, the Yanks got the tourist areas and we got the ruins" - however, the British Army is still there, at the request of the Germans themselves; until 1994 they were called BAOR (British Army on the Rhine) and now BFG (British Forces Germany), and will remain there until 2020.  I'm not entirely sure what there role is in the post-Cold-War era. BAOR cars, both official and owned by the families of servicemen,  used to have distinctive numberplates; this was discontinued as the IRA targetted such vehicles during the Troubles.  I'm sure that if they went as far as having special numberplates, they must have had some kind of currency before the Bank Deutsche Laender was set up.

The search continues!

Thanks again!


Title: More Austria WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 27 January 2012, 06:00:50
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7023/6723271039_ffbcd99703.jpg)

Here is the latest Austria Allied Occupation money from WWII, 1944.  This 5 schilling note has  small corner tear.


Title: More Bohemia & Moravia WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 27 January 2012, 06:04:24
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7161/6723312277_831d3f9466.jpg)

This 1 crown note from Bohemia & Moravia dates from 1940.  The wear indicates it saw a lot of use.


Title: British Guiana WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 28 January 2012, 18:02:48
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7020/6723312103_f7aeb1d262.jpg)

This British Guiana 1 Dollar note was issued in 1942.  Not much fighting in South America during WWII but some troops from colonies and Brazil saw action.


Title: More China WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 28 January 2012, 18:20:24
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7173/6723336555_aa623135b8.jpg)

This Chinese 5 yuan note was issued in 1935, during the Japanese occupation war before WWII 'officially' started. 

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7015/6723336311_63e0311337.jpg)
A 10 yuan note issued in 1937.

Both notes were from the Bank of China and issued 'national' currency (as opposed to locally issued and used money.)  These notes were meant to be recognized everywhere within China.
A curious thing about these two is the tape marks on both end and the signature on the 10 yuan note.  I believe these were made into "short snorters" which were paper money taped together and signed by servicemen (and women!).  They were signed and often dated with even a ship the sailor served on listed.  Some I have are signed by captains of US navy ships.  The tape really detracts from the note and these have been separated.  I've seen strings of close to 40 pieces strung together and signed by 100 people.  The longer the strand the better (more rare.)  These are still curious pieces--and the only example of these particular notes in my collection--but if I find undamaged examples, I'll take them.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 29 January 2012, 17:47:44
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7174/6723335045_12e5bea704.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7158/6723334835_24753279bd.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7020/6723334183_08aa982178.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7023/6723333885_298197a4d6.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7168/6723333203_9b6dd668d7.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7165/6723332151_b3e01b44e8.jpg)

These are more possible 'short snorter' notes.  All are Chinese and date from 1936-1944.  The top 5 are valued from 1 to 50 yuan and the last one is a 50 cent note from 1940.  Some Chinese banks used the yuan and some used cents and dollars.  This 50-cent note is from a Japanese puppet bank; one set up by the occupying Japanese authorities.  It may be in cents and dollars to distinguish it from the national currency units or because the Japanese authorities wanted to develop 'faith' in the money they were issuing and used the older dollar unit (which dated from the 19th century.)


Title: More China WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 31 January 2012, 01:26:18
I've recently found a lot more Chinese banknotes from wartimes so here are some more:

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7152/6723334635_f586e4a3b6.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7007/6723334393_c07e9d9710.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7020/6723334183_08aa982178.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7149/6723336109_5b6e0d56a3.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7162/6723333637_96ea9b226d.jpg)

These are 5- 10- and 20 yuan notes from 1936, 1940 & 1941.  They are similar in design with Sun Yat Sen on the left although they come from 2 banks: The Bank of China and The Central Bank of China.


Title: More China WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 31 January 2012, 01:34:05
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7001/6723335863_75a666c1bc.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7017/6723335979_7fd72e6946.jpg)
This Bank of Communication 5 yuan note is dated 1914 and would have been used during WWI. I think the design is quite beautiful so have shown both the front and back of the note. 17 other cities besides Shanghai may be stamped on the back.  My 10 yuan note of the same design is shown quite a bit up-thread.
The American Banknote Company designed this note (among some others in this thread.)  They did US money in the 19th century as well as US stamps which today are considered 'classic' designs.  The ABC did many other nation's paper money and/or stamp design and printing.


Title: More China WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 1 February 2012, 04:26:10
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7174/6723333419_5e8dc5a38b.jpg)
A 1942 issue 20 yuan note from the Central Bank of China.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7166/6723332959_e2d28abc4b.jpg)
A 1935 50 yuan note issued by the Farmer's Bank of China.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7149/6723332867_29d9e57289.jpg)
Here's the back side of the same bank's 10 yuan note.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7141/6723332521_62377bd22a.jpg)
The Farmer's Bank of China issued this 50 yuan note in 1942.  1942 was the last year this bank was allowed to issue its own banknotes.


Title: More China WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 2 February 2012, 02:00:57
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7152/6723332347_fa947c356a.jpg)
1940 50 cent banknote issued by The Central Reserve Bank of China which was a Japanese occupation forces puppet bank.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7146/6723331993_ec304845be.jpg)
1940 5 yuan note from the Central Reserve Bank of China.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7005/6723331865_2a13433118.jpg)
Here's the back side of the Central Reserve Bank of China's 1940 10 yuan note (the front looks pretty much like the 5 yuan note pictured above.)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7152/6723331525_eb06102259.jpg)
Here's the banks 1943 10 yuan note; I think the quality in design and printing has started to decline as the war progresses.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7027/6723331303_ba3435f083.jpg)
The 1,000 yuan denominations shows inflation kicking in on this 1944 Central Reserve Bank of China banknote.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7010/6723331165_d7659fb498.jpg)
By 1944, the CRBoC was issuing 10,000 yuan notes; here's the back of one I own again showing the poor paper quality, design work and printing.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7152/6723330753_96ef318b9d.jpg)
this is the front of the 1945 5,000 yuan note from the same bank.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7001/6723330543_f1dce05732.jpg)
This 1945 10 yuan note was intended to be used by Japanese military forces within China.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Koen on 2 February 2012, 18:39:38
how do you store your collection Alan?


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 3 February 2012, 02:34:35
My collection is stored in special sleeves made for currency. It keeps the notes safe from further damage or soiling (even oil from fingers) and then alphabetized by country in special boxes (acid-free paper) to further reduce deterioration.  I keep a list on index cards and a spreadsheet to know exactly what I have, what I paid, in which box it's stored, etc. I use Pick/Krause catalog numbers (fairly standard #s in numismatics) to order the currency within a country.   

Everything is also scanned and loaded to Photobucket or Flickr; here's a link to the collection of China banknotes on Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623789163297/ (http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623789163297/)   Once you see my account name there, you can navigate through the various 'sets' to see other country's money.

the same basic method is used for postcards, too.  there is no catalog for postcards, though, so I just use my own ideas for varous topics and file the cards in that way.


Title: More Croatia WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 4 February 2012, 00:03:53
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7015/6723325065_3365328d34.jpg)
The 100 Kuna banknote issued by Croatia in May of 1941.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7153/6723324817_3a5faf0aee.jpg)
The 1,000 kuna note from 1943.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7010/6723324565_70b170b74e.jpg)
and here's the 5,000 kuna note from the same series.


Title: More France WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 4 February 2012, 00:09:19
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7019/6723442031_b67f19f825.jpg)
This 500 franc note was issued by the newly-liberated French government in 1944. 


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Koen on 4 February 2012, 18:30:24
My collection is stored in special sleeves made for currency. It keeps the notes safe from further damage or soiling (even oil from fingers) and then alphabetized by country in special boxes (acid-free paper) to further reduce deterioration.  I keep a list on index cards and a spreadsheet to know exactly what I have, what I paid, in which box it's stored, etc. I use Pick/Krause catalog numbers (fairly standard #s in numismatics) to order the currency within a country.   

Everything is also scanned and loaded to Photobucket or Flickr; here's a link to the collection of China banknotes on Flickr:
[url]http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623789163297/[/url] ([url]http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623789163297/[/url])   Once you see my account name there, you can navigate through the various 'sets' to see other country's money.

the same basic method is used for postcards, too.  there is no catalog for postcards, though, so I just use my own ideas for varous topics and file the cards in that way.


what do you have of Belgian currency?


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 5 February 2012, 01:36:32
There are just 21 different banknotes from Belgium. Here's a link to my Flickr set of them:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623771409074/ (http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623771409074/)

(http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4078/4802047911_ff5191392e.jpg)
this one's my favorite; nice art nouveau design.  100 francs, 1938 (the date is at top center)


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Koen on 5 February 2012, 09:52:40
There are just 21 different banknotes from Belgium. Here's a link to my Flickr set of them:
[url]http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623771409074/[/url] ([url]http://www.flickr.com/photos/38860277@N06/sets/72157623771409074/[/url])

([url]http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4078/4802047911_ff5191392e.jpg[/url])
this one's my favorite; nice art nouveau design.  100 francs, 1938 (the date is at top center)

there are some I still remember from my younger days, nice to see them again. Do you only collect banknotes or also coins?


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 5 February 2012, 18:08:32
well, I do collect coins, in general, and 'the coins of war' [coins issued during war-time] but I haven't organized them like my paper money collection.  The thing about coins is that there are often several mints in a country, more denominations in general, and new coins are issued every year.  A complete banknote collection is usually much smaller than a complete coin collection.  Plus, paper is cheaper than silver or gold; it's just easier in many ways to collection banknotes.
Belgium and Russia are two countries -- besides the US -- that I collect all coins and stamps (not just war-time issues).  I've lived in both countries and really appreciate their history, culture and people.

When I'm done listing all of my paper money, I'll scan some coins to share here, too!


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Koen on 5 February 2012, 18:19:39
well, I do collect coins, in general, and 'the coins of war' [coins issued during war-time] but I haven't organized them like my paper money collection.  The thing about coins is that there are often several mints in a country, more denominations in general, and new coins are issued every year.  A complete banknote collection is usually much smaller than a complete coin collection.  Plus, paper is cheaper than silver or gold; it's just easier in many ways to collection banknotes.
Belgium and Russia are two countries -- besides the US -- that I collect all coins and stamps (not just war-time issues).  I've lived in both countries and really appreciate their history, culture and people.

When I'm done listing all of my paper money, I'll scan some coins to share here, too!

the reason I ask is because I have a little 'jar' with coins and I'll gladly send you some... for free ofcourse  hihi


Title: French Guyana WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 9 February 2012, 02:26:00
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7153/6723441859_d7c480f1c2.jpg)

Et, voila:  the 1942 French Guyana 5 franc banknote.  


Title: French West Africa WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 9 February 2012, 02:30:12
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7153/6723441635_e6c15af0e9.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7144/6723441745_19da509f3d.jpg)


Here's the French West Africa 25 franc note dated 1942; I like it so much, I'm showing both the front and back.  The French government issued stamps and money for regions of many of their colonies, not each individual colony.  Thus you see French West Africa, French Equitorial Africa, French Indo-China, etc.


Title: More German WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 9 February 2012, 02:34:16
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7164/6723451525_b8b04c040c.jpg)

this 20 mark Allied Occupation of Germany money differs from one I posted above by a small but significant (to collectors) detail:  it has a 9-digit serial number as opposed to an 8-digit number followed by a dash (-)  It makes the value 2 and a half times more!


Title: More Greece WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 11 February 2012, 02:00:19
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7030/6723457233_9a808e29ee.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7150/6723456995_e30b086334.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7035/6723456739_689a0386fe.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7145/6723456507_a62c8ae9c2.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7002/6723456265_b9ebcdf4bd.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7033/6723456069_96187234e8.jpg)

Various Greek banknotes from 1942-1944.  The values start out in 1942 as 1,000 or 2,000 drachmas; by 1944, the values are 10 billion drachmas; the 2nd from the bottom isn't 2,000 drachmas, it's 2,000 million drachmas and the '10' is 10 billion, too!


Title: More Hungary WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 11 February 2012, 23:15:52
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7002/6723470553_c8c57937f7.jpg)
This is the Hungarian 1,000 Pengo banknote issued in May of 1945.  The note was issued with and without the stamp affixed to the front.  I think it had to do with authenticating the money but I'm not sure; counterfeiters could just as easily make a fake stamp to put on their fake paper bills. . .

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7171/6723470235_3c03a169f7.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7003/6723470107_5abda35f90.jpg)
Not surprisingly, Hungary suffered severe hyper-inflation under Soviet occupation immediately following the end of WWII.  This is the 1 million pengo note issued November of 1945.  Note that this is a mere 6 months after the 1,000 pengo note.  I chose to show both sides because even though this is a hyper-inflation note (and probably obsolete in months) the design is beautiful.  The German hyper-inflation period of 1923-24 had notes coming out so fast that they only had designs on one side and they were basic, simple designs at that.  This Hungarian note is a real work of art.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7169/6723469995_5408bf7daa.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7014/6723469877_873361425a.jpg)
Did I mention hyper-inflation?  Here's the 1 billion pengo note which came out in June of 1946.  The design is still nice but the printing process has been simplified and the over-all eye-appeal is not as great as the 1 million pengo note.  It's much smaller, too.



Title: More India WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 11 February 2012, 23:21:48
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7010/6723478045_80a55b4534.jpg)
Here is the 1943 issue 2 ruppee banknote from India.  Good ol' King George VI is on this one.  A red serial number instead of the black one we see would quadruple the value of this note!


Title: Iraq WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 12 February 2012, 17:43:31
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7160/6723477863_8732e9bf36.jpg)

1942 1/4 (one fourth) Dinar banknote issued for Iraq.


Title: More Italy WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 12 February 2012, 17:47:18
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7158/6723477509_b988e43c2f.jpg)

Another denomination of the Allied Occupation of Italy paper money series, this is the 100 lire note from 1943.


Title: Re: More Italy WWII Money
Post by: MontyB on 13 February 2012, 04:55:36
([url]http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7158/6723477509_b988e43c2f.jpg[/url])

Another denomination of the Allied Occupation of Italy paper money series, this is the 100 lire note from 1943.



Now that stuff I have by the truck load as most of the family served with 2nd NZEF in Italy.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 13 February 2012, 05:01:38
Monty, the 500 and 1,000 lire notes from both the '1943' and '1943 A' series are valuable; anywhere from $10 to $500 depending on condition. the 50 lire notes are worth close to $50 if they're uncirculated (perfect condition)
I just picked up my first 1943-A 1,000 lire note at a coin show today and still don't have a 500 lire one.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: MontyB on 13 February 2012, 07:00:46
Monty, the 500 and 1,000 lire notes from both the '1943' and '1943 A' series are valuable; anywhere from $10 to $500 depending on condition. the 50 lire notes are worth close to $50 if they're uncirculated (perfect condition)
I just picked up my first 1943-A 1,000 lire note at a coin show today and still don't have a 500 lire one.


Well at my mothers house there is a huge family bible (ironic given most of us are atheists) that houses all of the money that came back from Italy with my father and uncles (the father came back in late 1946 as he was part of J-Force after the war) when I am up there in a couple of weeks I will take a look and if there is more than one (highly likely as there is about 75-100 different bank notes from the Italian campaign) I will send you a freebie.

:)
 


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 13 February 2012, 16:29:52
thanks for the offer!  :D


Title: More Luxembourg WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 14 February 2012, 06:49:13
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7158/6723490867_a0006db552.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7020/6723490727_3a305f9dae.jpg)
Here is the 1943 20 franc banknote from Luxembourg.  I'm showing the back of this one as well because I think it's interesting that they chose to have this scene of peaceful farming in the midst of the World War.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7008/6723490599_cc6a530021.jpg)
This 1944 10 franc note is similar in design to a 5-franc note I posted up-thread except for the color and denomination.


Title: More Mexico Revolutionary Era Money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 February 2012, 04:24:49
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7162/6723490409_707f329a4c.jpg)
Oaxaca State issued this 1 peso note in 1915.  the paper quality is quite poor but the colors and design are interesting.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7154/6723490221_7676cfd516.jpg)
Guaymas Sonora issued this 1 peso note the year before, in March of 1914.


Title: More Morocco WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 15 February 2012, 04:33:05
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7149/6723489641_abe25549a7.jpg)
This 50 franc banknote was issued in 1944 by Morocco.

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5029/5674817470_66b968c4be.jpg)
This 5 franc note issued in 1943 has seen better days.  It's one of the North African notes that is a very small piece of cardboard like one or two of the other Moroccan notes I've posted before.


Title: More New Caledonia WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 18 February 2012, 03:53:57
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7143/6723500201_bc8d643c61.jpg)

Up-thread I've shared other denominations of New Caledonia's banknote issued from WWII.  Here is the 5 franc note from the 1943 series.


Title: More Philippines WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 18 February 2012, 03:58:40
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7142/6723508471_af76966412.jpg)
the front of this 1941 Philippines 1 peso note has an orange seal (different from others I've posted above, with blue seals) because of different series/dates of issue.  Otherwise a lot of Philippines' notes have a very similar design.

US Navy aviators were issued 'emergency' funds in their survival kits should they bail/crash.  These notes with serial numbers E6 324 001E to E6 524 000E were the notes supplied in these emergency packets and were actually released in c1944.
Perhaps Jack Dierks was one such aviator?


Title: Re: More Luxembourg WWII Money
Post by: Koen on 19 February 2012, 19:08:11
([url]http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7158/6723490867_a0006db552.jpg[/url])
([url]http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7020/6723490727_3a305f9dae.jpg[/url])
Here is the 1943 20 franc banknote from Luxembourg.  I'm showing the back of this one as well because I think it's interesting that they chose to have this scene of peaceful farming in the midst of the World War.

([url]http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7008/6723490599_cc6a530021.jpg[/url])
This 1944 10 franc note is similar in design to a 5-franc note I posted up-thread except for the color and denomination.


Luxembourg language is a mixture of French and German, as a result you see writings that are very different! their language is very nice and funny to hear  ;)


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 19 February 2012, 19:11:18
Yes, I called the currency "francs" but it's quite obviously spelled "frang" on a bill; I can imagine how it sounds.


Title: More Philippines WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 23 February 2012, 21:21:25
Here are several more 'emergency' issue notes and money issued by geurilla "government" issued money. Many have names of regions or Philippine states in which there were issued or used.
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7031/6723508075_d45ea3a2d5.jpg)
I found these two recently; note the consecutive serial numbers.  They were issued in 1942.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7154/6723507841_452a964e6c.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7152/6723507747_00cc20f4d0.jpg)
this one has a faded stamp 'Commonwealth of the Philippines'; the date of issue is unknown.  I like the back image so much I thought I'd show it as well.  These notes show the generally poor printing tecniques and paper used.


Title: More Philippines WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 24 February 2012, 18:30:10
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7032/6723507655_e911547563.jpg)
Here is another Philippines emergency banknote from December, 1941.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7152/6723507525_57b604fb05.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7163/6723507339_3cf924f38c.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7013/6723506587_20ecdbf37c.jpg)
10- and 20-peso notes issued in 1942.  Drawings of Quezon and Roosevelt are fairly crude but the overall design isn't so bad.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7031/6723506963_eafe1b549b.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7151/6723506751_d2dfd42ce2.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7023/6723506655_3436044844.jpg)
By 1943, when this banknote was issued, the design and paper quality had deteriorated.  Too much text, too!

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7017/6723507173_a9953474d1.jpg)
This 1944 issue shows General Douglas MacArthur and is similar to the 1942 designs shown above.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7019/6723506415_fb59640da1.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7027/6723506341_561e4a47b7.jpg)
This 1945 1 peso note shows the poorest design, paper and printing quality of all.  The war would soon be over, though.


Title: More Russia WWI Money
Post by: Alan65 on 27 February 2012, 02:02:20
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7007/6723518289_a8d06c2a9f.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7171/6723518425_13f9f8616e.jpg)
This 5 ruble note is the one in use at the start of WWI.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7144/6723517887_0f09cbf6bf.jpg)
The 500 ruble banknote used in WWI.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7003/6723516809_bd265d5b24.jpg)
Again, inflation took over the Russian economy; we see 5 ruble notes in 1914 and 1,000 ruble notes like this issued by the Czar in 1917.


Title: More Russian Civil War Money
Post by: Alan65 on 27 February 2012, 02:07:23
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7145/6723517613_891fa4207b.jpg)
This 5 ruble note looks identical to the WWI issue I posted above.  The serial number prefix tells us this is a Soviet-era issued note late WWI or the Russian Civil War.
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7017/6723517295_50a7a984ac.jpg)
Here is the 500 ruble note from 1919.  The Russian Civil War and the war with Poland were going on when this money was used.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 27 February 2012, 16:07:29
Re post No. 218: I have a much better example of the 'Peter the Great' 500 rouble note (which is a very common issue) - I'll try and get a decent scan to you.  Not, necessarily, quickly; the only scanner I have is roughly coeval with the Ark.  I may have to be a bit of digging to get it to work with OSs newer than W3.11...


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 27 February 2012, 17:14:58
I look forward to seeing it!

Haven't mentioned it but this particular piece of money is rather large, 275 x 127 mm, so it gets damaged. 

There are 2 signature varieties, too:  Konshin (1909-1912) and Shipov (1912-1917).  The Konshin signature is more rare.  I'll attach images of the signatures when I get a chance.


Title: South Korea Money from Korean War
Post by: Alan65 on 29 February 2012, 01:43:42
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7023/6723527945_a3301251d7.jpg)
South Korea's 1951 1,000 won banknote.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7025/6723527645_0138203fff.jpg)
Here is the 1952 1,000 won note from South Korea.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7153/6723526941_32d7701c29.jpg)
The 1953 10 Hwan note of South Korea.  It looks vaguely (to me as far as color and paper quality) like the Allied occupation notes from Germany, France and Italy near the end of WWII.  It turns out, this series was printed in the US.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7165/6723526629_f5d97ed154.jpg)
The South Korean 10 Hwan note also issued in 1953 and printed in South Korea.
The hwan was introduced in 1953 at the rate of 1 hwan = 100 won (inflation had caused the won to go from 15=$1 in 1945 to 6,000=$1 in early 1953.)


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 29 February 2012, 23:40:12
I have the following war or conflict related notes.  I will only put them up as .jpg's (and thereby waste your bandwidth) if you consider them of relevance and interest.  All are crisp and, although having been folded, will scan well, unless otherwise noted.

I mostly have notes that were given to me, I had in change, or I bought because they looked pretty.  Very few are of any value.  I'm not a notaphilist, but if someone gives me a pretty banknote, I'm not going to throw it away.

In no particular order:

100 Old Shekels, Israel, Six Day War vintage.  I can't read Hebrew so I don't know the exact date.
1 Lebanese Pound, about the same.  This one is quite pretty.
50 Groschen, Alliied Military Government of Austria, undated, un-numbered.
20 Rials, Iran, issued very shortly before the Shah fell. 
1 Peso, Cuba, 1969, uncirculated.  Not one of the ones signed Che, these are quite valuable now.
20 Piastres, Ottoman Empire, AH 1332 which I think is 1913.  Quite worn. One sided.  Nice watermark though.  Al of the Ottoman notes are printed on newspaper-quality paper, at best
5 Piastes, ditto.
Another, but AH 1331 and a different backgound colour.
20 Piastres, AH 1331, better condition than the rest
1/4 Turkish Pound, AH 1331
A much better printed but very small note, AH 1331, 1 of something.  Double sided. The Arabic is very calligraphic and difficult to read. 
1000 Francs, 30 May 1940, Banque de France.  Huge and very pretty.
The 500 rouble note we have discussed before.  There are a few tiny stains where this note has been paper-clipped and the paper-clip has rusted; huge and very pretty.  There is a 1000 pencil mark on it - 1000 lire, which is what I bought it for.  About €0.60 on modern money.  About what it's worth now.
Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe, $2.  1983, pre-hyper-inflation. Uncirculated.

I've found the scanner now.  It works.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: MontyB on 1 March 2012, 01:50:36
Cool, look forward to seeing them.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 1 March 2012, 12:38:33
Sure, but which?  Some are only slightly war/conflict related, and I don't want to take up the forum owner's bandwidth with stuff that isn't relevant.  It might be better if I scan them at hi-res and send them to the forum owner, who can then choose the best compromise between resolution and blowing his monthly bandwidth quota.

[Modified to say] I have a lightbox, so rather than scanning them I will photograph them lit from underneath.  This shows up the watermark.

And also - the signatures on the 500 roubles are very fancy, and I can't read them.  If they are of interest, I will scan them at hi-res and perhaps someone can tell me who the signatory was.  Both the Upravlyayoshchii and Kassir begin with what looks like an M, but a Cyrillic handwriting T looks a lot like an M.

Finally: I mentioned that collecting banknotes isn't really my hobby; but languages are.  If you have banknotes, coins, or other militaria which have markings in languages you don't know, I can probably translete them for you.  I am familiar with all the commonly-used scripts, such as Roman, Cyrillic, Greek, Chinese, Devanagiri, Arabic, Farsi/Urdu etc. Just scan 'em and post 'em, and I'll do my best to translate 'em.  Many banknotes feature very fancy calligraphy, and especially if it is Arabic, can be difficult to decipher.  I'll do my best!

Donadagohvi,   <--- that's 'au revoir' in Cherokee  :-)

Richard


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 1 March 2012, 17:12:46
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7044/6944011439_e6df338575.jpg)

Here are the Konshin (blurry on the left) vs. Shipov (on the right) signatures.  The letter you're probably seeing at the beginning of the name is the Cyrillic "Sh" in Shipov.  you can see it in mine lower center-right.

I, for one, would be interested in seeing the Ottoman notes as I don't have any.  I put my scans on Photobucket (free) or Flickr (also free) [well, free within limits of number of images/total size of files for both of these sites!] and then insert the links to a post so WaT isn't really 'hosting' the files.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: MontyB on 2 March 2012, 00:06:19
Sure, but which?  Some are only slightly war/conflict related, and I don't want to take up the forum owner's bandwidth with stuff that isn't relevant.  It might be better if I scan them at hi-res and send them to the forum owner, who can then choose the best compromise between resolution and blowing his monthly bandwidth quota.


Well I would probably start a new thread and put the pictures in that as it is Alans thread that is about the money of war the forum itself just lists money (which I take as meaning all types).

Later...  <---- thats Donadagohvi in Kiwi.

:)


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 2 March 2012, 00:22:16
My concept of this thread is to show money that was issued during wartime.  Now, of course, there's always a fighting going on some place.  WWII was big enough that I've listed every country's paper money I have--nowhere was immune to the effects of war then and what they showed on their money, the printing or quality of paper all comes through in varying degrees to give a 'feel' for what it was like.  I don't think I'd show Chinese money from 1861-65, however, as China wasn't particularly affected by the US Civil War.

I certainly see Turkish money from 1913 as being related to WWI (it's not like they suddenly withdrew all currency and printed new stuff on day 1 of the war so these notes were still in circulation.)  Israeli money from '67 would certainly fit into the general rubric as well.

Personally, I think it'd be handy to have all the images in one thread. 


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: MontyB on 2 March 2012, 04:37:21
Well there ya go, problem solved.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 2 March 2012, 16:30:24
Merhba!  <---- Welcome! in Maltese

What is the third emoticon from the left meant to represent?  'I have fleas'?

Alan, you have my e-mail address, because you sent me a welcome message when I joined this forum.  I've lost it.  Send me a one-liner and I will photograph all the notes at hi-res, e-mail them to you, and you can choose which ones you'd like to put up, where, and at what resolution.

My 500 rouble note is the Shipov one.  I'm sure if it had been rare, it wouldn't have been 1000 lire. Still, it's pretty.

Are you interested in war/conflict related coins?  I have the famous 1943 zinc-coated steel cent, and various other WWII coins from Nazi-occupied Europe.  Few, alas, are in particularly good condition, as they are made of zinc, lead, and other metals not normally used for currency because of their propensity for corrosion. 

I can read Russian as easily as I can French or English, but Russian handwriting is usually beyond me.  For that matter, supposedly-Roman signatures often look like a picture of a demented spider regurgitating a furball, rather than anything resembling the signor's name.

My info has a little Union Flag and no location stated: actually I'm Irish (I only live in England), and from 26 March I will be more or less permanently in Sooke, BC.  Pick up a stone in Seattle, throw it hard enough in a North-westerly direction, and it'll probably end up in my girlfriend's garden.  Our house is very nearly the southermost point of BC.

Hello, neighbour!


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 2 March 2012, 22:33:32
Belated self-introduction to the forum:

I have never served any nation militarily.  I can't even remember how I stumbled across this place, but I follow it avidly because of the pix of banknotes.

I have dual nationality, Irish and British, and I am a signatory of both nations' Official Secrets Acts. This is well known to both governments, and actually has come in useful as a 'legal fiction'; As a UK citizen I've been vetted as UK eyes only A and NATO eyes only A; Ireland is neutral and not a member of Nato.  So, my Irish left hand doesn't know what my British right hand is doing. 

I have two military anecdotes that may amuse you.  I have spent almost all of my life in non-English speaking countries: I therefore speak a very slow, precise and clear English, because that's the only way to be understood.  Think Alec Guinness, John Gielgud, Peter O'Toole (none of whom are actually English).

On a flight from Onehorseville, Nebraska, to Hicksville Tennessee, a Blue Suit pinned me down with an eagle eye and said "Son, how did you serve your country today?"

"Which one?" (Just get that really posh accent right)

But best is when I arrived at a USAF base very close to Seattle WA accompanied by a girl carrying a heavy kitbag, whose South American ancestry is written on her face.  There is no way you would mistake her for anything other than a South American Indian.

"Shears?" I was greeted.  I nodded.  Firm handshake.  Then I said:

"Please meet my wife, Squadron Leader Shears"

The Royal Canadian Air Force is an equal opportunity employer.  She flew interdict over Libya.





Title: More South Vietnam Money Vietnam War Era
Post by: Alan65 on 3 March 2012, 02:48:32
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7172/6723526151_618e0d7793.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7168/6723526079_a0bcdd1488.jpg)
South Vietnam 1 dong note, front and back, issued 1964.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7032/6723525981_4b64cb1bc1.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7015/6723525797_269133da84.jpg)
Nguyen-Hue (a Vietnamese warrior figure) is on the front of this 1966 200 dong banknote.  An unknown leader on horseback leading pikemen(?) is on the back. Quite a bit different from the peaceful farmer on his tractor just 2 years before.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7147/6723525711_434f182e3e.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7164/6723525579_ec683bca9f.jpg)
Front and back of the 500 dong note issued by South Vietnam in 1972, the year the US military left.


Title: More Suriname WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 3 March 2012, 02:51:22
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7150/6723525489_79377a503c.jpg)
Suriname's 1 gulden note from 1940.  I imagine a stamp was used for the date (30 October 1940) and both signatures at the bottom.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Militarbehoerde on 3 March 2012, 06:47:35
That is actually a Silver Certificate.  Freely translated: Surinam Silver certificate.  Valid for one guilder. Can be redeemed on request at the Surinam-ish Bank in all branches in the country. Exchangeable in silver, Aankondiging literally means announcement, in this context it probably means "by order" or "as decreed".

The South Vietnamese notes say, again loosely translated, Owned-by-the-People Sovereign Viet Nam.  The denomination is pretty obvious.  The small print is too small to be legible, and is probably the usual 'Counterfeiters will be strung up by their balls' rubric.

If you want translations of any other notes posted here, shout, and I'll do my best.  I can't do Chinese or Japanese, sorry.  On many Arabic notes the calligraphy is so fancy that even people who read and write the language every day have a problem, and I'm completely out of my depth.  But bring on your Amharic, your Korean, your Devanagiri, and I'll do my best.  

Before Ireland joined the Euro, the banknotes were signed in Gaelic by the Secretary of the Treasury.  Or, if you prefer a literal translation from the Gaelic, the writer of runes in the section of silver.

Irish has words for things like spambot and social networking, but also can take you back to the iron age, as in the example above (e.g, the Irish name Elvis, Elbhlís.  It means Switzerland).  I don't know if there have ever been any Basque coins or notes, but that language takes you even further back:  the word for iron means "black stone" and for copper "red stone". The language goes back to the Neolithic.


Title: Re: The Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 7 March 2012, 15:43:45
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7047/6786562572_5d25d9e2b4.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7063/6786562376_0ede5b1993.jpg)

Front and back of the Farmer's Bank of China 1 yuan note issued in 1941.
There are several other Farmer's Bank notes in earlier posts; they are some of the nicer looking (printing quality, design, paper, etc.) pieces of money from China in that era.


Title: More US Civil War Money
Post by: Alan65 on 9 March 2012, 17:29:04
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7069/6932741283_88f5f8a66c.jpg)
Obviously, this 1862 1 dollar bill from Virginia has seen better days.  Each State in the Confederacy issued it's own paper money during the US Civil War.
Most notes were uniface (printed on one side only; ie. the back is blank.)


Title: More Hungary WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 11 March 2012, 23:47:20
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7209/6932709807_ef9ae68e89.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7059/6932709535_7edbc903e0.jpg)
here is the front and back of the 15 January 1941 issue of the 20 pengo note of Hungary.  Another beautiful design.


Title: More Italy WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 11 March 2012, 23:51:54
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7056/6786602900_6070578a9f.jpg)
1942 50 lira note from Italy.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7040/6932718519_fd67b46e38.jpg)
The 1,000 lira note issued by Allied Occupation forces (basically, the US government) in 1943.  Same design as the other denomination for Italy and very similar to those issued for use in France and Germany.


Title: More United States Military Payment Certificates
Post by: Alan65 on 13 March 2012, 01:01:47
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7196/6786643314_32495fa4b6.jpg)
This series 461 [the first series; I don't know why they started with #461!] 50-cent note was introduced into the ETO on 16 Sepember '46 and the PTO on 30 September '46.  It was withdrawn on 10 March 1947.  This is a short time of use.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7179/6786643080_35d57e8b64.jpg)
The next series was #471 and it was in use 10 March 1947 to 22 March 1948.  This 50-cent note is close in design to the first series.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7183/6932759149_087e0020c0.jpg)
This 1 dollar note is from the next series, #472.  It would have been in circulation from 22 March 1948 to 20 June 1951.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7197/6786642590_7014de51a6.jpg)
This series 521 25-cent note was used between 25 May 1954 and 27 May 1958.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7196/6786642376_2d64a7f470.jpg)
This 10-cent note from the 591 series was issued for use beginning 26 May, 1961.  It was withdrawn in the Pacific (Japan, Korea and the Philippines) on 6 January 1964 and from Cyprus and Iceland the next week.  It wasn't used in any other areas.


Title: More Bohemia & Moravia WWII money
Post by: Alan65 on 5 July 2012, 18:41:05
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7087/7359391158_d42becf85b.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7214/7174162625_3cf4b161c1.jpg)

This 50 kronen note is dated 12 September 1940 and was issued by the Bohmen & Mahren Protectorate government.  I find the design very similar to the 10- and 20-kronen notes I listed above dating from 1942 and 1944.


Title: Bosnia War (1992-1995) Money
Post by: Alan65 on 5 July 2012, 18:46:57
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8021/7359391336_87dbec2913.jpg)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8026/7174162823_510bdcf07d.jpg)

The 1990's Bosnia conflict caused massive disruption to the lives of those involved.  Inflation plagued the economy and this note shows what can happen even in the modern days.  This 10 dinara note from July 1992 was over-printed to become a 100,000 dinara note in November 1993.


Title: More Cambodia Vietnam War era Money
Post by: Alan65 on 5 July 2012, 18:58:02
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8009/7359396324_fa13a87e0c.jpg)
This Cambodia 500 riels note is identical to one I shared above except for the signatures; these signatures date this note to 1972 (as opposed to 1968 for the one above.)  This design was actually used from 1958-1972.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7232/7359396112_189be689bc.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7230/7359396010_8980a802aa.jpg)
Two years later, in 1974, the 500 riels note looked like this and the country had become the Khmer Republic.  The only vestige of French colonial times in the design is the 'Banque Nationale du Cambodge' French language on the back.


Title: More China WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 5 July 2012, 19:11:19
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7075/7174171863_bb4b8f8443.jpg)
Yet another Federal Reserve Bank of China (a Japanese puppet bank) banknote, this 50 yuan note was issued in 1945.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7234/7359399864_7ddd3bd119.jpg)
This Imperial Japanese government note is a Japanese military issue for use in China issued in 1940.  It differs slightly from another I've listed previously because of the title across the top.


Title: More Croatia WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 9 July 2012, 01:28:48
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8006/7359404940_d45401923c.jpg)

This is the 10 kuna banknote issued by Croatia and dated 30 August 1941.  German and Italian forces had invaded Yugoslavia in April and by the end of May, a fascist puppet state was issuing money like this.  My note has a double-letter prefix to the serial number but there is a slightly more rare single-letter prefix issue as well.
I think this is a pretty note although the colors are drab, to say the least.


Title: Cuba Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 12 July 2012, 16:55:38
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8150/7174176665_a3acc2063d.jpg)
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7079/7359404670_db3f2e652f.jpg)
The 1961 issue of the National Bank of Cuba's 5 peso note is nothing too special for this category of 'The Money of War'.  The back side of the note, however, depicts a scene from Castro's 'invasion' of the island.  The title at the top left says 'September-October 1958 Invasion'.  This date would place the 'invasion' scene after the Battle of Las Mercedes at a time when Castro felt he could come out of the mountains and face the Cuban Army for control of Cuba's cities.


Title: More Japan Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 6 August 2012, 21:14:58
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8148/7504195878_a2b7630ca0.jpg)

This occupation of Japan 1 yen note has a serial number prefix and suffix of "D" which is the last issue of this series which came out in 1957.


Title: More Mexico WWII Money
Post by: Alan65 on 8 August 2012, 21:27:21
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8150/7359428658_19efa153d4.jpg)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8007/7359428554_2316315f64.jpg)

This Mexican 1 peso note was issued in 1943.  Published by the American Banknote Company, this money is quite beautiful and well-designed.


Title: More Mexican Revolution Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 8 August 2012, 21:32:26
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8008/7504201114_beac1e4f5d.jpg)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8155/7504201238_01de26a8d5.jpg)

This 50-centavos banknote was issued by the Mexican state of Chihuahua and is dated September 18,1915.  Like much of the paper money of this time and place, the paper is low-quality and the design is more simple than much Mexican paper money from other times.


Title: More Peru Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 11 August 2012, 00:08:03
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7235/7174207747_9e949ee2ea.jpg)

This is the Peru 1,000 intis banknote of 1988.  Pictured at right is Andrés Avelino Cáceres, a Peruvian President and national hero for his role as general.

Between the 1850's and 1880's he fought against Ecuadorian, Spanish and Chilean forces in various wars and served as President of Peru three times in the 1880's and 1890's. 


Title: More US Military Payment Certificates Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 13 August 2012, 21:39:37
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7273/7504219252_aa356c54ce.jpg)

If you were a US soldier in the Korean War, this series 481 50-cent note might have been in your pocket. 


Title: More Australia WWII Banknotes
Post by: Alan65 on 1 December 2012, 19:09:42
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8206/8235696950_fe7f200084.jpg)
Pictured above is a recent acquisition, an Australian 1942 1 pound note.  George VI is pictured at right while a watermark of Captain Cook is (invisible in this scan) in the blank oval at left.  The Armitage/McFarlane signatures date this to 1942. The design was used from 1938-1952.
Unfortunately, a small piece is missing on the bottom edge, center and the upper left corner.  Oh, well, a note like this is rare and I take what I find!


Title: Money of the French Revolution
Post by: Alan65 on 3 December 2012, 20:08:33
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8477/8234655801_22a67d51e4.jpg)

Pictured above is a 5 livre ("pounds") assignat note from 1793.  The top and the bottom border contains the following 'Created the 10th of Brumaire, Year 2 of the French Republic'  The French Revolution brought us use of the metric system but also a new calendar.  I think Brumaire is around October/November and has something to do with 'fog' ('the foggy month' so to speak) and the 10th equates to 31 October; the second year of the First Republic (are we on the Fifth now?) equates to 1793.
The note is uniface (blank on the back) and contains a blind stamp in the white space to the left of the signature, Gilles Somebody.  The notes were cut out of sheets by hand and you can see the uneven border on this one.


Title: More USA Military Payment Certificates Money of War
Post by: Alan65 on 4 December 2012, 23:46:09
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8485/8235726656_d919d6f2c5.jpg)

This 25-cent MPC, series 692, was issued for use in Vietnam on June 1, 1971 and withdrawn on March 15, 1973. It was the last series ever used.
Unfortunately, this note is missing corners.