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Author Topic: The Money of War  (Read 174199 times)
MontyB
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« Reply #120 on: 17 June 2010, 02:19:23 »
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Pictured above are more Allied Occupation currency from my collection.  The notes with a 'A' behind the serial number in the center were 1946 while the ones with a 'B' were issued for use in 1945 (yes, the 'B' appears to have come first.)  The 'A' is much more rare; for the 10 sen notes, it's a differnce of a few dollars but for the 100 yen note the price difference for a collector is in the $100s.


Wow that is odd as I have about 30 of those A notes buried somewhere in my collection, my father was part of J-Force after the war and returned with a sizable collection of them.
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Alan65
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« Reply #121 on: 18 June 2010, 00:33:36 »
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Pictured above are the 5-, 10- and 100-yen notes issued by the Bank of Japan in 1945-46.  It's unclear to me whether or not the 10-yen note which was issued in 1945 was issued during or after the war.  The Bank of Japan history doesn't mention what was going on in August/September of '45 in this matter.  The money didn't change appearance too much during and after the war.
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Alan65
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« Reply #122 on: 18 June 2010, 00:38:08 »
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My lone Korean banknote of 1944 is rather worn to be sure.  Its value is 10 yen and was issued by the Japanese Empire of which Korea was a 'government general' (like Poland was of Germany during the war.)
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Alan65
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« Reply #123 on: 19 June 2010, 06:45:05 »
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the Japanese occupation banknotes issued for Malaya in 1942 ($5) and 1944 ($100) with very similar designs to almost all of the other Japanese WWII occupation notes pictured in this thread.



Although the date printed on these notes says 1941, they were all issued in 1945 after the war.  This series of banknotes had a huge range of denominations from 1-cent to 10,000 dollars ($10k being a reported but not confirmed value according to my catalog.)
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Alan65
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« Reply #124 on: 19 June 2010, 18:29:57 »
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The Mexican Revolution produced many different banknotes from many different states of Mexico.  The four pictured above were issued by the state of Chihuahua in 1914 and '15.


These 2 beautiful banknotes were issued by the Provisional Government of Mexico at Veracruz  in February of 1915.  Besides the 1 and 2 peso bills, there were 10, 20, 50 and 100 peso denominations.

This note is uncatalogued; it may come from a local organization which issued scrip although with the serial number and fairly nice paper quality and design it may be somewhat widely used/issued by an official organization.  Tlalpujahua Michoacan did issued some 'official' money but not this one.
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Alan65
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« Reply #125 on: 21 June 2010, 19:36:29 »
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This design for the 5 franc note was first issued in 1922; this copy is dated November 1941, during the Vichy government of France's North African colonies.
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Alan65
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« Reply #126 on: 21 June 2010, 19:42:20 »
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Here are more denominations for the Japanese Occupation currency issued for use in the Dutch East Indies/Netherland Indies (the future Indonesia).
The 10-cent and half-gulden notes were issued in 1942; inflation once again raised its ugly head when the Japanese issued paper money without regard for finding a way to back it and the 100 gulden note of 1944 was the result.
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Alan65
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« Reply #127 on: 21 June 2010, 19:45:10 »
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Norway's 1 krone banknote was issued in 1917.  This was actually not replaced by a new design until 1940.
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Alan65
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« Reply #128 on: 21 June 2010, 19:47:28 »
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Here is the 1940 [well, this one's dated 1944] Norway 1 krone banknote issued during WWII which replaced the above 1917 1 krone bill.  They look fairly similar to me and are the same size.
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Alan65
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« Reply #129 on: 23 June 2010, 19:49:39 »
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After the war left the Philippines, this note was issued by the Central Bank of the Philippines (c.1949); the back has the "Victory" overprint like one I posted earlier but also has the bank name added in red.  this one also came in denominations up to 500 pesos.



During the war, numerous provinces and 'currency committees' issued money for use in guerrilla-held areas.  Pictured above are two examples.  There are hundreds of issues and desgins.
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« Reply #130 on: 23 June 2010, 19:55:01 »
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The 5 centavo note from Portugal issued in April of 1918.
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Alan65
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« Reply #131 on: 23 June 2010, 20:05:49 »
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Russian paper money is some of the most beautiful, in my opinion.  Pictured above is the 1899 issue of the 50-ruble note.  The signature tell us this was issued between 1912-17 and in use during WWI until the Revolution.


These 3- and 10-ruble notes are from the 1902-12 issue; again, the Shipov signature (the one on the left on the 3-ruble note/the one that starts in the '0' of the '10' lower center of the 10-ruble note) tells us these are from 1912-17.

Yes, this bill clearly has '1898' printed on it at center bottom; it is however from a 1915-1917 issue of the 1-ruble note.  The serial number prefix probably indicates that this copy was actually issued by the Provisional Government (the one between the Tsar and a full Communist take-over which briefly ruled in 1918.)  I'm not 100% sure on this one!
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« Reply #132 on: 29 June 2010, 02:51:53 »
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The 3 notes above are from the 1915 'Small Change' series.  There were 2-, 3-, 10-, 15- and 20-kopeck notes, too.

This banknote is from the Russian Government Credit Note Series of 1917 and is good for 250 rubles.  The serial number actually tells us this was issued by the Soviet government, but the Tsar's notes looked identical (except for the different serial numbers.)


The 20- and 40-ruble notes from 1917 issued by the Kerensky government (the main one in between the Tsar and Lenin), these were based on consular stamp designs and are rather small--c.6.2 x 5.5 cm including the borders.
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« Reply #133 on: 29 June 2010, 18:12:18 »
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100 ruble 1918 'Government Credit Note', issued after fall of Tsar but before Communists took over.

500-ruble State Treasury Note from 1918. 

I consider this and the next ones more from the Russian Civil War than WWI but since they over-lapped, I'll post them here.  This one is from Odessa, where a Ukrainian government issued 'Exchange Notes of Odessa Area'.

South Russia 100-ruble banknote issued in 1919.  It's really a work of art!

Transcaucasian Commissariat 100-ruble banknote, issued 1918.

The Azerbaijan Socialist Soviet Republic's 5 million ruble note of 1923.  Shown here to prove the inflation of the time and show the various Soviet Republics of the USSR had issued their own money in the early years.
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Alan65
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« Reply #134 on: 30 June 2010, 20:28:43 »
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The above are the 1918 5- and 10-rubles banknotes issued by the Siberian Provisional Administration (1st issue).  There was also a 1-ruble note.

The 3-ruble denomination of the 2nd issue for the same Administration.

Siberian Administration's 5% Debenture notes (kind of like bonds, I think); the above is the 25-ruble note from May 1919.


The 50- and 1,000-ruble notes from June 1919.
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« Reply #135 on: 1 July 2010, 21:15:13 »
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the above banknote is from the Siberian Krasnoyarsk Territory and was issued in 1919.  This one is 25-rubles but also came in 1, 3, 5 and 10 rubles.

This 1920 100-ruble note comes from Chita in Eastern Siberia.

50-kopeks denomination from Priamur region of Eastern Siberia also from 1920.


The above scans show both sides of a curious note I found in a local coin shop.  I believe it's from the US occupation of Vladivostok c1919-20 and represents a coupon/'money' usable in the "American Grill" (a local restaurant?).  I found two and sold one to a collector in Vladivostok who is attempting to find out more but so far has come up empty.  This is a 1-ruble note and a 3-ruble note has sold on a large currency auction several years ago as well.  The bottom line in English and Russian don't quite match--the Russian says, roughly, 'redeemable for 1 ruble'/'you will be re-imbursed 1 ruble'.  Very curious!


2 more unknown/uncatalogued notes representing WWI/Russian Civil War 'coupons' good for money + interest at some future date.
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« Reply #136 on: 2 July 2010, 20:52:09 »
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This 100 dinara Serbia banknote from German occupation issued in May 1941.  It is the 1929 Yugoslavia issue over-printed with "Serbia" [looks like CPnCKNX with new signatures.] It was issued by the Serbian National Bank.
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« Reply #137 on: 2 July 2010, 20:54:45 »
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This 1946 Sweden banknote is the same--except for the date at left--as that from 1918 to 1952.  This 5 kronor note would have been seen at the end of WWI and throughout WWII.
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« Reply #138 on: 2 July 2010, 21:00:46 »
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When the Russian Empire collapsed, Eastern Ukraine declared its independence in January, 1918; Western Ukraine followed in November 1918.  The paper currency pictured above is from the 1918 State Credit Note issue.  Ukraine was soon absorbed into the USSR, Romania, Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hungary.  The Germans briefly revived hopes of an independent Ukraine in 1941-4 but Ukrainians had to wait until 1991 for their own country.
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« Reply #139 on: 2 July 2010, 21:07:30 »
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I've described Military Payment Certificates in an early post.  This 5-cent note is from the first series, #461.  It was issued in Europe for occupying US troops on 16 September, 1946, and two weeks later in Japan and Korea for the Pacific Theatre.  It was withdrawn 10 March, 1947.  (A very short period of use!)

Series 471 replaced the above 461 on 10 March, 1947, and withdrawn on 22 March, 1948.
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