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Author Topic: Appomattox Battle and Surrender  (Read 10180 times)
Alan65
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« on: 17 November 2008, 01:51:17 »
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This is the famous Thomas Nast painting of Robert E. Lee surrending to Ullyses S. Grant in the Appomattox courthouse.


A less-famous image of the two generals from a Rexall Drug store postcard folder from the 1920s or '30s.
 

A prison at Appomattox.


this is the house Fitzhugh Lee [Confederate Cavalry officer] and his staff used in Appomattox (still standing in the 20's/30's when the postcard folder was published.)


this was Colonel Poe's office near Appomattox.

The Battle of Appomattox Courthouse (in Virginia) is seen as the battle which ended the US Civil War.  RE Lee's Army of Northern Virginia was defeated by the Union Army of the Potomac and the Army of the James on 9 April, 1865.
Wikipedia says there were still 175,000 Confederate troops in the field around the Confederacy, but once Lee surrendered, the rest of the Confederate troops quickly followed.

I am by no means an expert on the ACW; someone else can fill in a lot more detail I'm sure.  (the wikipedia article seems very good.)
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MontyB
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« Reply #1 on: 24 August 2011, 08:58:50 »
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Yeah ok its a bit late I know but what the hell...



Quote
Lee's Surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia


On April 9, 1865, Generals Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee met in the parlor of a house in Appomattox Court House, VA, to discuss this surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, which would end the Civil War. According to the terms, the men of Lee's army could return home in safety if they pledged to end the fighting and deliver their arms to the Union Army.

The surrender formalities to end the Civil War lasted 4 days. On April 9, 1865, Generals Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee met in the parlor of a house in Appomattox Court House, VA, to discuss the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. The terms were generous: The men of Lee's army could return home in safety if they pledged to end the fighting and deliver their arms to the Union Army.

On April 12, 1865, in a quiet but emotional ceremony, the infantry of Lee's army surrendered their arms, folded their battle flags, and received their parole papers, which guaranteed them safe passage home.



Library of Congress - Newspaper Article - Extra. Surrender of Lee and 30,000 men. Peace in 6 days. [Philadelphia, April 9th, 1865].
Transcript of Articles of Agreement Relating to the Surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia (1865)

Appomattox Court House Virginia

April 10, 1865

Agreement entered into this day in regard to the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia to the United States Authorities.
1st The troops shall march by Brigades and Detachments to a designated point, stock their Arms, deposit their flags, Sabres, Pistols, etc. and from thence march to their homes under charge of their Officers, superintended by their respective Division and Corps Commanders, Officers, retaining their side Arms, and the authorized number of private horses.

2. All public horses and public property of all kinds to be turned over to Staff Officers designated by the United States Authorities.

3. Such transportation as may be agreed upon as necessary for the transportation of the Private baggage of Officers will be allowed to accompany the Officers, to be turned over at the end of the trip to the nearest U.S. Quarter Masters, receipts being taken for the same.

4. Couriers and Wounded men of the artillery and Cavalry whose horses are their own private property will be allowed to retain them.

5. The surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia shall be construed to include all the forces operating with that Army on the 8th inst., the date of commencement of negociation for surrender, except such bodies of Cavalry as actually made their escape previous to the surrender, and except also such forces of Artillery as were more than Twenty (20) miles from Appomattox Court House at the time of Surrender on the 9th inst.



Source: NARA
Citation: Articles of Agreement in Regard to the Surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia under Gen. Robert E. Lee, April 10, 1865; War Department, Record and Pension Office, 1892-1904; Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1780's-1917; Record Group 94; National Archives.
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We are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. ~Francois De La Rochefoucauld
Alan65
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« Reply #2 on: 9 September 2011, 19:46:52 »
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Never too late, Monty!

we were 'celebrating' the 150th anniversary of the attack on Fort Sumter and the 1st Battle of Bull Run earlier this year.  2 nice commemorative stamps were issued this year.
http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/2011/01/fort-sumter-and-bull-run-stamps-will-lead-civil-war-150th-anniversary-commemorative-series7415
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MontyB
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« Reply #3 on: 10 September 2011, 02:36:42 »
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Never too late, Monty!

we were 'celebrating' the 150th anniversary of the attack on Fort Sumter and the 1st Battle of Bull Run earlier this year.  2 nice commemorative stamps were issued this year.
http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/2011/01/fort-sumter-and-bull-run-stamps-will-lead-civil-war-150th-anniversary-commemorative-series7415



Hehe it is rather odd, in a country that studies the Napoleonic wars I find the American Civil war more interesting and think it would make an interesting addition to the website.
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We are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. ~Francois De La Rochefoucauld
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