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Author Topic: The Money of War  (Read 175442 times)
Militarbehoerde
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« Reply #220 on: 27 February 2012, 17:07:29 »
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Re post No. 218: I have a much better example of the 'Peter the Great' 500 rouble note (which is a very common issue) - I'll try and get a decent scan to you.  Not, necessarily, quickly; the only scanner I have is roughly coeval with the Ark.  I may have to be a bit of digging to get it to work with OSs newer than W3.11...
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Alan65
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« Reply #221 on: 27 February 2012, 18:14:58 »
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I look forward to seeing it!

Haven't mentioned it but this particular piece of money is rather large, 275 x 127 mm, so it gets damaged. 

There are 2 signature varieties, too:  Konshin (1909-1912) and Shipov (1912-1917).  The Konshin signature is more rare.  I'll attach images of the signatures when I get a chance.
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Alan65
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« Reply #222 on: 29 February 2012, 02:43:42 »
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South Korea's 1951 1,000 won banknote.


Here is the 1952 1,000 won note from South Korea.


The 1953 10 Hwan note of South Korea.  It looks vaguely (to me as far as color and paper quality) like the Allied occupation notes from Germany, France and Italy near the end of WWII.  It turns out, this series was printed in the US.


The South Korean 10 Hwan note also issued in 1953 and printed in South Korea.
The hwan was introduced in 1953 at the rate of 1 hwan = 100 won (inflation had caused the won to go from 15=$1 in 1945 to 6,000=$1 in early 1953.)
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Militarbehoerde
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« Reply #223 on: 1 March 2012, 00:40:12 »
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I have the following war or conflict related notes.  I will only put them up as .jpg's (and thereby waste your bandwidth) if you consider them of relevance and interest.  All are crisp and, although having been folded, will scan well, unless otherwise noted.

I mostly have notes that were given to me, I had in change, or I bought because they looked pretty.  Very few are of any value.  I'm not a notaphilist, but if someone gives me a pretty banknote, I'm not going to throw it away.

In no particular order:

100 Old Shekels, Israel, Six Day War vintage.  I can't read Hebrew so I don't know the exact date.
1 Lebanese Pound, about the same.  This one is quite pretty.
50 Groschen, Alliied Military Government of Austria, undated, un-numbered.
20 Rials, Iran, issued very shortly before the Shah fell. 
1 Peso, Cuba, 1969, uncirculated.  Not one of the ones signed Che, these are quite valuable now.
20 Piastres, Ottoman Empire, AH 1332 which I think is 1913.  Quite worn. One sided.  Nice watermark though.  Al of the Ottoman notes are printed on newspaper-quality paper, at best
5 Piastes, ditto.
Another, but AH 1331 and a different backgound colour.
20 Piastres, AH 1331, better condition than the rest
1/4 Turkish Pound, AH 1331
A much better printed but very small note, AH 1331, 1 of something.  Double sided. The Arabic is very calligraphic and difficult to read. 
1000 Francs, 30 May 1940, Banque de France.  Huge and very pretty.
The 500 rouble note we have discussed before.  There are a few tiny stains where this note has been paper-clipped and the paper-clip has rusted; huge and very pretty.  There is a 1000 pencil mark on it - 1000 lire, which is what I bought it for.  About €0.60 on modern money.  About what it's worth now.
Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe, $2.  1983, pre-hyper-inflation. Uncirculated.

I've found the scanner now.  It works.
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MontyB
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« Reply #224 on: 1 March 2012, 02:50:36 »
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Cool, look forward to seeing them.
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We are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. ~Francois De La Rochefoucauld
Militarbehoerde
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« Reply #225 on: 1 March 2012, 13:38:33 »
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Sure, but which?  Some are only slightly war/conflict related, and I don't want to take up the forum owner's bandwidth with stuff that isn't relevant.  It might be better if I scan them at hi-res and send them to the forum owner, who can then choose the best compromise between resolution and blowing his monthly bandwidth quota.

[Modified to say] I have a lightbox, so rather than scanning them I will photograph them lit from underneath.  This shows up the watermark.

And also - the signatures on the 500 roubles are very fancy, and I can't read them.  If they are of interest, I will scan them at hi-res and perhaps someone can tell me who the signatory was.  Both the Upravlyayoshchii and Kassir begin with what looks like an M, but a Cyrillic handwriting T looks a lot like an M.

Finally: I mentioned that collecting banknotes isn't really my hobby; but languages are.  If you have banknotes, coins, or other militaria which have markings in languages you don't know, I can probably translete them for you.  I am familiar with all the commonly-used scripts, such as Roman, Cyrillic, Greek, Chinese, Devanagiri, Arabic, Farsi/Urdu etc. Just scan 'em and post 'em, and I'll do my best to translate 'em.  Many banknotes feature very fancy calligraphy, and especially if it is Arabic, can be difficult to decipher.  I'll do my best!

Donadagohvi,   <--- that's 'au revoir' in Cherokee  :-)

Richard
« Last Edit: 1 March 2012, 14:10:11 by Militarbehoerde » Logged
Alan65
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« Reply #226 on: 1 March 2012, 18:12:46 »
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Here are the Konshin (blurry on the left) vs. Shipov (on the right) signatures.  The letter you're probably seeing at the beginning of the name is the Cyrillic "Sh" in Shipov.  you can see it in mine lower center-right.

I, for one, would be interested in seeing the Ottoman notes as I don't have any.  I put my scans on Photobucket (free) or Flickr (also free) [well, free within limits of number of images/total size of files for both of these sites!] and then insert the links to a post so WaT isn't really 'hosting' the files.
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MontyB
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« Reply #227 on: 2 March 2012, 01:06:19 »
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Sure, but which?  Some are only slightly war/conflict related, and I don't want to take up the forum owner's bandwidth with stuff that isn't relevant.  It might be better if I scan them at hi-res and send them to the forum owner, who can then choose the best compromise between resolution and blowing his monthly bandwidth quota.


Well I would probably start a new thread and put the pictures in that as it is Alans thread that is about the money of war the forum itself just lists money (which I take as meaning all types).

Later...  <---- thats Donadagohvi in Kiwi.

Smiley
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We are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. ~Francois De La Rochefoucauld
Alan65
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« Reply #228 on: 2 March 2012, 01:22:16 »
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My concept of this thread is to show money that was issued during wartime.  Now, of course, there's always a fighting going on some place.  WWII was big enough that I've listed every country's paper money I have--nowhere was immune to the effects of war then and what they showed on their money, the printing or quality of paper all comes through in varying degrees to give a 'feel' for what it was like.  I don't think I'd show Chinese money from 1861-65, however, as China wasn't particularly affected by the US Civil War.

I certainly see Turkish money from 1913 as being related to WWI (it's not like they suddenly withdrew all currency and printed new stuff on day 1 of the war so these notes were still in circulation.)  Israeli money from '67 would certainly fit into the general rubric as well.

Personally, I think it'd be handy to have all the images in one thread. 
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MontyB
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« Reply #229 on: 2 March 2012, 05:37:21 »
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Well there ya go, problem solved.
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We are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. ~Francois De La Rochefoucauld
Militarbehoerde
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« Reply #230 on: 2 March 2012, 17:30:24 »
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Merhba!  <---- Welcome! in Maltese

What is the third emoticon from the left meant to represent?  'I have fleas'?

Alan, you have my e-mail address, because you sent me a welcome message when I joined this forum.  I've lost it.  Send me a one-liner and I will photograph all the notes at hi-res, e-mail them to you, and you can choose which ones you'd like to put up, where, and at what resolution.

My 500 rouble note is the Shipov one.  I'm sure if it had been rare, it wouldn't have been 1000 lire. Still, it's pretty.

Are you interested in war/conflict related coins?  I have the famous 1943 zinc-coated steel cent, and various other WWII coins from Nazi-occupied Europe.  Few, alas, are in particularly good condition, as they are made of zinc, lead, and other metals not normally used for currency because of their propensity for corrosion. 

I can read Russian as easily as I can French or English, but Russian handwriting is usually beyond me.  For that matter, supposedly-Roman signatures often look like a picture of a demented spider regurgitating a furball, rather than anything resembling the signor's name.

My info has a little Union Flag and no location stated: actually I'm Irish (I only live in England), and from 26 March I will be more or less permanently in Sooke, BC.  Pick up a stone in Seattle, throw it hard enough in a North-westerly direction, and it'll probably end up in my girlfriend's garden.  Our house is very nearly the southermost point of BC.

Hello, neighbour!
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Militarbehoerde
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« Reply #231 on: 2 March 2012, 23:33:32 »
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Belated self-introduction to the forum:

I have never served any nation militarily.  I can't even remember how I stumbled across this place, but I follow it avidly because of the pix of banknotes.

I have dual nationality, Irish and British, and I am a signatory of both nations' Official Secrets Acts. This is well known to both governments, and actually has come in useful as a 'legal fiction'; As a UK citizen I've been vetted as UK eyes only A and NATO eyes only A; Ireland is neutral and not a member of Nato.  So, my Irish left hand doesn't know what my British right hand is doing. 

I have two military anecdotes that may amuse you.  I have spent almost all of my life in non-English speaking countries: I therefore speak a very slow, precise and clear English, because that's the only way to be understood.  Think Alec Guinness, John Gielgud, Peter O'Toole (none of whom are actually English).

On a flight from Onehorseville, Nebraska, to Hicksville Tennessee, a Blue Suit pinned me down with an eagle eye and said "Son, how did you serve your country today?"

"Which one?" (Just get that really posh accent right)

But best is when I arrived at a USAF base very close to Seattle WA accompanied by a girl carrying a heavy kitbag, whose South American ancestry is written on her face.  There is no way you would mistake her for anything other than a South American Indian.

"Shears?" I was greeted.  I nodded.  Firm handshake.  Then I said:

"Please meet my wife, Squadron Leader Shears"

The Royal Canadian Air Force is an equal opportunity employer.  She flew interdict over Libya.



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Alan65
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« Reply #232 on: 3 March 2012, 03:48:32 »
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South Vietnam 1 dong note, front and back, issued 1964.



Nguyen-Hue (a Vietnamese warrior figure) is on the front of this 1966 200 dong banknote.  An unknown leader on horseback leading pikemen(?) is on the back. Quite a bit different from the peaceful farmer on his tractor just 2 years before.



Front and back of the 500 dong note issued by South Vietnam in 1972, the year the US military left.
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« Reply #233 on: 3 March 2012, 03:51:22 »
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Suriname's 1 gulden note from 1940.  I imagine a stamp was used for the date (30 October 1940) and both signatures at the bottom.
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Militarbehoerde
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« Reply #234 on: 3 March 2012, 07:47:35 »
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That is actually a Silver Certificate.  Freely translated: Surinam Silver certificate.  Valid for one guilder. Can be redeemed on request at the Surinam-ish Bank in all branches in the country. Exchangeable in silver, Aankondiging literally means announcement, in this context it probably means "by order" or "as decreed".

The South Vietnamese notes say, again loosely translated, Owned-by-the-People Sovereign Viet Nam.  The denomination is pretty obvious.  The small print is too small to be legible, and is probably the usual 'Counterfeiters will be strung up by their balls' rubric.

If you want translations of any other notes posted here, shout, and I'll do my best.  I can't do Chinese or Japanese, sorry.  On many Arabic notes the calligraphy is so fancy that even people who read and write the language every day have a problem, and I'm completely out of my depth.  But bring on your Amharic, your Korean, your Devanagiri, and I'll do my best.  

Before Ireland joined the Euro, the banknotes were signed in Gaelic by the Secretary of the Treasury.  Or, if you prefer a literal translation from the Gaelic, the writer of runes in the section of silver.

Irish has words for things like spambot and social networking, but also can take you back to the iron age, as in the example above (e.g, the Irish name Elvis, Elbhlís.  It means Switzerland).  I don't know if there have ever been any Basque coins or notes, but that language takes you even further back:  the word for iron means "black stone" and for copper "red stone". The language goes back to the Neolithic.
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Alan65
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« Reply #235 on: 7 March 2012, 16:43:45 »
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Front and back of the Farmer's Bank of China 1 yuan note issued in 1941.
There are several other Farmer's Bank notes in earlier posts; they are some of the nicer looking (printing quality, design, paper, etc.) pieces of money from China in that era.
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« Reply #236 on: 9 March 2012, 18:29:04 »
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Obviously, this 1862 1 dollar bill from Virginia has seen better days.  Each State in the Confederacy issued it's own paper money during the US Civil War.
Most notes were uniface (printed on one side only; ie. the back is blank.)
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« Reply #237 on: 12 March 2012, 00:47:20 »
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here is the front and back of the 15 January 1941 issue of the 20 pengo note of Hungary.  Another beautiful design.
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Alan65
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« Reply #238 on: 12 March 2012, 00:51:54 »
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1942 50 lira note from Italy.


The 1,000 lira note issued by Allied Occupation forces (basically, the US government) in 1943.  Same design as the other denomination for Italy and very similar to those issued for use in France and Germany.
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« Reply #239 on: 13 March 2012, 02:01:47 »
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This series 461 [the first series; I don't know why they started with #461!] 50-cent note was introduced into the ETO on 16 Sepember '46 and the PTO on 30 September '46.  It was withdrawn on 10 March 1947.  This is a short time of use.


The next series was #471 and it was in use 10 March 1947 to 22 March 1948.  This 50-cent note is close in design to the first series.


This 1 dollar note is from the next series, #472.  It would have been in circulation from 22 March 1948 to 20 June 1951.


This series 521 25-cent note was used between 25 May 1954 and 27 May 1958.


This 10-cent note from the 591 series was issued for use beginning 26 May, 1961.  It was withdrawn in the Pacific (Japan, Korea and the Philippines) on 6 January 1964 and from Cyprus and Iceland the next week.  It wasn't used in any other areas.
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