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Author Topic: The Money of War  (Read 181010 times)
Alan65
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« Reply #200 on: 11 February 2012, 03:00:19 »
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Various Greek banknotes from 1942-1944.  The values start out in 1942 as 1,000 or 2,000 drachmas; by 1944, the values are 10 billion drachmas; the 2nd from the bottom isn't 2,000 drachmas, it's 2,000 million drachmas and the '10' is 10 billion, too!
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Alan65
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« Reply #201 on: 12 February 2012, 00:15:52 »
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This is the Hungarian 1,000 Pengo banknote issued in May of 1945.  The note was issued with and without the stamp affixed to the front.  I think it had to do with authenticating the money but I'm not sure; counterfeiters could just as easily make a fake stamp to put on their fake paper bills. . .



Not surprisingly, Hungary suffered severe hyper-inflation under Soviet occupation immediately following the end of WWII.  This is the 1 million pengo note issued November of 1945.  Note that this is a mere 6 months after the 1,000 pengo note.  I chose to show both sides because even though this is a hyper-inflation note (and probably obsolete in months) the design is beautiful.  The German hyper-inflation period of 1923-24 had notes coming out so fast that they only had designs on one side and they were basic, simple designs at that.  This Hungarian note is a real work of art.



Did I mention hyper-inflation?  Here's the 1 billion pengo note which came out in June of 1946.  The design is still nice but the printing process has been simplified and the over-all eye-appeal is not as great as the 1 million pengo note.  It's much smaller, too.

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Alan65
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« Reply #202 on: 12 February 2012, 00:21:48 »
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Here is the 1943 issue 2 ruppee banknote from India.  Good ol' King George VI is on this one.  A red serial number instead of the black one we see would quadruple the value of this note!
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Alan65
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« Reply #203 on: 12 February 2012, 18:43:31 »
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1942 1/4 (one fourth) Dinar banknote issued for Iraq.
« Last Edit: 12 February 2012, 18:51:05 by Alan65 » Logged
Alan65
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« Reply #204 on: 12 February 2012, 18:47:18 »
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Another denomination of the Allied Occupation of Italy paper money series, this is the 100 lire note from 1943.
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MontyB
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« Reply #205 on: 13 February 2012, 05:55:36 »
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<Quoted Image Removed>

Another denomination of the Allied Occupation of Italy paper money series, this is the 100 lire note from 1943.



Now that stuff I have by the truck load as most of the family served with 2nd NZEF in Italy.
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We are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. ~Francois De La Rochefoucauld
Alan65
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« Reply #206 on: 13 February 2012, 06:01:38 »
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Monty, the 500 and 1,000 lire notes from both the '1943' and '1943 A' series are valuable; anywhere from $10 to $500 depending on condition. the 50 lire notes are worth close to $50 if they're uncirculated (perfect condition)
I just picked up my first 1943-A 1,000 lire note at a coin show today and still don't have a 500 lire one.
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« Reply #207 on: 13 February 2012, 08:00:46 »
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Monty, the 500 and 1,000 lire notes from both the '1943' and '1943 A' series are valuable; anywhere from $10 to $500 depending on condition. the 50 lire notes are worth close to $50 if they're uncirculated (perfect condition)
I just picked up my first 1943-A 1,000 lire note at a coin show today and still don't have a 500 lire one.


Well at my mothers house there is a huge family bible (ironic given most of us are atheists) that houses all of the money that came back from Italy with my father and uncles (the father came back in late 1946 as he was part of J-Force after the war) when I am up there in a couple of weeks I will take a look and if there is more than one (highly likely as there is about 75-100 different bank notes from the Italian campaign) I will send you a freebie.

Smiley
 
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« Reply #208 on: 13 February 2012, 17:29:52 »
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thanks for the offer!  Brede lach
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Alan65
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« Reply #209 on: 14 February 2012, 07:49:13 »
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Here is the 1943 20 franc banknote from Luxembourg.  I'm showing the back of this one as well because I think it's interesting that they chose to have this scene of peaceful farming in the midst of the World War.


This 1944 10 franc note is similar in design to a 5-franc note I posted up-thread except for the color and denomination.
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« Reply #210 on: 15 February 2012, 05:24:49 »
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Oaxaca State issued this 1 peso note in 1915.  the paper quality is quite poor but the colors and design are interesting.


Guaymas Sonora issued this 1 peso note the year before, in March of 1914.
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« Reply #211 on: 15 February 2012, 05:33:05 »
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This 50 franc banknote was issued in 1944 by Morocco.


This 5 franc note issued in 1943 has seen better days.  It's one of the North African notes that is a very small piece of cardboard like one or two of the other Moroccan notes I've posted before.
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« Reply #212 on: 18 February 2012, 04:53:57 »
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Up-thread I've shared other denominations of New Caledonia's banknote issued from WWII.  Here is the 5 franc note from the 1943 series.
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« Reply #213 on: 18 February 2012, 04:58:40 »
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the front of this 1941 Philippines 1 peso note has an orange seal (different from others I've posted above, with blue seals) because of different series/dates of issue.  Otherwise a lot of Philippines' notes have a very similar design.

US Navy aviators were issued 'emergency' funds in their survival kits should they bail/crash.  These notes with serial numbers E6 324 001E to E6 524 000E were the notes supplied in these emergency packets and were actually released in c1944.
Perhaps Jack Dierks was one such aviator?
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« Reply #214 on: 19 February 2012, 20:08:11 »
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<Quoted Image Removed>
<Quoted Image Removed>
Here is the 1943 20 franc banknote from Luxembourg.  I'm showing the back of this one as well because I think it's interesting that they chose to have this scene of peaceful farming in the midst of the World War.

<Quoted Image Removed>
This 1944 10 franc note is similar in design to a 5-franc note I posted up-thread except for the color and denomination.


Luxembourg language is a mixture of French and German, as a result you see writings that are very different! their language is very nice and funny to hear  Knipoog
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Alan65
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« Reply #215 on: 19 February 2012, 20:11:18 »
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Yes, I called the currency "francs" but it's quite obviously spelled "frang" on a bill; I can imagine how it sounds.
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« Reply #216 on: 23 February 2012, 22:21:25 »
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Here are several more 'emergency' issue notes and money issued by geurilla "government" issued money. Many have names of regions or Philippine states in which there were issued or used.

I found these two recently; note the consecutive serial numbers.  They were issued in 1942.



this one has a faded stamp 'Commonwealth of the Philippines'; the date of issue is unknown.  I like the back image so much I thought I'd show it as well.  These notes show the generally poor printing tecniques and paper used.
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« Reply #217 on: 24 February 2012, 19:30:10 »
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Here is another Philippines emergency banknote from December, 1941.




10- and 20-peso notes issued in 1942.  Drawings of Quezon and Roosevelt are fairly crude but the overall design isn't so bad.




By 1943, when this banknote was issued, the design and paper quality had deteriorated.  Too much text, too!


This 1944 issue shows General Douglas MacArthur and is similar to the 1942 designs shown above.



This 1945 1 peso note shows the poorest design, paper and printing quality of all.  The war would soon be over, though.
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Alan65
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« Reply #218 on: 27 February 2012, 03:02:20 »
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This 5 ruble note is the one in use at the start of WWI.


The 500 ruble banknote used in WWI.


Again, inflation took over the Russian economy; we see 5 ruble notes in 1914 and 1,000 ruble notes like this issued by the Czar in 1917.
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Alan65
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« Reply #219 on: 27 February 2012, 03:07:23 »
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This 5 ruble note looks identical to the WWI issue I posted above.  The serial number prefix tells us this is a Soviet-era issued note late WWI or the Russian Civil War.

Here is the 500 ruble note from 1919.  The Russian Civil War and the war with Poland were going on when this money was used.
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